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Young Architects at Play: STEM Activities for Young Children

Young Architects at Play: STEM Activities for Young Children

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Inizia a leggere
Lunghezza: 190 pagine2 ore

Descrizione

Ann Gadzikowski is an award-winning author of curriculum books, teaching, guides, classroom readers, and numerous publications for parents of young children and early childhood educators. Her book Robotics for Young Children won the 2018 Midwest Book Award in the Education category and her book Creating a Beautiful Mess won gold in 2015 National Parenting Publications Awards.
Ann Gadzikowski is a graduate of the Erikson Institute and has over 25 years of experience as a teacher and director of early childhood programs.
Her credentials in music and literature informed her work as the executive director of Preschool of the Arts, a Reggio-Emilia inspired school in Madison, WI. Ann developed expertise in robotics, computer science, and engineering through her role as early childhood coordinator for Northwestern University's Center for Talent Development. She is currently the director of preschool curriculum and content development for Encyclopedia Britannica.
Ann is a frequent speaker at professional conferences, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the National Association for Gifted Children.
Young Architects at Play is a guide for teachers and parents and includes a diverse variety of activities and resources. Projects involve both traditional classroom materials like blocks, as well as other loose parts like natural materials, found objects, cardboard, and authentic woodworking materials.
The art and science of architecture provides examples in our own neighborhoods and in children's picture books that inspire exciting construction projects in early childhood classrooms and at home.
Audience includes early childhood and elementary educators working with children ages 3–6, curriculum consultants, coaches, administrators, staff developers, there is potential for course adoption.
Example Activity
PROJECTS: NATURAL MATERIALS
Tunnels and Canals
Introduction: Have you ever observed a child digging a tunnel in a sandbox? Most children will keep digging, deeper and deeper, until their tunnel collapses. The same is true when children dig canals at a beach near the smooth surface where the water meets the sand. Children will keep digging and digging, hoping that their structure will hold the flow of water, only to find that the sides of the canal will collapse and the water will be absorbed into the sand. These engineering failures are an important rite of passage. Children learn quickly that sand alone is not strong enough to keep a tunnel from collapsing or to hold water in a canal.

Aspiring architects will enjoy learning that there must be some kind of reinforcing materials to make a sand structure strong enough to keep it from collapsing or leaking. Even very young children can be introduced to construction techniques that mirror the ways real tunnels and canals are designed and built.

Materials: In addition to sand—at a beach, in a sandbox, or in a sensory table—a variety of materials can be offered to children for playful explorations of tunnel-building and canal-digging techniques. The following suggested materials can be acquired at no cost (from recycling bins or donations from families) and for purchase or donation from a hardware store or home improvement store:
plastic containers, such as milk cartons or yogurt tubs, with the lids and bottoms paper towel tubes PVC pipes pieces of metal or plastic gutters pool noodles, whole (for tunnels) or sliced open (for canals) large pieces of aluminum foil or plastic wrap (for lining a canal)
Provocations & Invitations: “Cutaway” illustrations in picture books and nonfiction reference books, reveal interesting details about the structure of tunnels. For example, the picture book Sam and Dave Dig a Hole written by Mac Barnett and illu
Leggi altro
Young Architects at Play: STEM Activities for Young Children

Azioni libro

Inizia a leggere

Informazioni sul libro

Young Architects at Play: STEM Activities for Young Children

Lunghezza: 190 pagine2 ore

Descrizione

Ann Gadzikowski is an award-winning author of curriculum books, teaching, guides, classroom readers, and numerous publications for parents of young children and early childhood educators. Her book Robotics for Young Children won the 2018 Midwest Book Award in the Education category and her book Creating a Beautiful Mess won gold in 2015 National Parenting Publications Awards.
Ann Gadzikowski is a graduate of the Erikson Institute and has over 25 years of experience as a teacher and director of early childhood programs.
Her credentials in music and literature informed her work as the executive director of Preschool of the Arts, a Reggio-Emilia inspired school in Madison, WI. Ann developed expertise in robotics, computer science, and engineering through her role as early childhood coordinator for Northwestern University's Center for Talent Development. She is currently the director of preschool curriculum and content development for Encyclopedia Britannica.
Ann is a frequent speaker at professional conferences, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the National Association for Gifted Children.
Young Architects at Play is a guide for teachers and parents and includes a diverse variety of activities and resources. Projects involve both traditional classroom materials like blocks, as well as other loose parts like natural materials, found objects, cardboard, and authentic woodworking materials.
The art and science of architecture provides examples in our own neighborhoods and in children's picture books that inspire exciting construction projects in early childhood classrooms and at home.
Audience includes early childhood and elementary educators working with children ages 3–6, curriculum consultants, coaches, administrators, staff developers, there is potential for course adoption.
Example Activity
PROJECTS: NATURAL MATERIALS
Tunnels and Canals
Introduction: Have you ever observed a child digging a tunnel in a sandbox? Most children will keep digging, deeper and deeper, until their tunnel collapses. The same is true when children dig canals at a beach near the smooth surface where the water meets the sand. Children will keep digging and digging, hoping that their structure will hold the flow of water, only to find that the sides of the canal will collapse and the water will be absorbed into the sand. These engineering failures are an important rite of passage. Children learn quickly that sand alone is not strong enough to keep a tunnel from collapsing or to hold water in a canal.

Aspiring architects will enjoy learning that there must be some kind of reinforcing materials to make a sand structure strong enough to keep it from collapsing or leaking. Even very young children can be introduced to construction techniques that mirror the ways real tunnels and canals are designed and built.

Materials: In addition to sand—at a beach, in a sandbox, or in a sensory table—a variety of materials can be offered to children for playful explorations of tunnel-building and canal-digging techniques. The following suggested materials can be acquired at no cost (from recycling bins or donations from families) and for purchase or donation from a hardware store or home improvement store:
plastic containers, such as milk cartons or yogurt tubs, with the lids and bottoms paper towel tubes PVC pipes pieces of metal or plastic gutters pool noodles, whole (for tunnels) or sliced open (for canals) large pieces of aluminum foil or plastic wrap (for lining a canal)
Provocations & Invitations: “Cutaway” illustrations in picture books and nonfiction reference books, reveal interesting details about the structure of tunnels. For example, the picture book Sam and Dave Dig a Hole written by Mac Barnett and illu
Leggi altro