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Explore Rapala Product. Selected Articles

Explore Rapala Product. Selected Articles

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Explore Rapala Product. Selected Articles

Lunghezza:
100 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
May 23, 2015
ISBN:
9781311427120
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Rapala VMC Corporation together with its brands is the largest manufacturer of fishing tackle in the world. Unfortunately, some of the products offered by Rapala VMC Corporation (hereinafter Rapala) do not meet scientific data. The book “Explore Rapala Product” discovers some scientific problems connected with the Rapala’s products.

The Chapter 1 of the book is devoted to describe the properties of acoustic fishing lures manufactured by Rapala, Bill Lewis, Daiwa and other international companies. It is shown that noisy sounds emited by rattling and clacking wobblers are mismatched on their parameters with the hearing abilities of generalist fish (like perch, pikes, zanders) and squids. Furthermore, these sounds are fully masked by the heavy ambient noises in the typical water habitats. In the additional field tests, no statistic data have been obtained to confirm that Rapala wobblers, Blue Fox spinners and other lures with the mechanical acoustic devices are more effective than the visually similar but silent lures.

In the Chapter 2 of the book, pheromone based feeding attractants elaborated by the U.K. government agency named the Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) in the partnership with Kiotech International PLC for the purposes of the recreational fishing, commercial fishing and aquaculture are considered. In the area of recreational fishing, these attractants are promoted worldwide by Marukyu Co. (Japan), Rapala VMC Corporation and some other companies of the national level. It is shown in the field experiments with the collection of statistic data that Marukyu’s Ultrabite α, Rapala’s Trigger X, Blue Fox’s Dr. Juice Super Juice and other pheromone base attractants are not effective or species selective.

For comparison, it is shown how natural alarm pheromones and predator odors (kairomones) can be used in the practice (to attract pikes, to separate age groups of cyprinid fish).

The book is presented in the form of selected articles prepared at different times. For readers, this leads to some repetition but such redundancy is useful for memorizing the content of articles.

Pubblicato:
May 23, 2015
ISBN:
9781311427120
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Dr. Nick Yurchenko has professional interests in the physical chemistry, general and applied ecology, ethology (one of the biological sciences that studies animal behaviour), sustainable recreational fishing and general sustainability. He has received PhD in an area of physical chemistry in The National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv, Ukraine. Having deep knowledge in ecology of fish together with the good fishing practice across the European and other regions, he is an enthusiast of the sustainable development of recreational fishing. In addition, Dr. Nick Yurchenko is making significant efforts to promote the concept of the United Green Nations 2050, the most powerful modern concept of the global sustainable development.

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Anteprima del libro

Explore Rapala Product. Selected Articles - Nick Yurchenko

Explore Rapala Product

Selected Articles

By Dr. Nick Yurchenko

Kyiv © 2015

Table of Contents

Summary

Chapter 1. Acoustic Lures and Their Properties

Noisy sounds of some lures can not be perceived by generalist fish

Noisy sounds of some lures are masked by ambient noises in fish habitats

Predatory fish are indifferent towards clacking lures

Classic Vibrax: an incurable acoustic impotent

Rattling lures are useless for luring squids

Chapter 2. Pheromone Attractants in Recreational Fishing

Pheromone based feeding attractants: adventure continues

Feeding responses of zanders to alarm pheromones

Feeding responses of pikes to alarm pheromones

Feeding responses of catfish to alarm pheromones

Pheromone attractants in selective fishing

Various lures with gel attractants

Pheromone repellents in selective fishing: alarm cues

Pheromone repellents in selective fishing: predator odors

Summary

Rapala VMC Corporation together with its brands is the largest manufacturer of fishing tackle in the world. Unfortunately, some of the products offered by Rapala VMC Corporation (hereinafter Rapala) do not meet scientific data. The book Explore Rapala Product discovers some scientific problems connected with the Rapala’s products.

The Chapter 1 of the book is devoted to describe the properties of acoustic fishing lures manufactured by Rapala, Bill Lewis, Daiwa and other international companies. It is shown that noisy sounds emited by rattling and clacking wobblers are mismatched on their parameters with the hearing abilities of generalist fish (like perch, pikes, zanders) and squids. Furthermore, these sounds are fully masked by the heavy ambient noises in the typical water habitats. In the additional field tests, no statistic data have been obtained to confirm that Rapala wobblers, Blue Fox spinners and other lures with the mechanical acoustic devices are more effective than the visually similar but silent lures.

In the Chapter 2 of the book, pheromone based feeding attractants elaborated by the U.K. government agency named the Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) in the partnership with Kiotech International PLC for the purposes of the recreational fishing, commercial fishing and aquaculture are considered. In the area of recreational fishing, these attractants are promoted worldwide by Marukyu Co. (Japan), Rapala VMC Corporation and some other companies of the national level. It is shown in the field experiments with the collection of statistic data that Marukyu’s Ultrabite α, Rapala’s Trigger X, Blue Fox’s Dr. Juice Super Juice and other pheromone base attractants are not effective or species selective.

For comparison, it is shown how natural alarm pheromones and predator odors (kairomones) can be used in the practice (to attract pikes, to separate age groups of cyprinid fish).

The book is presented in the form of selected articles prepared at different times. For readers, this leads to some repetition but such redundancy is useful for memorizing the content of articles.

Chapter 1. Acoustic Lures and Their Properties

Noisy sounds of some lures can not be perceived by generalist fish

Numerous companies offer for many years rattling wobblers and clacking wobblers positioning them as more attractive than silent lures.

Technically, rattling wobblers have the plastic chambers with the several small metal beads while clacking models have the metal chambers with one metal ball. Generally, clacking wobblers emite (thanks to their one-ball all-metal construction) more rhythmic, somewhat louder but substantially higher frequency sounds than rattling models of the similar size.

Rapala Rattlin’ are classic examples of rattling wobblers. Various models of Rapala Clackin’ are typical clacking wobblers.

On the other hand, glass, plastic and metal rattles with the several or one inner metal beads (balls) are also produced as independent accessories for fishing lures. These rattles are recommended as removable mechanical acoustic devices for hard lures, soft lures, various lures for jig fishing (like Storm Rattle Jigging Craw) and other lures.

Even so, the effectiveness of these rattles has never been verified.

Acoustic research

To our knowledge, scientific studies of the properties of acoustic fishing lures are occasional.

According to Joseph Olsen’s tests in the laboratory (Cetacean Research Technology), Rat-L-Trap wobblers (produced by Bill Lewis Lures, USA) emit noisy sounds similar to sounds produced by the scattering fish schools. But these comparative data say nothing about the effectiveness of rattling lures (Liv-N-Sound program powered by Bill Lewis Lures) to catch predatory fish in the natural habitats.

Noisy swimming & artificial sounds

Moulton (1960) has played swimming sounds of the large school (500 units) of the hog-mouth fry, Anchoviella choerostoma, and observed the behaviour of young horse-eye jack, Caranx latus. These sounds excite C. latus which show quickened searching movements of an undirected type, in addition young predators may join Anchoviella schools to feed the members of the school. In the same context, Japanese amberjack, or yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata, can be attracted to the surface from deep layers by swimming sounds of conspecifics (for review, see Yan et al., 2010).

Clearly, artificial noisy sounds of one small rattling lure of prey fish size (usually 5-9 cm) cannot be equal to natural swimming sounds produced by the huge schools of small prey fish or large predators.

Parker, 1912 (cited by Protasov, 1965) has studied the influence of loud noisy sounds produced by shaking bundles of nails in the wooden pool. Two species, namely scups, Stenotomus chrysops, and northern kingfish, Menticirrhus saxatilis (both belong to Perciformes), avoid these sounds while other two species, namely northern sea robins (gurnards), Prionotus carolinus and Prionotus strigatus (both belong to Scorpaeniformes), are attracted by these sounds.

Generally, noisy sounds are repellent or much less attractive for fish than rhythmic sounds even masked by heavy ambient noises (Protasov, 1965).

Generalists: Great Perciformes & Esociformes Group

Largemouth bass and other species popular

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