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Such Things Are: 'How different does his Lordship appear to me, to me he is all politesse''

Such Things Are: 'How different does his Lordship appear to me, to me he is all politesse''

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Such Things Are: 'How different does his Lordship appear to me, to me he is all politesse''

Lunghezza:
114 pagine
1 ora
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 1, 2019
ISBN:
9781787805378
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Elizabeth Simpson was born on 15th October 1753 at Stanningfield, near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.

Despite the fact that she suffered from a debilitating stammer she was determined to become an actress.

In April 1772, Elizabeth left, without permission, for London to pursue her chosen career. Although she was successful in obtaining parts her audiences, at first, found it difficult to admire her talents given her speech impediment. However, Elizabeth was diligent and hard-working on attempting to overcome this hurdle. She spent much time concentrating on pronunciation in order to eliminate the stammer. Her acting, although at times stilted, especially in monologues, gained praise for her approach for her well-developed characters.

That same year she married Joseph Inchbald and a few months later they appeared for the first time together on stage in ‘King Lear’. The following month they toured Scotland with the West Digges's theatre company. This was to continue for several years.

Completely unexpectedly Joseph died in June 1779. It was now in the years after her husband’s death that Elizabeth decided on a new literary path. With no attachments and acting taking up only some of her time she decided to write plays.

Her first play to be performed was ‘A Mogul Tale or, The Descent of the Balloon’, in 1784, in which she also played the leading female role of Selina. The play was premiered at the Haymarket Theatre.

One of the things that separated Elizabeth from other contemporary playwrights was her ability to translate plays from German and French into English for an audience that was ever-hungry for new works.

Her success as a playwright enabled Elizabeth to support herself and have no need of a husband to support her. Between 1784 and 1805 she had 19 of her comedies, sentimental dramas, and farces (many of them translations from the French) performed at London theatres. She is usually credited as Mrs Inchbald.

Mrs Elizabeth Inchbald died on 1st August 1821 in Kensington, London.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 1, 2019
ISBN:
9781787805378
Formato:
Libro

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Anteprima del libro

Such Things Are - Mrs Inchbald

Such Things Are by Mrs Inchbald

A PLAY, IN FIVE ACTS

AS PERFORMED AT THE THEATRE ROYAL, COVENT GARDEN

Elizabeth Simpson was born on 15th October 1753 at Stanningfield, near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. 

Despite the fact that she suffered from a debilitating stammer she was determined to become an actress.

In April 1772, Elizabeth left, without permission, for London to pursue her chosen career.  Although she was successful in obtaining parts her audiences, at first, found it difficult to admire her talents given her speech impediment.  However, Elizabeth was diligent and hard-working on attempting to overcome this hurdle. She spent much time concentrating on pronunciation in order to eliminate the stammer. Her acting, although at times stilted, especially in monologues, gained praise for her approach for her well-developed characters.

That same year she married Joseph Inchbald and a few months later they appeared for the first time together on stage in ‘King Lear’.  The following month they toured Scotland with the West Digges's theatre company.  This was to continue for several years.

Completely unexpectedly Joseph died in June 1779.  It was now in the years after her husband’s death that Elizabeth decided on a new literary path.  With no attachments and acting taking up only some of her time she decided to write plays.

Her first play to be performed was ‘A Mogul Tale or, The Descent of the Balloon’, in 1784, in which she also played the leading female role of Selina. The play was premiered at the Haymarket Theatre.

One of the things that separated Elizabeth from other contemporary playwrights was her ability to translate plays from German and French into English for an audience that was ever-hungry for new works.

Her success as a playwright enabled Elizabeth to support herself and have no need of a husband to support her.  Between 1784 and 1805 she had 19 of her comedies, sentimental dramas, and farces (many of them translations from the French) performed at London theatres. She is usually credited as Mrs Inchbald.

Mrs Elizabeth Inchbald died on 1st August 1821 in Kensington, London. 

Index of Contents

ADVERTISEMENT

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

TIME OF REPRESENTATION: Twelve Hours.

