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The Treatment

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The Treatment

valutazioni:
4/5 (15 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
500 pagine
8 ore
Pubblicato:
May 8, 2012
ISBN:
9780802194480
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Now a major motion picture: A boy’s abduction reawakens a haunted past for British detective Jack Caffery in this “deliciously chilling thriller” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).
 
In a quiet residential area in London, a couple is discovered bound and imprisoned in their own home. Savagely battered and severely dehydrated, the worst revelation is yet to come: Their eight-year-old son has been abducted.
 
When the boy’s body is found, forensic evidence reveals disturbing parallels to events in Det. Jack Caffery’s own past. As more evidence accumulates, Caffery struggles to maintain his professional distance. But the case is hurtling toward a terrifying conclusion that will force him to confront the demons he’s tried so hard and so long to bury . . .
 
“The most frightening book I’ve ever read.” —The Guardian
 
“Hayder handles procedural detail, dialogue, and volatile subject matter with powerful dexterity.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review
Pubblicato:
May 8, 2012
ISBN:
9780802194480
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

MO HAYDER is the author of the internationally bestselling novels Birdman, The Treatment, The Devil of Nanking, Pig Island, Ritual, Skin, Gone—which won the 2012 Edgar Award for best novel—Hanging Hill and Poppet. In 2011, she received the Crime Writers’ Association Dagger in the Library award. She lives in the Cotswolds, England. WEB: www.mohayder.net FACEBOOK: AuthorMoHayder

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4.0
15 valutazioni / 24 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    This is 2nd in Jack Cafferty series and is darker and more disturbing than the 1st. Even with the gritty and gruesomeness I will continue this series because Hayder’s writing is excellent. Pedophile and child abuse are hard to read about and the book is definitely not for the feign of heart. Jack learns more about his brother’s death and who killed Rory Peach. Recommended for those who love thrilling serial killer books.
  • (4/5)
    This was a difficult read, partially due to the heavy and disturbing theme, but made even more so as the story took place in the area I lived in for the first 20 years of my life. In fact spent many hours in the park mentioned throughout the book & where a body was discovered. In some sense it made it more real! Hopefully events in the book will lead to them being less depressive in the future.
  • (4/5)
    Hayder's books are truly, deeply dark -- in this case, also excellent and heartbreaking -- but I appreciate that she shows the real damage some people take in life and also the real resilience they may have. More, that sometimes damage and resilience are two sides of the same coin.
  • (4/5)
    deeply disturbing book but impossible to put down. I would recommend it to friends with a 'health warning' !
  • (4/5)
    Hayder's first Jack Caffery book, Birdman, has to rate as one of my top favourites. This book is really good but not quite up to Birdman standard. Very realistic, chilling and dark and I just couldn't put it down.Back Cover Blurb:Midsummer, and in an unassuming house on a quiet residential street on the edge of Brockwell Park in south London, a husband and wife are discovered, imprisoned in their own home. Badly dehydrated, they've been bound and beaten, and the husband is close to death. But worse is to come: their young son is missing.When DI Jack Caffery of the Met's AMIT squad is called in to investigate, the similarities to events in his own past make it impossible for him to view this new crime with the necessary detachment. And as Jack digs deeper, as he attempts to hold his own life together in the face of ever more disturbing revelations about both the past and the present, the real nightmare begins.....
  • (2/5)
    Ran out of library time to read it, which probably says something about its failure to engage me!
  • (5/5)
    It is a perfect summer day in london's up-market brockweel Park. Yet, behind the elegant facade of one house, a man and is wife, have been taken prisonner in their own home and their young son as disappeared. But the final horror of their terrifying ordeal's still to be revealed... Called to investigate, Jack Caffery tries desesperatly to make sense of the meager clues found at the crime scene. But the echoes of a devastating disappearance in his own past make it impossible for him to view the crime objectively. And as Jack digs deeper, as the disturbing parallels between the past and the present mount, the real nightmare begin...
  • (3/5)
    I read this when I was around 13, and can still trace elements of my occasional nightmares back to this book. It was very disturbing in a gratuitous/shock-value way, and though I found the book gripping, I finished it feeling like I'd finally gotten through an ordeal. It's the least enjoyment I've ever taken from a decently well-written novel. I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone I like.
  • (4/5)
    Better than the 1st book of the series.... Will definitely pick up the next book.
  • (4/5)
    This is the second hayder book I've read and I am impressed. Although some of the connections and the back story of the main character can be a little contrived the overall effect is very good. The treatment is a very engrossing story and despite its subject matter you always want to read on. The characters are identifiable and the whole story was played out at a speed hitch kept you interested without skirting any content. I think that many people would baulk at reading this book because of the subject matter but they would be missing out on an exciting read. I have to admit I may have been less likely to purchase the book had I known, but I just took a punt and was pleased I did.The treatment is cruel and horrific and some or indeed pretty much all of the story is horrendous, gritty and shocking but it is handled in such a way that it is still very readable and enjoyable despite the content. The story is tense and thrilling and I think everyone would find it utterly exciting.I will read some more of mo's books now and hope that I find myself equally engrossed by her other work.
  • (5/5)
    Treatment by Mo Hayder
    4.5 Stars

    Mo Hayder is definitely not scared to tackle subjects that a lot of people would prefer not to hear about. In fact, her stories verge on the horror genre. The Treatment is no exception. To sum up this book up I would use the words dark, twisted and disturbing.

