Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée"

Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée"

Leggi anteprima

Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée"

valutazioni:
1/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
291 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Jul 12, 2012
ISBN:
9780486132747
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Over 1,000 illustrations, meticulously reproduced from rare issues of renowned fashion magazine, present a striking array of women’s fashions from 1860 to 1914: elegant evening and dinner gowns, stylish daywear, wedding ensembles, bathing costumes, mourning clothes, cycling outfits and much more; plus detailed renderings of shoes, hats, parasols, and other accessories.
Pubblicato:
Jul 12, 2012
ISBN:
9780486132747
Formato:
Libro

Correlato a Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée"

Titoli di questa serie (60)
Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée" - Dover Publications

DOVER BOOKS ON FASHION

HATS: A HISTORY OF FASHION IN HEADWEAR, Hilda Amphlett. (0-486-42746-3) BRITISH COSTUME FROM EARLIEST TIMES TO 1820, Mrs. Charles H. Ashdown. (0-486-41813-8) VICTORIAN FASHIONS AND COSTUMES FROM HARPER’S BAZAR, 1867-1898, Stella Blum. (0-486-22990-4)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS OF THE TWENTIES AS PICTURED IN SEARS AND OTHER CATALOGS, Edited by Stella Blum. (0-486-24134-3)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS OF THE THIRTIES As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by Stella Blum. (0-486-25108-X)

A PICTORIAL HISTORY OF COSTUME FROM ANCIENT TIMES TO THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: WITH OVER 1900 ILLUSTRATED COSTUMES, INCLUDING 1000 IN FULL COLOR, Wolfgang Bruhn and Max Tilke. (0-486-43542-3)

THE HISTORY OF UNDERCLOTHES, C. Willett Cunnington and Phillis Cunnington. (0-486-27124-2)

AMERICAN VICTORIAN COSTUME IN EARLY PHOTOGRAPHS, Priscilla Harris Dalrymple. (0-486-26533-1)

WOMEN’S HATS, HEADDRESSES AND HAIRSTYLES: WITH 453 ILLUSTRATIONS, MEDIEVAL TO MODERN, Georgine de Courtais. (0-486-44850-9)

WOMEN’S COSTUME OF THE ANCIENT WORLD: 700 FULL-COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS, Paul Louis de Giafferri. (0-486-4452 7-5)

HISTORIC COSTUMES AND How TO MAKE THEM, Mary Fernald and E. Shenton. (0-486-44906-8)

TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY FASHION PATTERNS AND TAILORING TECHNIQUES, S. S. Gordon. (0-486-41241-5)

WHAT PEOPLE WORE: 1,800 ILLUSTRATIONS FROM ANCIENT TIMES TO THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY, Douglas Gorsline. (0-486-28162-0)

AUTHENTIC VICTORIAN FASHION PATTERNS: A COMPLETE LADY’S WARDROBE, Edited by Kristina Harris. (0-486-40721-7)

AUTHENTIC VICTORIAN DRESSMAKING TECHNIQUES, Edited by Kristina Harris. (0-486-40485-4)

VICTORIAN FASHION IN AMERICA: 264 VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS, Edited by Kristina Harris. (0-486-41814-6)

MEDIEVAL COSTUME AND How TO RECREATE IT, Dorothy Hartley. (0-486-42985-7)

THE KEYSTONE JACKET AND DRESS CUTTER: AN 1895 GUIDE TO WOMEN’S TAILORING, Chas. Hecklinger. Preface by Kristina Seleshanko. (0-486-45105-4)

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE FASHION: 90 FULL-COLOR PLATES, Raphaël Jacquemin. (0-486-45776-1)

PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF HISTORIC COSTUME: 1200 FULL-COLOR FIGURES, Albert Kretschmer and Karl

Rohrbach. (0-486-46142-4)

COSTUME DESIGN IN THE MOVIES: AN ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO THE WORK OF 157 GREAT DESIGNERS, Elizabeth Leese.

(0-486-26548-X)

ACCESSORIES OF DRESS: AN ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA, Katherine Lester and Bess Viola Oerke.

(0-486-43378-1)

THE CORSET AND THE CRINOLINE: AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY, W. B. Lord. (0-486-46186-6)

JAPANESE KIMONO DESIGNS, Shôjirô Nomura and Tsutomu Ema. (0-486-44426-0)

VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN FASHIONS FROM LA MODE ILLUSTRÉE, JoAnne Olian. (0-486-29711-X)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS OF THE SIXTIES As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by JoAnne Olian. (0-486-40120-0)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS OF THE FORTIES As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by JoAnne Olian. (0-486-26918-3)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS OF THE FIFTIES As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by Joanne Olian. (0-486-42219-4)

EVERYDAY FASHIONS, 1909-1920, As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by JoAnne Olian. (0-486-28628-2)

CHILDREN’S FASHIONS 1900-1950 As PICTURED IN SEARS CATALOGS, Edited by JoAnne Olian. (0-486-42325-5)

FULL-COLOR SOURCEBOOK OF FRENCH FASHION: 15TH TO 19TH CENTURIES, Pauquet Frères. (0-486-42838-9)