SUCH THINGS ARE

PROLOGUE

ACT I

SCENE I - A Parlour at Sir Luke Tremor's

ACT II

SCENE I - An Apartment at Sir Luke Tremor's

SCENE II - The Inside of a Prison

SCENE III - Another Part of the Prison

SCENE IV - The Former Prison Scene

ACT III

SCENE I - An Apartment at Sir Luke Tremor's

SCENE II - The Palace

ACT IV

SCENE I - An Apartment at Sir Luke's

SCENE II - The Garden

ACT V

SCENE I - The Prison

SCENE II - The First Prison Scene

SCENE III - The Council Chamber

SCENE IV - An Arch-way at the Top of the Stage

EPILOGUE

MRS INCHBALD – A SHORT BIOGRAPHY

MRS INCHBALD – A CONCISE BIBLIOGRAPHY

ADVERTISEMENT

The travels of an Englishman throughout Europe, and even in some parts of Asia, to soften the sorrows of the Prisoner, excited in the mind of the Author the subject of the following pages, which, formed into a dramatic story, have produced from the Theatre a profit far exceeding the usual pecuniary advantages arising from a successful Comedy.

The uncertainty in what part of the East the hero of the present piece was (at the time it was written) dispensing his benevolence, caused the Writer, after many researches and objections, to fix the scene on the island of Sumatra, where the English settlement, the system of government, and every description of the manners of the people, reconcile the incidents of the Play to the strictest degree of probability.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

MEN

Sultan    Mr. Farren

Lord Flint   Mr. Davies

Sir Luke Tremor  Mr. Quick

Mr. Twineall   Mr. Lewis

Mr. Haswell   Mr. Pope

Elvirus    Mr. Holman

Mr. Meanright   Mr. Macready

Zedan    Mr. Fearon

First Keeper   Mr. Thompson

Second Keeper   Mr. Cubitt

First Prisoner   Mr. Helme

Second Prisoner  Mr. Gardener

Guard    Mr. Blurton

Messenger   Mr. Ledger

WOMEN

Lady Tremor   Mrs. Mattocks

Aurelia    Miss Wilkinson

Female Prisoner Mrs. Pope

TIME OF REPRESENTATION: Twelve Hours.

SUCH THINGS ARE

PROLOGUE

Written by THOMAS VAUGHAN, Esq.

Spoken by Mr. HOLMAN.

How say you, critic Gods*, and you below**;

Are you all friends?—or here—and there—a foe?

Come to protect your literary trade,

Which Mrs. Scribble dares again invade—

But know you not—in all the fair ones do,

'Tis not to please themselves alone—but you.

Then who so churlish, or so cynic grown,

Would wish to change a simper for a frown?

Or who so jealous of their own dear quill,

Would point the paragraph her fame to kill?

Yet such there are, in this all-scribbling town,

And men of letters too—of some renown,

Who sicken at all merit but their own.

But sure 'twere more for Wit's—for Honour's sake,

To make the Drama's race—the give and take.

[Looking round the house.

My hint I see's approv'd—so pray begin it,

And praise us—roundly for the good things in it,

Nor let severity our faults expose,

When godlike Homer's self was known to doze.

But of the piece—Methinks I hear you hint,

Some dozen lines or more should give the tint—

"Tell how Sir John with Lady Betty's maid

Is caught intriguing at a masquerade;

Which Lady Betty, in a jealous fit,

Resents by flirting with Sir Ben—the cit.

Whose three-feet spouse, to modish follies bent,

Mistakes a six-feet Valet—for a Gent.

Whilst Miss, repugnant to her Guardian's plan,

Elopes in Breeches with her fav'rite man."

Such are the hints we read in Roscius' days,

By way of Prologue ushered in their plays.

But we, like Ministers and cautious spies,

In secret measures think—the merit lies.

Yet shall the Muse thus far unveil the plot—

This play was tragi-comically got,

Those sympathetic sorrows to impart

Which harmonize the feelings of the heart;

And may at least this humble merit boast,

A structure founded on fair Fancy's coast.

With you it rests that judgement to proclaim,

Which in the world must raise or sink it's fame.

Yet ere her judges sign their last report,

'Tis you—

[To the boxes.

—must recommend her to the Court;

Whose smiles, like Cynthia, in a winter's night,

Will cheer our wand'rer with a gleam of

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