    The horror starts with the discovery of the Peach family, who have been held captive in their house and their son molested over a period of days. When the police arrive at the scene the pedophile has vanished into the night along with young Rory Peach.

    The hopeless hunt for Rory brings up all of Caffery's feelings about Ewan, who is presumed dead after disappearing over two decades ago. The main suspect is a neighbor, Ivan Penderieki, but no evidence has ever been found to tie him to the case. Driven by his own guilt in Ewan's disappearance and being taunted by Penderecki, Caffery is very close to losing it on this case.

    Caffery comes to believe that another family is being victimized even though the police believe they have a suspect. This puts him at odds with his boss, Chief Inspector Daniella Souness. It also causes problems with his new girlfriend, Rebecca who suffers demons of her own. He's determined to follow every clue, discovering a web of pedophiles. The crime itself is gruesome. In this book we get to know a lot more about what happened to Ewan, and it's full of surprises. This story does not let up to the very end, and something new and grim is around every corner.

    Jack Caffery is one of the most absorbing characters I've read in a long time. He's complex, tortured and flawed and I'm enthralled with his story and what will happen in the future. My only caution to other readers about this book was that the level of cruelty done to the most innocent of victims was very painful to read.

    I look forward to Mo Hayder's next book. I think she's a master of dark, gritty stories but they are certainly not for anyone looking for a feel good, comfy mystery. The ending is absolutely horrifying!

    WARNING: This story is definitely worth reading as long as you don't mind graphic, and I mean GRAPHIC, sexual and violent content. Very dark, difficult subject matters.
  • (4/5)
    Great second instalment of the Jack Caffrey series. My interest in the books was piqued by the Flemish film adaptation and I'm glad to see that it was quite faithful to the original text. Hayder's style is kinetic and punchy, immersing you in the action from the very first page. She kept my interest throughout irrespective of having known the conclusion. She's proven to be adept at telling incredibly twisted, yet compellingly terrifying stories and I can't wait to dive into the next instalment.
  • (3/5)
    disturbing...but it does explain a lot of what I was missing in some of the later books. I wanted to keep reading, to find out the twists and turns, but because of the subject matter, I can't say this was an enjoyable read
  • (5/5)
    A man and his wife are found handcuffed in their home, severely dehydrated, the man badly beaten, and the wife's hands nearly severed from trying to get free. This is not the worst of it though, they have an eight year old son and he is missing. Jack Caffery is on the case and as he hunts for the missing boy he can't help but be haunted by the long ago disappearance of his own brother.This story slowly escalates into the most disturbing book I've ever read. Mo Hayder is a master of this genre. I found the tension almost unbearable. I quickly realized on the first evening that I could not read this book at night if I wished to sleep peacefully. I often found myself setting the book down just so I could catch my breath and let my heart stop pounding. I literally could not read fast enough at times. The subject matter is perverse and unsettling in the extreme. As I read I often wondered if it would become too much for me but Hayder never crosses that line.The narrative switches between several points of view, keeping the tension taught and the reader on the edge. There are many twists and turns and this is an intricate plot with many reveals along the way. Any future book I read in this genre is going to be held up to Ms Hayder as an example of the best. This book receives my highest recommendation for those with the stomach and the nerves for it.
  • (4/5)
    After reading Hayder's first book, Birdman, I wondered if she'd be a one hit wonder. She wasn't. The Treatment is a dark and disturbing book, mixing all that is wrong with the underworld in London in real life with the elements of Hayder's imagination.Jack Cafferey returns still tormented by the disappearance of his younger brother and is still spiralling rapidly out of control, the control we saw him lose at the end of the last book. Rebecca also makes a return confronting her own demons.The bad guys are real bad, but in the "they live next door" kind of way. The victims are like any one you know and the good guys show that sometimes there's a fine line between bad and good.Don't read this if you have a young family!
  • (4/5)
    The Treatment I suggest you read book #1 The Birdman before re-entering the world of DI Jack Caffery and his "Area Metropolitan Investigation Team". If you were able to handle the intensity of The Birdman, Book 2 will continue to develop characters you've met previously. This still is crime fiction-horror, so the word entertaining is probably not appropriate. There are well developed characters and a fast paced plot.....British....psychological suspense-horror
  • (2/5)
    From The Book cover:

    Midsummer, and in an unassuming house on a quiet residential street on the edge of Brockwell Park in south London, a husband and wife are discovered. Badly dehydrated, they've been bound and beaten, the husband is close to death. But worse is to come: their young son is missing.

