Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
Stand Down: A J.P. Beaumont Novella

Stand Down: A J.P. Beaumont Novella

Leggi anteprima

Stand Down: A J.P. Beaumont Novella

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (15 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
88 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Jul 21, 2015
ISBN:
9780062418487
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

An e-original novella from New York Times bestselling author J. A. Jance.

Life has shifted for J. P. Beaumont. After a tragic accident that devastated—and ultimately disbanded—his Special Homicide Investigation Team, he accepts that he has left homicide detection behind at this point, but he has a lot of unanticipated free time on his hands. He's keeping busy with renovations on the new house that he and his wife, Mel Soames, the newly appointed chief of police in Bellingham, Washington, have bought. But new fixtures and paint palettes can occupy only so much of Beau's daily life, and Mel is encouraging him to return to where he is needed: investigating crimes.

In the meantime, she is struggling to gain control of her new situation, cast into a department where some are welcoming—and some are not. It's been a few months, and the tension in the police department is rising, but Beau realizes Mel has to tackle things in her own way, so he refrains from advising. But when Beau shows up one afternoon to survey the construction at their new house and finds Mel's car there but no sign of her, his investigative instincts kick in. Suddenly he's back in the game—except this time, his heart is on the line as well as his professional dignity.

Pubblicato:
Jul 21, 2015
ISBN:
9780062418487
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

J.A. Jance is the New York Times bestelling author of the J.P Beaumont series, the Joanna Brady series, Edge of Evil, and three stand-alone thrillers. Born in South Dakota and brought up in Bisbee, Arizona, Jance lives with her husband in Seattle, Washington, and Tuscan, Arizona.

Correlato a Stand Down

Libri correlati

Categorie correlate

Anteprima del libro

Stand Down - J. A. Jance

Stand Down

A J. P. BEAUMONT NOVELLA

J. A. JANCE

Dedication

For Audrey and Celeste

Contents

Dedication

Stand Down

An Excerpt from Dance of the Bones

About the Author

Also by J. A. Jance

Copyright

About the Publisher

Stand Down

AS THE MACHINE spat out the last drops of coffee that Monday morning, a tiny whiff of hairspray wafted down the hallway from Mel’s bathroom and mingled with the aroma of freshly ground beans and the distinctive fragrance of Hoppe’s #9 gun-­cleaning solvent. While she was down the hall getting ready to go to work, I was in the kitchen cleaning our weapons—­her standard-­issue Smith & Wesson and her backup Glock, along with my own Glock as well.

It’s what I did these Monday mornings—­clean our weapons—­while she got ready to go to work in Bellingham and while I got ready to do whatever it is I do these days. I don’t suppose the architect who designed our penthouse condo imagined that our granite countertop would often double as a gun-­cleaning workshop, but then again, where else would I do this necessary, lifesaving task—­the living room? It only takes once to learn how completely a tiny piece of pistol innards can disappear into the hidden reaches of a plush living-­room carpet. And cleaning her weapons every Monday morning was my small contribution toward keeping her safe.

The hairspray told me that within a minute or so, my wife, Mel, would emerge from her bathroom dressed, made up, properly coiffed, and ready to go out into the world as the city of Bellingham’s newly hired police chief.

While I was married to my first wife, Karen, we’d shared a single bathroom, with a single washbasin and a combination tub and shower. By the time Anne Corley, my second wife, came into my life, however briefly, I still had a single bathroom, but it contained two washbasins, and a tub/shower combo. Shortly after Mel Soames and I tied the knot, it became clear that even a deluxe bathroom, one with two basins, a tub, and a stand-­alone shower, simply wouldn’t cut it.

Mel had solved the problem by collecting her lotions and potions and decamping to the far end of the hallway and turning the guest bedroom, bathroom, and closet into her private domain. At the time, since we were both working the same shifts for the same outfit, having separate bathrooms worked for us. Now things had changed. She had a relatively new job. As for me? I was struggling with the uncomfortable realities of being newly and quite unwillingly retired.

Mel came down the hall, looking very official in her spiffy police chief’s uniform and a pair of sensible, low-­heeled pumps.

