Goditi milioni di eBook, audiolibri, riviste e tanto altro ancora con una prova gratuita

Solo $11.99/mese al termine del periodo di prova. Cancella quando vuoi.

I racconti dell'Ohio
I racconti dell'Ohio
I racconti dell'Ohio
E-book271 pagine4 ore

I racconti dell'Ohio

Valutazione: 3 su 5 stelle

3/5

()

Leggi anteprima

Info su questo ebook

Winesburg, Ohio

A cura di Massimo Bacigalupo
Traduzione di Marina Fabbri
Edizione integrale

Questo classico della narrativa americana scava profondamente tra desideri repressi, conflitti, inquietudini e sentimenti custoditi nell’intimità, celati sotto l’apparenza di una vita pubblica rispettabile e abitudinaria dagli abitanti di Winesburg, cittadina dell’Ohio. Si tratta di un tema ricorrente anche in altre opere dello stesso periodo: la comune quotidianità delle province americane all’inizio dell’era industriale sconfessa il mito di un’America puritana e conformista. All’occhio attento e profondo di Anderson gli schemi ottimistici del positivismo, entro cui la società moderna vorrebbe incasellare le singole esistenze, si rivelano fragili e fallaci di fronte ai bisogni e alla libertà dell’individuo.

«Lo scrittore, un vecchio con i baffi bianchi, ebbe delle difficoltà per andare a letto. Le finestre della casa nella quale viveva erano in alto, ed egli voleva guardare gli alberi quando si svegliava al mattino. Venne un falegname ad accomodare il letto in maniera che fosse allo stesso livello della finestra.»


Sherwood Anderson

nacque a Camden, nell’Ohio, nel 1876. Pubblicò il suo primo romanzo, dichiaratamente autobiografico, nel 1916, ma raggiunse la piena fama nazionale solo con I racconti dell’Ohio, nel 1919: questa rimane la sua opera principale. Anderson fu particolarmente sensibile ai problemi relativi all’impatto che l’avvento dell’industrializzazione provocò nelle vite comuni, specialmente di chi viveva nella provincia.
LinguaItaliano
Data di uscita16 dic 2013
ISBN9788854138261
I racconti dell'Ohio
Leggi anteprima
Autore

Sherwood Anderson

Sherwood Anderson (1876­–1941) worked in advertising and owned a successful paint supply company before he suffered a nervous breakdown and abandoned his business career and his family to devote himself full time to writing. His groundbreaking story cycle, Winesburg, Ohio, is widely regarded as one of the greatest works of twentieth-century literature. Anderson, according to William Faulkner, “was the father of my generation of American writers.”

Correlato a I racconti dell'Ohio

Titoli di questa serie (40)

Visualizza altri

Ebook correlati

Categorie correlate

Recensioni su I racconti dell'Ohio

Valutazione: 3.045373665480427 su 5 stelle
3/5

1.124 valutazioni44 recensioni

Cosa ne pensi?