A DICTIONARY OF COSTUME AND FASHION: HISTORIC AND MODERN, Mary Brooks Picken. (0-486-40294-0)

AN ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY OF HISTORIC COSTUME, James Robinson Planché. (0-486-42323-9)

60 CIVIL WAR-ERA FASHION PATTERNS, Kristina Seleshanko. (0-486-46176-9)

THE MODE IN HATS AND HEADDRESS: A HISTORICAL SURVEY WITH 198 PLATES, R. Turner Wilcox. (0-486-46762-7)

See every Dover book in print at www.doverpublications.com

Copyright

Copyright © 1998 by Dover Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bibliographical Note

Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from La Mode Illustrée is a new work, first published by Dover Publications, Inc., in 1998.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Victorian and Edwardian fashions from La Mode Illustrée / edited and with an introduction by JoAnne Olian.

p. cm.

9780486132747

1. Costume—France—History—19th century. 2. Costume—France—History— 20th century. 3. Costume—Great Britain—History—19th century. 4. Costume—Great Britain—History—20th century. 5. Mode illustrée—History. I. Olian, JoAnne. II. La Mode illustreé.

GT871.V53 1998

391’.00944’09034—dc21

98-29316

CIP

Manufactured in the United States by Courier Corporation

29711X05

www.doverpublications.com

Book design by Carol Belanger Grafton

Table of Contents

DOVER BOOKS ON FASHION

Title Page

Copyright Page

Introduction

Glossary

DOVER BOOKS ON ANTIQUES AND COLLECTING

Introduction

Dress for women is the first of arts, the one that contains all the others.

It is her offensive armor, her harmonious palette.

OCTAVE UZANNE, La Femme à Paris (1894)

The symbiotic relationship between fashion and the arts has never been more apparent than in nineteenth-century France where dress was described in rhapsodic and minute detail by Balzac, Zola, Proust, Baudelaire, and Stephane Mallarmé who, in 1874, founded the short-lived magazine, La Dernière Mode, for which he covered fashion under the pseudonyms Marguerite de Ponty, Zizy, and Miss Satin. Baudelaire, exploring the relationship between women and dress, glorified woman thus: [she is not] for the artist . . . merely the female of the human species. She is rather a goddess . . . the vast, iridescent clouds of draperies in which she envelops herself . . . are, so to speak, the attributes and the pedestal of divinity.... Show me the man who . . . has not enjoyed, in the most detached manner, the sight of a skillfully composed toilette, and has not carried away with him an image inseparable from the beauty of the woman wearing it, thus making the two, the woman and the dress, an indivisible whole. The paintings of his contemporaries Tissot, Beraud, et al were graphic testimony to Baudelaire’s question, What poet would dare, in painting the pleasure caused by the appearance of a beauty, to separate the woman from her costume? Even Monet and Cezanne based canvases on engraved fashion plates from La Mode Illustrée and Le Petit Courrier des Dames.

The period of the Second Empire and the Belle Époque—slightly more than half a century beginning with the founding of La Mode Illustrée in 1860 and ending with the onset of World War I in 1914 —was a time of unprecedented change, characterized by a deluge of technological innovations that dramatically transformed daily life, from horse to iron horse to horseless carriage. Mass production methods enabled products to be turned out in quantities sufficient to supply a burgeoning consumer class. A new breed of merchant shrewdly concocted a climate of perpetual temptation, leading to the creation of new businesses catering to the insatiable, fast-changing desires of an affluent middle class. Before 1860, department stores were already established in New York and Paris selling confections (ready-made garments, consisting mostly of outerwear and undergarments at first), dress goods, and the astonishing assortment of accessories deemed vital to the sartorial well-being of the nineteenth-century customer. Only dresses were still made up individually by a dressmaker or the wearer herself. This traditional method of dressmaking was revolutionized by Charles Worth, the Englishman who founded the French haute couture industry. A man of his time, he was both artist and entrepreneur. He devised a system of standardized interchangeable components that allowed one pattern piece to be used for any number of designs and utilized the sewing machine for joining parts and sewing seams, reserving handwork for finishing and embroidery. Worth presented seasonal collections, showed them on live mannequins, signed his work with a label, and, by 1871, had over 1,200 workers in his employ.

The first illustration in this book was engraved after a photograph of the Empress Eugénie, one of a series by Disderi, a Paris photographer who conceived the carte de visite format in 1854 and was selling over 2,000 such postcards daily by 1862. By the date of the photograph, Worth would probably have been presented to the empress by Princess Pauline Metternich, the fashionable wife of the Austrian ambassador, and Eugénie might well be wearing one of his designs. The serendipitous confluence of the commanding Charles Worth and the compelling Eugénie set the sartorial tone for the glittering society of the Second Empire. Frederick Nietzsche may well have been thinking of the duo when he wrote, Women believe in their dressmakers as in their god. In emulation of Louis XIV, who commanded his courtiers

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Victorian and Edwardian Fashions from "La Mode Illustrée"

1.0
1 valutazioni / 0 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori