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General Theory of Relativity: The Commonwealth and International Library: Selected Readings in Physics

General Theory of Relativity: The Commonwealth and International Library: Selected Readings in Physics

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General Theory of Relativity: The Commonwealth and International Library: Selected Readings in Physics

valutazioni:
3/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
312 pagine
Pubblicato:
Oct 22, 2013
ISBN:
9781483154657
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

General Theory of Relativity deals with the general theory of relativity and covers topics ranging from the principle of equivalence and the space-theory of matter to the hypotheses which lie at the bases of geometry, along with the effect of gravitation on the propagation of light. The motion of particles in general relativity theory is also discussed.
This book is comprised of 14 chapters and begins with a review of the principle of equivalence, paying particular attention to the question of the existence of inertial frames in Newtonian mechanics. The beginnings and foundations of general relativity are then considered, together with modern developments in the field. Subsequent chapters explore the general notion of multiply extended magnitudes; the space-theory of matter; the effect of gravitation on light propagation; gravitational waves and the motion of particles in general relativity theory; and homogeneity and covariance. An invariant formulation of gravitational radiation theory is also presented. The last three chapters examine continued gravitational contraction, a spinor approach to general relativity, and gravitational red-shift in nuclear resonance.
This monograph will be of interest to physicists and mathematicians.
Pubblicato:
Oct 22, 2013
ISBN:
9781483154657
Formato:
Libro

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General Theory of Relativity - C. W. Kilmister

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  • (3/5)
    This book has two parts. The second part consisits of some reprints of papers that are relevant to general relativity theory. The first part is an introduction to general relativity and an explanation of how those papers reprinted in the second part fit in to the whole picture. The first part reads more like a Scientific American article and is very easy to read, possibly because at the time the book was published (1973) most people were totally unacquainted with general relativity. The author gives a very good intuitive explanation of many points which are glossed over in later books. The basic ideas behind the Petrov classification is an example of one of these points. Highlights of the reprint section include a paper by Riemann (translated by W. K. Clifford) which gives Riemann's orginal ideas on the possible physical significance of Riemannian geometry. Riemann points out that we can by experiment determine the geometry of space on the middle scale in which we live, but the geometry of space on the infinitely large scale and the infinitely small scale would be very challenging. Indeed, interest has now focused on the large (cosmology) and given up on the infinitely small. The latter is now given over to quantum theories which essentially hide the details. A reprinted part of a paper by Clfford provides an example what might be done in the latter context. He presents a view that all matter and its actions are describable in terms of extremely small variations in the geometry of space. Another reprinted paper by Einstein presents elaborates on that theme. In this paper (summarizing work from the thirties and fourties) it is shown that the motion of particles (represented by singularities) in response to force fields can be accounted by the interaction of the fields. The mathematics of this interaction is accomplished by surface integrals over very small spherical surfaces surrounding (and thus isolating) the singularity. A similar idea was presented by Weyl about 1925 and is called the agens theory of matter. It would be interesting to know the interaction of Weyl and Einstein on this subject. This book is an interesting sidelight on the development of general relativity.