Tocca per valutare

La recensione deve contenere almeno 10 parole

  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    I really enjoyed this collection of short stories about the fictional town of Winesburg, Ohio. The way the story lines interconnected fascinated me. The descriptions of the townspeople's actions emotions were so intriguing that sometimes I felt like a voyeur.
  • Valutazione: 3 su 5 stelle
    3/5
    Oddly compelling set of very short stories set in rural America at the dawn of agricultural industrialization. Themes center on love, family religion, values and lack thereof. Also a kind of one hit wonder for Anderson.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    This has been on my mental list of "to-reads" for a very long time. As a native of Ohio, I have a familiarity with the area and and with Sherwood Anderson, so I was excited to finally read this fantastic piece of literature.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    I did not know what to think when I began reading Winesburg, Ohio. Hemingway's satire of the novel in The Torrents of Spring had somewhat tainted my first impression of the book. However, on completion I found the book thoughtful, interesting, and, aside from being somewhat vanilla in its description of life in a small American town, insightful. There is a coherence to the various stories that I found in Calvino's Marcolvaldo, despite the work appearing as a collection of short stories based around a protagonist and their relationship to the people, places and happenings in one particular town. I would not be surprised if Calvino was inspired by Anderson. But for the life of me I cannot understand Hemingway's criticism. Yet Anderson had a similar response from Faulkner. I think what makes this work so important is the background story, yet the work speaks to the reader in its own right.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    Much better than I expected. This book of short stories both showed its age and defied it. It was packed with more sex, more honestly confused people, and more ambiguous moments than I expected. At the same time, that sex, confusion, and ambiguity was more obviously privileged, white, and male than I was comfortable with.In the penultimate story, the narrator observes of a young woman, "it seemed to her that the world was full of meaningless people saying words." Perhaps this applies to all the characters in the novel, or perhaps we're encouraged to believe that young newspaper reporter who is nearly the main character and seems to be the chronicler of the town's adventures is a different sort of man.Such moments of keen insight were too often surrounded by passages that feel more subtly sinister in the winter of 2017: "The young man took Mary Hardy into his arms and kissed her. When she struggled and laughed, he but held her the more tightly. For an hour the contest between them went on..." Over and over, women are waiting for men to deliver them from their lives. Maybe that is merely an accurate reflection of a time when women couldn't vote, unmarried women could rarely own property or conduct business, and rarely attended college. But at several moments in the story, it all felt more sinister to me.I wish I'd read these stories a decade ago. I suspect I would have loved them without the complicated mixed emotions I have now.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    WINESBURG, OHIO-by Sherwood Anderson 479 -12706019I was skeptical of this book because I thought the title sounded dull and the generic title even more dull-dom. However, I decided to read it only because I am from a small town in Ohio. It turns out, I am happy I live in Ohio. The stories are detailed with realistic, well-rounded characters. Typically I steer away from short stories as many times it seems the endings are simple cutoff. This author delivers. His stories, though short, are well formed and entertaining. I was taken back to a different time of life, perhaps better in some ways as I read through.
  • Valutazione: 3 su 5 stelle
    3/5
    I believe Mr Anderson is a very talented writer. I also think he touched on many subjects of interest to me and others. But, for the most part, as charming as it was and well-written, I felt it all too soft for me, kind of like a Little House on the Prairie if you want to know the truth. Perhaps a bit too sentimental and even a bit too romantic for me. I like dirt and music that not only lifts me but spreads a soiling on me too permanent to rub off. But I shall see how the book progresses in the further regions of my mind as it gestates, or not, come what may. Certainly a book worth reading and definitely a precursor to what was to come in the literary field of its time.
  • Valutazione: 3 su 5 stelle
    3/5
    I waited too long to write my thoughts on this one and now I remember so little. But that in itself is a critique. Any book which doesn't stay with you was probably ho-hum at best.

    So which parts do I remember? Actually, I remember the four-part story "Godliness" best--the one about the grandfather who feels he has been chosen by God. I found it to be thought-provoking and suspenseful. Also memorable was the story about the minister who catches a glimpse of the neighbor woman and lusts after her.

    Ironically, many of the stories which focus on George Willard, the main character, escape me. The most memorable scenes from him were perhaps his final ones, as he walks around Winesburg by himself and also through the fair grounds with Helen.

    I thought I'd either love Winesburg or hate it; most people I know who have read it do. Instead, I fall in the middle. There were some great stories here, but overall, it just didn't capture me.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    THE BEST LAID PLANS

    A man and woman meet at a bar. They begin to talk and learn that each has trouble staying in long-term relationships because their sexual tastes are considered deviant. Excited, they decide to return to the woman’s apartment. After a bit of heavy petting, the woman excuses herself to her bedroom, promising to return wearing something more appropriate. Minutes pass and the woman emerges from her room in dominatrix attire to find the man nude, spent and smoking a cigarette. Incensed, she admonishes him for finishing without her. He replies, "Lady, I don’t know what your idea of kinky is but I just fucked your cat and shit in your purse."

