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CNC Tips and Techniques: A Reader for Programmers

CNC Tips and Techniques: A Reader for Programmers

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CNC Tips and Techniques: A Reader for Programmers

Lunghezza:
289 pagine
3 ore
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2013
ISBN:
9780831190521
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Overview

During the past decade, Peter Smid wrote dozens of column for Shop Talkmagazine that addressed the full gamut of CNC topics, such as tapping and threading and knurling; program length and memory needs; G-codes, M-functions, cycles, macros … and more still. 

Ever since Shop Talk ceased publication, these columns have been unavailable. Now, in CNC Tips and Techniques, we are delighted to bring them back—over 60 of the best of Peter’s columns --- all under one cover, so that you can have full and easy access to the advice Peter has been sharing during the past decade.

CNC Tips and Techniques is a treasure trove of Peter Smid’s “lost work” that is certain to be an invaluable addition to your CNC toolkit.  We hope the advice and instructions contained in these readings will help you do your job more efficiently and more effectively – and that you find them a good read besides. 

Features

  • Offers more than 60 focused columns which have been thoroughly reviewed since its initial publication and updated as needed to reflect ongoing changes in the field.
  • Columns are presented here in chronological order of when they first appeared.
  • Includes an alternative table of contents, organized by topic.
  • Provides several useful appendices and an extensive index.
  • Appeals to both veterans and newcomers with tips and techniques that can be applied at work and speed up the learning curve.
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2013
ISBN:
9780831190521
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore


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Anteprima del libro

CNC Tips and Techniques - Peter Smid

CNC Tips

and

Techniques

A Reader for Programmers

Peter Smid

Industrial Press Inc.

New York

Copyright

A full catalog record for this book will be available

from the Library of Congress.

ISBN: 978-0-8311-3472-3

Industrial Press, Inc.

989 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY 10018

Sponsoring Editor: John Carleo

Developmental Editor: Robert Weinstein

Interior Text and Cover Design: Janet Romano

Cover Photo courtesy of: James A. Harvey

Copyright © 2013 by Industrial Press

Printed in the United States of America.

All rights reserved.

This book, or any parts thereof, may not be reproduced,

stored in a retrieval system,

or transmitted in any form

without the permission of the publisher.

1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9    10

About the Book

Since 2000, Industrial Press has been fortunate to include Peter Smid among its family of authors. Both a popular and prolific author, Peter has anchored the CNC portion of our list, headed by the worldwide bestseller, CNC Programming Handbook, now in its third edition.

CNC Tips and Techniques: A Reader for Programmers is Peter’s fifth book with Industrial Press. During the past decade, in addition to all of his responsibilities as book author, consultant, and educator, Peter wrote a regular column for Shop Talk, a monthly magazine that offered metalworking solutions for the manufacturing and machining industry.

Peter wrote dozens of columns for Shop Talk, and his columns addressed the full gamut of CNC topics. They addressed tapping and threading and knurling. They addressed program length and memory needs. They addressed personnel issues, for example, the advantages and disadvantages of having programmers and operators as separate positions or merged. A variety of columns focused on G-codes, M-functions, cycles, and macros. And there were still more.

Ever since Shop Talk ceased publication, these columns have been unavailable. Now, in CNC Tips and Techniques, Industrial Press is delighted to bring them back to you —over 60 of the best of Peter’s columns —under one cover, so that you can have full and easy access to the advice Peter has been sharing over the past decade.

Each of these essays has been thoroughly reviewed since its initial publication and updated as needed to reflect ongoing changes in the field. They are presented here in chronological order of when they first appeared. An alternative table of contents, organized by topic, has been included, and at the back of the book you’ll also find several useful appendices and an extensive index.

We hope you’ll find CNC Tips and Techniques a valuable addition to your CNC library, and that Peter’s advice will make your work more efficient, more effective, and more rewarding.

Peter joins us in welcoming your feedback and questions. Simply write to us at info@industrialpress.com, and we’ll be sure to share your messages with him.

Industrial Press

April 2013

About the Author

Peter Smid has been a professional consultant, educator, and speaker, with many years of practical, hands-on experience in industry and education, including CNC and CAD/CAM applications on all levels. His consulting has focused on the practical use of CNC technology, part programming, Autocad®, Mastercam® and other CAD/CAM software, as well as advanced machining, tooling, setup, and many related fields. As a consultant he has successfully assisted several hundred companies with his wide-ranging knowledge.

Over the years, Peter has developed and delivered hundreds of customized educational programs to thousands of instructors and students at colleges and universities across United States, Canada and Europe, as well as to many manufacturing companies and private sector organizations. He has actively participated in many industrial trade shows, conferences, workshops and seminars.

