Trova il tuo prossimo podcast preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
175: 14 Ways to Eat Like the French — Savor Good Food, Don't Fear It: ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #175 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio  "How you eat, when you eat, for how long you eat, and with whom you eat might be more important...

175: 14 Ways to Eat Like the French — Savor Good Food, Don't Fear It: ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #175 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio "How you eat, when you eat, for how long you eat, and with whom you eat might be more important...

A partire dalThe Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style


175: 14 Ways to Eat Like the French — Savor Good Food, Don't Fear It: ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #175 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio "How you eat, when you eat, for how long you eat, and with whom you eat might be more important...

A partire dalThe Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

valutazioni:
Lunghezza:
34 minuti
Pubblicato:
Sep 18, 2017
Formato:
Episodio podcast

Descrizione

~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #175 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio "How you eat, when you eat, for how long you eat, and with whom you eat might be more important than what you eat. Eating and enjoying real food is what matters, not tracking calories." —Johnny Adamic As reported by Time magazine last year, while the United States unfortunately has been found to describe  34% of its population as obese, France is ten percentage points fewer. The British Journal of Nutrition observed that a significant type of diet that was contributing to the obesity epidemic in the U.S. was what they coined as the "sweet and processed" diet, in other words foods such as "skim milk, fruit juice, breakfast cereal, chocolates . . ." Much of how we approach food is based on the culture in which we were raised and most directly, the household habits in which we live as a child. However, the food producers and advertisers, especially in America (as you will see below) chose to exploit the health of their consumer in order to gain profits, and thus our parents or grandparents may have fell prey to welcoming into our childhood unhealthy food tastes. As shared in The Guardian, "All the foods that you regularly eat are ones you learned to eat" and the good news is since your choices were learned, you can learn new choices and unlearn the habits that do not suit a healthy body, mind and lifestyle. I was recently speaking to a family who had just returned from a month long visit in Italy. Sitting down to listen to them share their experiences with regards to dining and the appreciation for food and the portions served reminded me of why I appreciate the French, and as evident in their anecdote, the Italian culture as well. Food is to be appreciated, embraced and seen as a component in how to live well. While food may not be the absolute centerpiece of our lives, it is indeed a crucial component and to ignore such an everyday avenue to experience pleasure in the short-term and a healthy long life throughout the duration of our long lives is to be ignorant of the gift food can bring. Today I'd like to share with you 14 ways the French approach eating and welcoming food into their lives as a way to enrich each of our appreciation and experience with the daily detail we all balance, experience and need. 1. Step away from sugar at breakfast As a child I can remember having boxes of cereal in one of our kitchen shelves; however, my mom was careful to limit us to Cheerios and Shredded Wheat. I quickly became aware of the more sugar laden options when staying at friends homes for sleep-overs and so when my mom would on special occasions let us purchase a sugary option, it was always Frosted Flakes. But I do applaud my mom for being cognizant of the sugar content in our morning routine. Since then, I eat the same breakfast nearly each morning as I shared in this post and the only sweet component is the local honey which is why I found it eye-opening that as shared in Michael Moss's book Salt, Sugar, Fat  "the sweet breakfast was an invention of the cereal manufacturers in the middle of the last century". With each year I teach rhetoric to my high school juniors, the more and more parallels I see to not only determining the intention of writers, speakers, and advertisers, but in companies as well. In the case mentioned above, why are those breakfast cereal ads propositioning kids rather than parents? Perhaps because a savvy parent realizes what a child should be eating. My larger point is, rather than make choices of what advertisers would like to sell you or what is the trend in the food world, come to understand what your body needs. Healthy can absolutely make you happy, not artificially so as a sugary cereal will for a short moment and then leave you high and dry before the day has hardly begun. 2. Mind your portions Recently I reviewed the newly established French Market here in Bend, and one of the reasons I enjoyed
Pubblicato:
Sep 18, 2017
Formato:
Episodio podcast