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Section © Teachers Cueva Insite Section Opener AN OVERVIEW OF AFRICA a) Introduction In this section students learn about the history and diversity of Africa. In a Writing for Understanding activity, students view and identify the loc of transparency images that show some of the diverse peoples and environments of Africa. They use this information to write an acrostic poem about Africa's diversity. Then, they learn how indigenous, Islamic, and western heritages have influenced aspects of an East African’s life. Next, in a Social Studies Skill Builder activity, students match descriptions of eight key historical periods with corresponding maps and dates to construct a timeline of Aftican history. Objectives Students will be able to + write an acrostic poem about Africa’s diversity; + describe eight key periods in African history, Materials In addition to the transparencies, student handouts (which you will copy for the students), and transparency masters (which you will copy onto transparencies) provided in this section, you will need an overhead projector, a CD player, colored pens, scissors, and tape. ‘Medem Aico 1 | Activity Discovering Africa’s Diversity Writing for Understanding Overview ‘This Writing for Understanding activity introduces students to Africa’s diversity, Students view 12 transparencies, each of which portrays a feature of contemporary Africa, such as a street scene in Ghana, a Kenyan disco, and a rainforest village in Zaire. Working in pairs, students identify the location of each image on a map. Then, they identify and describe on their handout details they see in each of eight categories—such as economic, religious, and architectural. Finally, pairs write an acrostic poem summarizing what they have discovered about Aftica’s diversity, Afierward, students read how indigenous, Islamic, and western heritages influenced aspects of one East African’s life, Procedures at a Glance Before class, divide your students into mixed-ability pairs. Tell them they will learn about Aftica’s diversity, Pass out Student Handout 1.1A to each student, Project Transparency 1.1A, and have students identify the location of the image on their map. Allow students approximately 30 seconds to examine the transparency and (o identify and describe on their handout details they see in each of eight categories. Then, use the Teacher’s Guide to ‘Transparencies to give them information about what is depicted in the image. Continue this process for each of the remaining transparencies. After students have viewed all the transparencies, project Transparency Master 1.1B and have pairs write an acrostic poem summarizing what they have discovered about Africa’s diversity. Finally, have students read Bakari Bakari’s oral history, in which he describes how indigenous, Islamic, and western heritages have influenced aspects of his life. 2 Modem Aficn (© Teachers Coca nstiane 1 Procedures in Detail 1. This activity is designed to introduce students to Africa’s diversity by briefly acquainting them with some of the peoples and environments of Africa, The images were selected based on their diverse representation of urban and rural life, social class, gender, religion, clothing, architecture, physiography, industry, and ethnicity. 2. Before class, divide your students into mixed-ability pairs, Prepare an overhead transparency that shows students who their partners are and how to arrange their desks. Project the transparency, and ask students to move into their correct places. 3. Tell students this activity is designed to introduce them to diversity in Africa, Pass out Student Handout 1.1A: Responding to Images of Africa to each student, Tell students they will see 12 transparencies, each of which portrays a feature of contemporary Africa, Explain that for each transparency they will identify and describe on their handout details they see in eight categories—economy, architecture, social class, environment (physiography and surroundings), clothing, technology, and religion, Afterward, they will write an acrostic poem summarizing what they have discovered about Africa's diversity. 4, Project Transparency 1.1A, which shows women exchanging goods in an open market in Cotonou, Benin, in 1991. Explain that the letter on the transparency image corresponds with a letter on Student Handout 1.1A, which indicates the location of the image. Have students identify the location of the transparency by finding on their map the letter corresponding to the transparency image. Allow approximately 30 seconds for them to examine the transparency. Then, have pairs discuss the question, What do you see in this image? Have them record elements of the image for each category on Student Handout 1,1A. Have students record details of the image that do not fit into any of the categories in the “other” category, For example, for Transparency 1.1A, students might write “African dress” and “western t-shirt” in the “clothing” category, “women selling yams in a market” in the “economy” category, and “young girl and grown-up women” in the “other” category. Use the Teacher's Guide to ‘Transparencies to give students more information about the image. Repeat this process for ‘Transparencies 1.1B through 1.1L, 5. Once students have examined all the transparencies, tell them they will now write a poem summarizing what they have discovered about Africa’s diversity. Project ‘Transparency Master 1.1B: Directions for Writing a Poem About Africa's Diversity. Tell students they will use their notes on Student Handout 1.1A to help them create their poem, Review the guidelines for the assignment with the class. (Option: You may want to quickly show the transparencies again (0 prepare students to write their poems.) ‘© Teachers? Comieulom Isto Modems Aten 3