Peter has also written many articles and in-house publications on the subject of CNC and CAD/CAM and for six years he wrote a monthly column in the Shop Talk magazine.

Peter Smid is the author of four other best-selling CNC books published by Industrial Press, Inc. and all books are also available as e-books. For more information, go to www.industrialpress.com.

CNC PROGRAMMING HANDBOOK

A Comprehensive Guide to Practical CNC Programming

Third Edition - ISBN 978-0-8311-3347-4

CNC CONTROL SETUP for MILLING AND TURNING

Mastering CNC Control Systems

ISBN 978-0-8311-3350-4

FANUC CNC CUSTOM MACROS

Programming Resources for Fanuc Custom Macro B Users

ISBN 978-0-8311-3157-9

CNC PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES

An Insider's Guide to Effective Methods and Applications

ISBN 978-0-8311-3185-2

Peter welcomes your comments, suggestions and questions.

Please write to him at info@industrialpress.com

Acknowledgements

I have made a number of references to several manufacturers and software developers in this book. It is only fair to list them below:

FANUC and CUSTOM MACRO or USER MACRO or MACRO B are registered trademarks of Fanuc Ltd, Japan

Mastercam is a registered trademark of CNC Software Inc.,Tolland, CT, USA

Edgecam is a registered trademark of Pathtrace, Inc., UK

NCPlot is a registered trademark of NCPlot LLC, Muskegon, MI, USA

AutoCad is a registered trademark of Autodesk, Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA

WINDOWS is a registered trademark of Microsoft, Inc., Redmond, WA, USA

There are other companies mentioned in this book.

Caterpillar, Fadal, Haas, Iscar, Makino, Mitsubishi, Okuma, Sandvik, Siemens Yasnac ... and some others that may have escaped me.

Also, my thanks to the publishing team at Industrial Press.

John Carleo, Janet Romano, Robert Weinstein

...without you, this book would not have happened

Table of Contents

Cover

Title Page

Copyright

About the Book

About the Author

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents by Topic

2004

CNC Turning — Why Are There So Many Errors?

Why Should I Know Manual Programming?

Running the First Part — Economically, That Is

Are You a CAM Machinist?

CAD/CAM or CAD and CAM?

Part Program Upgrading and Updating

Lathe Cycles — To Use or Not to Use?

Short Suggestions for Long Programs

Keep Records — Document Your Programs

Focus on Numbers

CNC Programmer/Operator — Should One Person Be Both?

Using CAM Software in Small Shops

2005

Minimizing Program Length

Conversion of Lathe Cycles

Shifting Program Zero — Part 1

Shifting Program Zero — Part 2

Threading Methods Compared

When 1 Thou Equals 65 Dollars

Alternate CNC Machine Selection

Standard and Rigid Tapping — Part 1

2006

Standard and Rigid Tapping — Part 2

Mastering M-Functions

Tool Length Setup — Three Methods

(Extreme) Power of Subprograms

Special Purpose G-Codes

Well-Structured Program Structure

Imaging a Mirror Image

Homeward Bound with G28

Block Skip Adds Flexibility

Simulating the Toolpath

Automatic Corner Breaking

Working in Planes

2007

A Case for Polar Coordinates

The Other Work Offset

Going Helical with Threads

G76: Two Formats, One Cycle

Multi-Start Threading

Automatic Tool Change — ATC

Maximum Tool Specifications

Control Features — Optional or Standard?

Fixed Cycles Repetition

Programming Process — When Is It Completed?

Quality in CNC Programming

Short Ideas and Observations

2008

Spindle Speed Control on CNC Lathes

Live Tooling on CNC Lathes

Trial Cut for Measuring

Easing Up on Calculations

Preventing Scrap with Offsets

Interpreting a CNC Program

Default Settings in Macros

Create Your Own G-Code

Scaling Option

Safety and CNC Programming

Special Tapping Macro

Setting Up a New Part

2009

Getting Rid of Chatter

Lathe Cycles G70–G72 — Part 1

Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

Limitations in Threading

Programming a Long Thread

Threading with G76 Cycle — Basics

Threading with G76 Cycle — Details

Feedrate Adjustment on Arcs

Knurling on CNC Lathes

Programming a Full Circle

Peck Drilling — Watching the Q

Appendices

Appendix 1 Interpreting a CNC Program

Appendix 2 Default Settings in Macros

Appendix 3 Create Your Own G-Cod

Appendix 4 Scaling Option

Appendix 5 Safety and CNC Programming

Appendix 6 Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

Index

Table of Contents by Topic

OPERATIONS

General

Running the First Part — Economically, That Is

Preventing Scrap with Offsets

Scaling Option

Setting Up a New Part

Getting Rid of Chatter

Peck Drilling — Watching the Q

Cutting

Trial Cut for Measuring

Knurling

Knurling on CNC Lathes

Lathes

Lathe Cycles — To Use or Not to Use?