Good morning, gorgeous, I told her. I knew she had a meeting with the Bellingham mayor, the city manager, and city council that morning, and I also knew she was dreading it. Girls in uniform always turn me on.

She stopped and glared at me. Don’t lie, she said. You know I look like hell.

The truth is, and much to my surprise, she did look like hell. There were dark shadows under her eyes that even deftly applied makeup didn’t quite cover. I had spent the night lying next to her in bed as she had tossed and turned her way through the hours. During my years in law enforcement, including twenty or so at Seattle P.D., I had never once entertained the idea of climbing the treacherous career ladder from being an ordinary cop to becoming one of the brass. Mel was different. She had been on the cop-­to-­brass path in a previous jurisdiction when those plans had been derailed by a complicated divorce. That detour had brought her to Washington State, where we had met.

Second chances don’t come along all that often. This time one had. Earlier the previous fall, Mel had been offered her dream job as chief of police in Bellingham, Washington, a small city some ninety miles north of Seattle. The moment the job was offered, I knew she wanted to take it, so I supported her in that decision. I had, however, tried to warn her that making the transition from being part of a team of investigators to being top dog in a new department wouldn’t be an easy one. It turns out I was right.

Previously, Mel and I had both worked for the Washington State Attorney General, Ross Connors, on his Special Homicide Investigation Team or, as we had been perversely proud to call it, the S.H.I.T. squad. Ross had been the best boss either of us ever had, bar none. He had expected his ­people to deliver excellent results while, at the same time, giving his teams of investigators an amazing amount of autonomy. Ross was a political animal, but politics stopped at the door to his office.

I knew even before Mel sat down at her desk that she would find herself in a political quagmire and probably with a dearth of support from the rank and file. Unfortunately, that was proving to be the case. Mel’s second-­in-­command, Assistant Chief Austin Manson, evidently thought the chief’s job should have been his for the asking, and he hadn’t been happy when she was chosen over him. From what she’d said, I had gleaned that Manson was a much-­divorced kind of guy with a rancorous and still-­ongoing child-­custody battle in his background, along with a few anger-­management issues besides. Mel had spent the whole weekend distant and preoccupied. I suspected Manson was the root of the problem, but she hadn’t been willing to discuss it. I hadn’t brought it up, and neither had she.

Now, even without being Mirandized, I understood that in this dicey situation, anything I said could and would be held against me. Besides, handing out a dose of I told you so, bright and early in the morning, is never a good way to start a new day or week. I couldn’t come right out and tell Mel that she should just bust Austin Manson back to the gang and get it over with. And I sure as hell didn’t see myself in the role of Sir Galahad, riding in on my white charger to intervene on her behalf, so that morning, I took the line of least resistance.

Coffee’s ready, I said noncommittally, shoving her newly cleaned weapons across the counter. Once she had stowed them in their appropriate holsters, I handed over Mel’s favorite mug, loaded with fresh coffee. This should do the trick.

Mel gave me the benefit of a small, rueful smile. Thanks, she said, taking a tentative sip. Coffee is just what the doctor ordered.