    When DI Jack Caffery of the Met's AMIT squad is called in to investigate, the similarities to events in his own past make it impossible for him to view this new crime with the necessary detachment. And as Jack digs deeper, as he attempts to hold his own life together in the face of ever more disturbing revelations about both the past and the present, the real nightmare begins.

    My Thoughts:

    Be warned if you're intending to read this book that it has pedophiles in it...a seemingly endless chorus of them. That having been said...it is a dark, ugly, sadistic story about depravity... child murder... and florid insanity...and the old dog is left to die. If you are still here then let me say that I admire Mo Hayder's ability to write...but this was almost too much even for me who loves horror and suspense. I can endure some really gruesome drama, but Hayder just crosses too many lines...digs too deep in the muck... and finally chooses ugliness and despair when she could made choices that might have left the reader with some sense of hope instead of the sense of needing to shower. 2.5 &#9733 and a large bar of soap.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant - engaging and well written. I found this difficult to put down, but had to read in small chunks due to time restraints. For those with weak stomaches, this might not be the story for you. For everyone else, go for it an enjoy. I find Mo Hayder's writing style very gripping and her character development, for the most part, is very believable. However, I have struggled with the plausibility of current events, pertaining to the DI Jack Caffery back story a little, but forgave them due to there requisite nature for the story to work. Overall, highly recommended, but the tales are so dark that I'll have to read something light and inspiring as a follow up. :-)
  • (3/5)
    The Treatment, a novel. Mo Hayder. 2001. This is Hayder’s second Detective Jack Caffery novel and probably the last one I’ll read. Hayder’s villains are too evil and cruel for me which is saying something because I usually like grim, bloody thrillers or “chillers” as the Brits call them. Caffery is still haunted by the disappearance of his brother and the pedophile who took his brother. This case brings the horror back to him as the he uncovers similarities in both cases
  • (5/5)
    This shit is like soda. I'm getting addicted even though I know it's not really good for me and it makes my stomach kind of hurt.
  • (5/5)
    Abgründig und finster. Sehr fesselnd und spannend.
  • (5/5)
    The most complete success of the Caffery novels. Even more so than with other of the Caffery novels, the subject murders are particularly difficult to take, as they involve an aggravated level of pedophilia. The murders themselves almost play as a back drop to Caffery's attempt to unravel the mystery of his brother, who was abducted when Caffery was a youth, and whose abduction Caffery felt personally responsible. With a poetic realism, Caffery just misses discovering his brother who is incredulously still alive, but in a damaged state, misreading his own gut instinct while having to rely on a sordid female creature to make the connection. This near miss captures the meanness of fortune and essential element of Caffery. I found Caffery's brother's solitary death in an abandoned RV to be crushing, but more honest than if he had been found. Although the crimes are hard to stomach and stretch the bounds of pleasure-reading; overall, this is a powerful book -- the most powerful in the series.
  • (5/5)
    New to me series! Loved every minute of this one. This was actually the second in the series (Jack Caffery series), but was easily read as a stand alone. Now I need to go back to Book One and then continue on with the series. Highly recommend this one.
  • (3/5)
    This it the second novel featuring Detective Jack Caffery, however I haven’t read the first one. There are some references to the first, but there is also enough back story that you are not lost. I’m not sure if I’ll read Birdman but I have requested it from the library so we’ll see. This book opens with the imprisonment of a family and the abduction of their eight year son. Caffery’s brother was abducted at about the same age as this young boy, his brother was never found, the similarities in the event make this case difficult for Caffery since he has to try to solve the case and deal with his inner turmoil.The way this book is written we know what the criminal is planning and even who the next victims will be, we don’t know who the criminal is. Although the story is primarily told from Jacks’s viewpoint, we also get glimpses of what is going on with other people, eventually all these little parts come together. The ending is ironic and heartbreaking, but inevitable considering the people involved.I liked this book but I did not like the ending, however with the characters Mo Hayder has created any other ending would not have worked. It would have given the ending a thrown together feeling which many readers would object to. Since I don’t want to give anything away I will leave it at that.There are some disturbing elements in this story, it deals with the sexual abuse of children and child pornography and child murder which may upset some people. I though the writing was good, even with the dark subject it was written in a way that did not sensationalize it. The author keeps the feeling and actions of the people realistic although there is one part that is a little unnerving. The plot is solid, there are many threads started which are woven together during the story so that by the end they are all wrapped up, and the characters stay true to their created personalities. The story takes place in England and so there were some expressions and procedures that were foreign to me but it was not enough to effect my enjoyment of the book. I would recommend this book, but please take note of the warning above.