Conversion of Lathe Cycles

Spindle Speed Control on CNC Lathes

Live Tooling on CNC Lathes

Lathe Cycles G70–G72 — Part 1

Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

Machines

Alternate CNC Machine Selection

Tapping

Standard and Rigid Tapping — Part 1

Standard and Rigid Tapping — Part 2

Threading

Threading Methods Compared

Going Helical with Threads

Multi-Start Threading

Limitations in Threading

Programming a Long Thread

Threading with G76 Cycle — Basics

Threading with G76 Cycle — Details

Tools

Tool Length Setup — Three Methods

Automatic Tool Change — ATC

Maximum Tool Specifications

Live Tooling on CNC Lathes

Turning

CNC Turning — Why Are There So Many Errors?

PROGRAMMING

Why Should I Know Manual Programming?

CAD/CAM or CAD and CAM?

Short Suggestions for Long Programs

Keep Records — Document Your Programs

Minimizing Program Length

Well-Structured Program Structure

Control Features — Optional or Standard?

Programming Process — When Is It Completed?

Quality in CNC Programming

Short Ideas and Observations

Interpreting a CNC Program

Safety and CNC Programming

Programming Techniques

Part Program Upgrading and Updating

Shifting Program Zero — Part 1

Shifting Program Zero — Part 2

Imaging a Mirror Image

Automatic Corner Breaking

The Other Work Offset

Programming a Long Thread

Feedrate Adjustment on Arcs

Programming a Full Circle

Subprograms

(Extreme) Power of Subprograms

Toolpaths

Simulating the Toolpath

CODES, FUNCTIONS, AND MACROS

Codes

Special Purpose G-Codes

Homeward Bound with G28

G76: Two Formats, One Cycle

Create Your Own G-Code

Lathe Cycles G70–G72 — Part 1

Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

Threading with G76 Cycle — Basics

Threading with G76 Cycle — Details

Functions

Mastering M-Functions

Block Skip Adds Flexibility

Macros

Default Settings in Macros

Special Tapping Macro

CYCLES

Lathe Cycles — To Use or Not to Use?

Conversion of Lathe Cycles

Fixed Cycles Repetition

Lathe Cycles G70–G72 — Part 1

Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

Threading with G76 Cycle — Basics

Threading with G76 Cycle — Details

THE MATHEMATICS OF CNC

Focus on Numbers

When 1 Thou Equals 65 Dollars

Easing Up on Calculations

Feedrate Adjustment on Arcs

CNC GEOMETRY

Working in Planes

A Case for Polar Coordinates

Programming a Full Circle

WORKING IN THE FIELD

Are You a CAM Machinist?

CNC Programmer/Operator — Should One Person Be Both?

Using CAM Software in Small Shops

APPENDICES

Appendix 1 Interpreting a CNC Program

Appendix 2 Default Settings in Macros

Appendix 3 Create Your Own G-Cod

Appendix 4 Scaling Option

Appendix 5 Safety and CNC Programming

Appendix 6 Lathe Cycles G70-G72 — Part 2

INDEX

Even in this era of CAD/CAM, many of the part programs that are available for two-axis CNC lathes are still developed manually. There is a good reason why. Purchasing a CAD/CAM system just for a lathe may not be the primary choice of many managers. Modern CNC lathes offer many time-saving features. For example, all centerline operations — such as drilling, reaming, and tapping — are simple point-to-point motions. Lengthy turning and boring cuts can be dramatically shortened by the use of very powerful machining cycles. Special cycles are also available for external and internal threading operations, even for machining castings and for simple grooving.

Yet, with all these programming tools at our disposal, many lathe programs suffer from a number of errors. It is not unusual to see frustrated CNC operators frantically changing programs at the machine, at a great cost to productivity. Why do so many lathe programs suffer this fate?

When I talk to programmers and operators, I get many opinions but seldom real answers. All it takes is a careful look at many of their lathe programs to see that the same type of error appears over and over again. Let’s look at them in groups, with some views on what can be done to prevent them:

Calculation Errors

For all their power and simplicity, no lathe cycle will provide calculations of the contour points. When an error is evaluated, typically the programmer either guessed or miscalculated. Brushing up on trigonometry is the first step toward improvement in this area. Of all the math subjects, trigonometry is relatively the highest knowledge programmer should possess. I know a few programmers who avoid this obstacle by asking their engineers to give them the contour points from Autocad or some other program.

Other types of calculation errors are accumulated ones caused by incorrect rounding. To avoid this problem, round only the final result — not the intermediate calculations. Many calculations can be confirmed by selecting a different mathematical approach.

Syntax Errors

Syntax errors often occur when the pesky letters O is used instead of the digit 0. These Os are the illegal characters that somehow find their way into the program. For example, the letter Y is not available on a two-axis CNC lathe. Fortunately, the control system will identify these errors.

Logical Errors

Watch very carefully for logical errors because the control system has no means to discover them. For example, a missing decimal point or a negative sign will give a totally new meaning to the programmed dimension. X1 is not the same as X1.0, and Z1.0 is not the same as Z-1.0.

Program Errors

Program errors that are fairly frequent are often those that can cause severe collisions. Making a tool change inside of a hole is one such error. Others include wrong tool or offset selection, excessive spindle speed or feedrate, selection of tool change position, and many others.

Offset Errors

This area is a fertile ground for many frustrations. In my experience, errors relating to the tool nose radius are at the top of this group. If a tool nose radius error is detected by the control system, the cause of this error is always the same — the programmed radius cannot fit into the area provided. This group also represents errors that may be the hardest to identify. Always check the offset settings. If the settings are correct, the program itself is at fault. This error often occurs when the tool nose radius is larger than an inside arc of the contour. It also occurs because of insufficient clearances. Because the most common tool nose radii are 1/64 (0.4 mm), 1/32 (0.8 mm) and 3/64 (1.2 mm), always provide a clearance that is at least twice the largest radius. Typically, 0.100 inches or 2.5 mm is sufficient as the minimum clearance. Keep in mind that this is per side, not on diameter.

Setup Errors

Setup errors are strictly the domain of the CNC lathe operator. Check all tools by running the program while the chuck is empty. Are there sufficient clearances? Can the tools index safely? Is the tailstock out of the way? Provide a sufficient grip of the workpiece in the chuck, then watch for the boring bar to exit from a hole safely. Running the first part in a dry run and single block modes may save the day.

Correcting Errors

This area deserves special mention. Many operators fail to identify the actual cause of an error. For example, if a drill does not provide the expected depth, is the programmed depth correct? Is the offset set correctly? Is it even possible that the drill was pushed slightly into the holder? Identifying the real cause of a problem is the first step towards its elimination.

I hope by reviewing some of the common errors found in many programs for CNC lathes that you can look at your own programs and see them in a much different light.

In older days, most CNC programs were developed manually, using simple common and everyday aids — pocket calculator, pencil, paper, and the proverbial five-pound eraser. Combine this human effort with punched tapes and some extra hardware, and you have what seems today a history long past. The tape is gone today, and even though many programmers still sharpen their pencils and purchase new erasers, the times have clearly changed in favor of computer-based programming, or CAM programming. True, CNC programming using personal computers started in the mid-1980s, but initial costs, the state of computer technology, long learning curves, and a lack of features prevented their wide usage for some time.

Using CNC software to make part programs is not a novelty. Feature rich software from a number of vendors offer the whole gamut of options — from entry level 2D to sophisticated 3D, solids, multi-axis machining, and multi-tasking — all available for desktop and laptop computers. Public and private institutions offer many training programs in this area, often in addition to standard CNC programming courses.

This brings up the ever more important question that many students ask: Why should I know manual programming, when I am learning Mastercam? Of course, there is software available other than Mastercam, but the question raises a good point. I wish I had a dollar for every time this question pops up in conversation or during a training session. So what gives?

Every CNC programmer has to possess certain skills. One skill I consider the most important is the ability to machine a part. Deciding on the best setup, selecting the most suitable tools, and creating safe and efficient machining operations is the core skill of any successful CNC programmer. The actual method of programming has nothing to do with it. Computers cannot make intelligent decisions.

Although the part program, in the form of a file or printed copy, is designed for a particular CNC system, we — the programmers and machine operators — have to be able to understand it.

Let me go through five main reasons for this statement:

Reason 1 — Myths about Post-Processors

Most CAM software comes with pre-configured postprocessors in the form of standard text files. These files are intended to be customized by the end user. There is no way for any software vendor to cover all possible combinations that exist between machine tools and control systems. In addition, vendors cannot predict the individual preferences of each user. As a postprocessor is used to format the final output of the part program, you still have to know what that output should be.

Reason 2 — At the Control with No Control

When the program runs at the CNC machine, you can watch it scroll by on the control display screen. Do you understand what all the letters and numbers mean? What do you do when there is an error in the program? CNC operators who can make minor (and sometimes even major) changes to the program are much valued by their employers. Some operators do not mind just pushing the buttons, but if you want a certain level of control and responsibility,

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