That hint of a smile was enough to make

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Stand Down

3.5
15 valutazioni / 17 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This is my first Jance novel, and I must say I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It combined an interesting old murder case in which the wrong man was convicted, a more recent smuggling/murder/kidnapping case, interwoven with wonderful Native American culture and folklore. Great read.
  • (3/5)
    Not a bad story, though the interweaving of the native mythology was a little heavy.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book free from GoodReads.This book is being marketed on the gimmick that it is in both the Brandon Walker and JP Beaumont series which is fine but Beaumont doesn't really factor in much and any Seattle cop could have been substituted. This isn't a criticism of the book, which reads quite well--in fact the best of the few Jance novels that I've read---but rather the need for gimmicky marketing.I liked this book right from the start where a series of crimes began in 1970 with an old ex-con desert dweller. The book then transitions to the current day, but keeps looking back to the past for hints on why that initial crime shaped the present and how one murder would eventually affect many people. Jance does a great job of making the various characters interesting.
  • (4/5)
    J.A. Jance's latest novel bring protagonists from two of her series, Brandon Walker in Arizona and J. Beaumont in Seattle. Although, not quite as adept as Tony Hillerman in bringing native culture and stories into her mysteries, she does an admirable job in having medical doctor, Indian shaman, Lani, November between the two cultures. People who have not read Jance's former mysteries, may need more than the background given in the story. It was an enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    This is my first book by Jance and it came through the Goodreads First Reads and I am happy that it did. This is a full-bodied mystery which makes me want to read others of the series because the characters are to well defined and the story keeps your interest. Good one.J. Robert Ewbank author "John Wesley, Natural Man, and the Isms" "Wesley's Wars" "To Whom It May Concern" and "Tell me about the United Methodist Church"
  • (3/5)
    I probably would have rated this higher if not for the disappointment of the insignificant role Beau played. Advertising this as a J P Beaumont book is misleading. It is a good story and should have been called an entry in the Walker series. The Walker characters are interesting to visit again after five years.
  • (4/5)
    Jance has combined two of her major characters, Brandon Walker and J.P. Beaumont, into one novel. (Walker figures much more predominantly.) A cold homicide investigation from back in the 1970's suddenly becomes very much front-burner and gets the juices of two "old" lawmen sizzling again. This was the audio version, and frankly, it was a very confusing listen because the narrator used the same tone of voice for all characters. Major scene changes occurred with scarcely a breath in-between. While this might work fine on the written page, it was very confusion when delivered in audio format. I would read the book and forget the audio if I had it to do over.
  • (3/5)
    Dance of the Bones by J.A. Jance is a 2015 William Morrow publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I have read books from three of Jance's series, Beaumont being my all time favorite character. I have not read any of the books about the Walker family , this being my first introduction to the characters from that series. This book is marketed as a Beaumont novel- listing it as the 22nd in that series, but that is a little bit misleading, since Beaumont makes little more than a cameo appearance here. This is definitely Brandon Walker's show. There are several threads running through this novel, but the main story line involves a man convicted of a crime he may be innocent of, a man Brandon Walker put behind bars. So, after all these years, Brandon finds himself once more embroiled in what is most likely a cold case, and after discovering a connection to another old case, Brandon reaches out to J.P. Beaumont, who just happens to have a little time on his hands. There are a lot of characters in this story and at times I felt a little lost. This could be due to my lack of familiarity with the Walker series, but I usually find it difficult to keep up with a large cast of characters, no matter what. However, the plot is not all that complicated, so it wasn't that hard to follow, actually. However, the story doesn't flow smoothly, is jagged and disjointed all the way up to the midway mark. There are too many flashbacks, for lack of a better word, for one thing, which made it hard to maintain my focus on the main thread. The Native American story that began each chapter was a nice touch, and is very interesting and I liked the way the reservation traditions was woven into the story, especially concerning Gabe. Once I got familiar with all the characters, and their roles, I was able to relax into the story more and once I reached the halfway point, I could see things starting to come together and the writing tightened up a great deal in the last half of the book, enabling me to became more engrossed in the story. This was not my favorite book by this author, but it did introduce me to the Walker's and I liked them well enough to want to catch up with them someday. Although, it got off to a pretty rocky start, the story ended up being enjoyable enough, in the end.
  • (3/5)
    As a rule I love J.A. Jance's books, but Dance of the Bones is not one of her best-- and J.P. Beaumont fans will be disappointed, since he plays a crucial (but very small) role.Jance's Walker family series set in the Tucson, Arizona area have always used many legends of the Tohono O'odham people. Normally I enjoy reading them, but in this case they kept dragging me out of the story-- even if they did pertain to two of my favorite characters, Gabe Ortiz and Lani Walker-Pardee. Speaking of characters, the bad guy needed to be more hands-on. Always having minions doing the dirty work sapped the killer's evil mojo. Instead of fear or anxiety, I felt irritation.With so many interconnected loops of plot, reading Dance of the Bones was like stepping in the middle of a nest of rattlesnakes. Lots of distraction, occasional confusion, and a feeling that the story didn't live up to the often beautiful way Jance uses the English language.