    *****

    Bakersfield, California

    The man closes the book. He is at the car wash. His daughter dances in front of him, hopping from colored tile to colored tile in the run down, if air conditioned, interior of the building. He remembers the dreams of youth.

    He remembers standing on a hillside in Corona Del Mar and looking down upon a gigantic house under construction as his father tells him he is meant to be a writer. A plywood turret of what is to become a huge personal library is framed by the hazy blue of the Pacific Ocean. The house will be that of Dean Koontz, who would go on to write the Afterword for the 2005 Signet Classic Edition of Winesburg, Ohio.

    The man remembers boyhood, when the dream of being a writer was new. He is eleven. He and his parents have moved to the working class community of South Gate. For the first time, he applies himself to his schoolwork. He wins a city-wide essay contest and is rewarded with an article in the newspaper and a free lasagna dinner. His parents, whose marriage is failing, declare a temporary truce and whisper with one another about their destined-for-greatness son. Almost as impressively, a biologically precocious Latina he goes to school with named Claudia asks him to sleep with her. Blushing, he buries his head in his desk. He does not know what it is to sleep with a girl, he only knows that Catherine Bach of Dukes of Hazard fame has made him feel funny on several different occasions.

    One day he is accosted at the school bus stop by another boy named Jose who is jealous of the attentions of the resident alpha-female. Jose is beaten bloody and chased home by the boy. The school bus shows up just as Jose's family spill from their house, whipped into a bloodlust that the most fervent mujahideen would envy. As the eldest brother approaches the departing bus, his eyes meet the boy's through a window. The boy answers his foreign slanders by sticking out his tongue.

    The boy did not become a writer. The man he became thinks of all the things he has left unsaid and of all the feelings he has never shown. He is at the hardware store. He buys a drain snake because his Hispanic wife's hair has clogged the shower. He is mildly irked, but he loves her. He loves his daughter. He loves his life. Old friends are coming over today and he will laugh. He thinks that anyone who has read Winesburg, Ohio and given it less than four stars probably only has sex like Jesus is in the room working the lights.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    Reviewed April 1999 Difficult to begin as I had no idea other than it has something to do with a small town in Ohio, what it would be about. Anderson’s portraits of the secret lives of regular people is extremely interesting. Are most people’s secret wishes as gloomy as he portrays? Each chapter introduces a new person and their secrets, only the main character, George Willard is repeated throughout the book. I wanted to know more, to find out if these people finally found peace in their lives. But alas, like life, peace is an evolving thing. Only reason I heard of this book was it appeared in the top 100 of English language Novels of the 29th century. According to the editorial board of the Modern Library. It is listed as number 24
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    What an unbelievably beautiful book! It's the kind of book that makes you want to be a writer.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    A collection of interconnected short stories, set in the post-WWI years in a small town in Ohio. Some of the stories are a little bit dated, but still a good read--a slice of time and place.
  • Valutazione: 2 su 5 stelle
    2/5
    I trudged through this. I'm sure it was quite realistic and risque in 1919, but the repeated hand imagery annoyed me, as did the whole premise of trying to describe the inner emotional lives of interconnected people in vignettes. Give me PLOT, please! And don't tell me it was a coming of age story, George was an idiot.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    I often judge books by their covers, and well too I should: so much effort goes into their fabrication that it would be a shame not to at least factor their effect into a buying decision. I loved the cover of the Penguin edition immediately.The book itself I found surprisingly refreshing. A short collection of stories, the main character is really Winesburg itself, little town America personified. The book looks at each of the principal actors in the town's life in one particular generation, producing a story for each. They are tied neatly together into a beautiful little package; it's no wonder that this is such a popular piece of American fiction.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    Every town has its secrets. This one is better than "Paytan Place". A series of stories told by a young newspaper reporter, who observes the towns peaple, and gains more knowage than he wants to know about his friends and neighbors.