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Stacy (NHB Modern Plays)

Stacy (NHB Modern Plays)

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Stacy (NHB Modern Plays)

valutazioni:
4/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
75 pagine
56 minuti
Pubblicato:
Apr 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781780015873
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Rob finds life confusing in a world of unwritten rules. If there's no one around to tell him right from wrong, except for a copy of FHM and a call-centre supervisor, he just has to guess. But he's never been very lucky, and sometimes he gets his guesses very wrong.

This play was first staged at the Arcola Theatre, in 2007.

'a pin-sharp, brilliant piece of work' - Time Out, Critics' Choice

'a challenging, disturbing and distinctive new voice' - The Times

'This one man show will blow your socks off... one of the most entertaining nights I've had at the theatre' - London Lite

Pubblicato:
Apr 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781780015873
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Jack Thorne is a playwright and screenwriter. His plays for the stage include an adaptation of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (Old Vic, London, 2017); an adaptation of Büchner's Woyzeck (Old Vic, London, 2017); Junkyard (Headlong, Bristol Old Vic, Rose Theatre Kingston & Theatr Clwyd, 2017); Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Palace Theatre, London, 2016); The Solid Life of Sugar Water (Graeae and Theatre Royal Plymouth, 2015); Hope (Royal Court, London, 2015); adaptations of Let the Right One In (National Theatre of Scotland at Dundee Rep, the Royal Court and the Apollo Theatre, London, 2013/14) and Stuart: A Life Backwards (Underbelly, Edinburgh and tour, 2013); Mydidae (Soho, 2012; Trafalgar Studios, 2013); an adaptation of Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s The Physicists (Donmar Warehouse, 2012); Bunny (Underbelly, Edinburgh, 2010; Soho, 2011); 2nd May 1997 (Bush, 2009); When You Cure Me (Bush, 2005; Radio 3’s Drama on Three, 2006); Fanny and Faggot (Pleasance, Edinburgh, 2004 and 2007; Finborough, 2007; English Theatre of Bruges, 2007; Trafalgar Studios, 2007); and Stacy (Tron, 2006; Arcola, 2007; Trafalgar Studios, 2007). His radio plays include Left at the Angel (Radio 4, 2007), an adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (2009) and an original play People Snogging in Public Places (Radio 3’s Wire slot, 2009). He was a core writer in all three series of Skins (E4, Channel 4, BBC America), writing five episodes. His other TV writing includes National Treasure, The Last Panthers, Glue, The Fades (2012 BAFTA for Best Drama Series), Shameless, Cast-Offs, This is England ’86 (2011 Royal Television Society Award for Best Writer – Drama), This is England ’88, This is England ’90 and the thirty-minute drama The Spastic King. His work for film includes the features War Book, A Long Way Down, adapted from Nick Hornby’s novel, and The Scouting Book for Boys, which won him the Star of London Best Newcomer Award at the London Film Festival 2009.


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Stacy (NHB Modern Plays) - Jack Thorne

Jack Thorne

STACY

NICK HERN BOOKS

London

www.nickhernbooks.co.uk

Contents

Title Page

Introduction

Dedication

Original Production

Characters

STACY

About the Author

Copyright and Performing Rights Information

Introduction

So this is probably the most intimidating thing I’ve ever written.

I think I started writing plays as a way of expressing the things that I couldn’t say. I’m a constant idiot in conversation – I always seem to sound either smug or stupid. Writing plays was a way of winning the conversation by controlling the conversation. I became ‘super talk’ – the king of all arguments – impressing everyone with my wit and vivacity. Sadly, none of those plays were any good. I then went through a stage of utter self-hatred and destruction – where everything I wrote was about how disgusting I was as a human being and how much I hated the world and particularly me within the world. Those plays were still largely shit, but were slightly better. And then I think – I hope – I learnt how to write about other people – and then I think – I hope – I learnt how to write about myself again with a better sense of balance. Because these plays are, apologies in advance, overwhelmingly about me.

Anyway, this is my Plays: One but I’d written about twenty-two plays before the first play in this volume. I occasionally get them out and have a read – thinking maybe there’s a thought or an idea or even a turn of phrase that I could use for something new. There’s not. They’re dire. Even now I’m not quite sure why I persevered. Everyone told me to do something else – the criticism was wide-ranging, but mostly very critical. My endurance was partly due to love and partly due to utter dependence. I wrote my first play because I wanted to direct something at university and couldn’t afford the £65-a-night amateur fees. And from the moment I started writing, it was instant, I grew slightly obsessive about it. I was a terrible writer, but utterly obsessive. Before I got married I was a sixteen-hour-a-day, seven-days-a-week man. Now I’m ten-hours-a-day and my wife and I have a contract which states that I take at least half a day off a week. All of which is to say, I am entirely psychologically dependent on writing, it gives me stability when all else is failing. And I spend way too much time doing it.

I was taught, as many others were, by Simon Stephens as part of the Royal Court Young Writers’ Programme. He taught us all a huge amount, but there was one thing he said in particular which I’ve puzzled over ever since – that every writer has a myth. A story that they return to again and again – something which drives them – something which gives their plays a sense of themselves. That it’s not a writer’s job to identify his or her myth but that it’s there – in the background – if you look for it. Simon, when I asked him, said, after quite a lot of thinking, he thought his own myth was probably ‘listen to children’ – though he said he wasn’t sure and other people might be better judges, and when I’ve mentioned it to him since he had no recollection of thinking that. But watching his work through the prism of ‘listen to children’ I’ve found quite a beautiful experience. I don’t know what my myth is, and I’d struggle to nail it down, but I think it has something to do with help – what help is, and the struggle we all go through trying to help others, and perhaps what failure to help looks and feels like. Like I say, I could be wrong. And it feels self-important even guessing at it. But there is something about thinking that there’s something I’m trying to say – that I have a myth – that’s always felt somehow useful to me. Both in looking at others and worrying about myself.

The first time I thought I might have a future as a writer was as a result of a phone call from an amazing woman called Teresa Topolski (who Bunny is dedicated to). I’d been sending off letters to theatres for a while, and unsurprisingly not getting very encouraging letters back. In fact, I once got the opportunity to look through the Bush Theatre’s ‘reader pile’ and discovered the notes written on my first play I sent them which concluded with ‘This play is, on the whole, irritating.’ But Tessa thankfully saw something even in these terrible irritating plays – and called me up – this is the days before mobile phones – on my mum and dad’s phone – and said she thought my plays were interesting (I’d sent the same three to her at the Tricycle) – I remember playing the message to my little sister approximately twenty-four times. Every play I subsequently wrote I sent to her, for about three years, and she constantly stayed interested and un-irritated by me. She built my

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