  • (3/5)
    OK but forced crossover between two seriess. The complex band distrcting native lore beginning each chapter did not help. Good try at something that could have been interesting. More mayhem and murder than mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Prospector Amos Warren was gunned down in the desert many years ago; Sheriff Brandon Walker arrested John Lassiter who, in due time, was convicted of the crime. Imprisoned ever since, he has steadfastly maintained his innocence and has refused to accept a time-served plea deal worked out by The Last Chance organization, a deal that would give him his freedom. He wants the real murderer to be found so his name can be cleared; he will not plead guilty for something he did not do. Lassiter asks Brandon Walker to work with The Last Chance group and look into the case, to find the one who really murdered his friend, Amos.When Brandon discovers a link between the Warren murder and an unsolved cold case in Seattle, retired detective J.P. Beaumont becomes involved in the investigation. But things take an unexpected turn when two brothers are executed out in the desert and two other boys disappear. Can the two veteran cops find the missing pieces that connect the two cases and solve the mystery before the teens lose their lives?The beginning of each chapter presents a portion of an Indian tale and the weaving of the Tohono O’odham culture, myth, and beliefs throughout the story adds depth and richness to the narrative. Crisp writing and well-drawn characters keep the suspense building and although readers are clued in to the identity of Warren’s murderer, there are more than enough plot twists to keep the pages turning.Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    In 1970, Arizona sheriff Brandon Walker had arrested John Lassiter for the murder of Amos Warren, a man Lassiter had once considered like a father. Lassiter is still in prison in 2015 and suffering from MS but, when offered a plea deal, he refuses. He wants Walker, who is now retired and working for a group that reviews cold cases, to look into Warren’s murder to find the real killer. At first reluctant, as he looks deeper into it, Walker begins to have doubts about the conviction. He discovers a link between the Lassiter case and an unsolved homicide in Seattle. He contacts retired Seattle detective JP Beaumont to help him unravel what is turning out to be a very far-reaching mystery. When two boys disappear from the Tohono O’odham reservation where Walker’s daughter Lani and her husband Dan Pardee live, Walker is convinced this is somehow tied in and he has very little time left to solve the case if there is any hope of finding them alive. Then Lani disappears…In Dance of the Bones, author J.A. Jance brings two of her most popular detectives out of retirement and they work very well together to solve one of the most challenging cases either has ever faced. With a plot full of twists and turns and infused with the legends and culture of the Tohono O’odham people, Jance has created a very intelligent, entertaining, and suspenseful novel, one that keeps the reader’s attention from the first page and never lets up until the end.
  • (4/5)
    IN, Anything that starts out with a fight over trashy women and treasure is only a good hot mess in my opinion. This read is definitely a treasure over trash. Jance has not always been on my reading radar but I look forward to going back and catching up with her characters. That said, you don’t need to be a series follower to enjoy this but you will want to join her flock. The mystery is character driven and strong and somewhat gritty. I couldn’t help thinking of James Lee Burke and Craig Johnson. However, I like seeing a queen bee added to my references! Now, back to the beginning with Beamont and Brandon for me…Provided by #tlcbooktours
  • (4/5)
    DANCE OF THE BONES by J A JanceJance brings two of her detectives together in this latest mystery. Brandon Walker in the Southwest is asked by the daughter of a convicted murderer to reopen her father’s case. Combining Native American lore with tough detective work Walker brings J P Beaumont in Seattle into the mystery of two longtime friends, a lost treasure, a scheming woman, a long ago murder and several very fresh murders.Jance uses the talents of both detectives to advance the story and solve the mystery. Personally, I found the Native American tale sections that began each chapter to be distracting. As usual her plotting is tight and the characters are real as are the conversations. A good read.4 of 5 stars
  • (3/5)
    Ava Martin set him up. John Lassiter has been serving years for murdering Amos Warren in March 1970; a crime he didn’t commit. Now it’s March 2015. Lassiter refuses to accept a plea deal. He’ll never confess to a crime he was not guilty of. Instead, he calls on the arresting officer, Sheriff Brandon Walker, to look into it further. Walker has since retired, but is working with TLC (The Last Chance), a group that has been successful with reviewing old cases and proving the innocence of some prisoners. Unexpectedly, Walker discovers a link to another homicide in Seattle. He contacts J.P. Beaumont, a retired Seattle detective. The two begin sharing resources. Then, more recently, two boys from the Tohono O’odham reservation in Tucson, AZ go missing.I like that the author combined two great series detectives to work with each other. Dance of the Bones was #22 of the J.P. Beaumont series and #5 of the Brandon Walker series. There is a stronger emphasis on Walker than Beaumont. I thought the action was lagging and there was a blurb at the beginning of each chapter of Tohono O’odham Indian Lore which didn’t seem to add any real benefit to the overall story. It is suspenseful and the reader will want to know how it all ends as there are a few twists thrown in. Rating: 3 out of 5.
  • (3/5)
    From Book Cover:

    Years ago, Amos Warren, a prospector, was gunned down out in the desert and Sheriff Brandon Walker made the arrest in the case. Now, the retired Walker is called in when the alleged killer, John Lassiter, refuses to accept a plea deal that would release him from prison with time served. Lassiter wants Brandon and The Last Chance to find Amos’s “real” killer and clear his name. Sixteen hundred miles to the north in Seattle, J.P. Beaumont is at loose ends after the Special Homicide Investigation Team, affectionately known as S.H.I.T., has been unexpectedly and completely disbanded. When Brandon discovers that there are links between Lassiter’s case and an unsolved case in Seattle, he comes to Beau for help. Those two cases suddenly become hot when two young boys from the reservation, one of them with close ties to the Walker family, go missing. Can two seasoned cops, working together, decipher the missing pieces in time to keep them alive?

    My Thoughts:

    I have read books from all three of J.A. Jance's series with Beaumont being my all time favorite character. I had thought with the conclusion of the last Beaumont book that it read like she was ending this series...so when this one came along I early awaited it. However...I found that this book though marketed as a Beaumont novel and listing it as the 22nd in that series... it is a tad misleading since Beaumont makes little more than a cameo appearance. This is definitely Brandon Walker's show. The story doesn't flow smoothly at all. It is jagged and disjointed all the way up to the midway mark with way too many flashbacks making it hard to maintain your focus on the main thread. Since I am not a huge fan of the Walker series and having so little Beaumont in the story, I found I was forcing myself to finish it.
  • (4/5)
    Picking up the latest J.A. Jance book is like settling down on the porch to catch up on the latest with an old friend. That latest is her new book, Dance of the Bones. And the old friends? Well, this is the 22nd book for J.P. Beaumont and the 5th book featuring members of the Walker family.Detective Brandon Walker is retired as is Special Investigator J.P. Beaumont. 1600 miles separate them, but a cold case from 40 years ago, brought to light with new evidence from The Last Chance group will have them working together. Faithful Beaumont fans, take note - Brandon has the lead role in this novel.Prospector Amos Warren and his partner Big Bad John Lassiter had a violent argument in a bar full of witnesses. When Warren's body is found, it is Lassister who is convicted. Except - we know who the real killer is - the opening prologue details Warren's death. The reader is along for the ride as the two men try to track down the real murderer. Knowing 'whodunit' early on did not detract at all from my enjoyment of the book.Readers not familiar with the Walker clan and their friends may find the first few chapters a bit busy - there are many characters and the relationships go back many years. (Dr. Lani Walker is my favourite) But, Jance does provide enough backstory that the reader will be quickly brought up to speed.The Walkers live in Pima County, Arizona. Every chapter opens with lore and legends from the Tohono O'odham, people of the desert, that mirrors much that is happening in the book. I really enjoyed these and the way that Jance wove First Nations culture into her book.Jance's mysteries are not cozy, but they're not difficult overly difficult to suss out either. For me, it is the characters that draw me to Jance's writing. It's comfortable and comforting to reconnect with characters I've enjoyed over the years. And I'm always curious as to their lives will evolve from book to book. This melding of two series with a new cold case group may provide many opportunities for other crossovers.