Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
The Importance of Being Earnest

The Importance of Being Earnest

Leggi anteprima

The Importance of Being Earnest

valutazioni:
4/5 (2,487 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
112 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Mar 30, 2015
ISBN:
9781623958657
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People is a play by Oscar Wilde. First performed in 1895, the play is a satire of Victorian culture and social obligations. This play is witty and funny and is the most popular and enduring of Oscar Wilde's plays.
This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it.

Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes



Pubblicato:
Mar 30, 2015
ISBN:
9781623958657
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. Celebrated on both sides of the Atlantic for his wit, he is rumored to have informed a customs agent upon his arrival in America, “I have nothing to declare but my genius.” Wilde’s health and reputation were destroyed by his imprisonment for “gross indecency” in 1895, and he died in poverty a few years after his release. Today, his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and his play, The Importance of Being Earnest, are recognized as masterpieces of English literature.  

Correlato a The Importance of Being Earnest

Leggi altro di Oscar Wilde
Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di The Importance of Being Earnest

4.0
2487 valutazioni / 91 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (1/5)
    A cute little trifle, just a middle-of-the-road blip, though. At least now I can say I’ve been exposed to it, and exposure is good - unless you’re arrested for it, or die from it.
  • (4/5)
    I've always enjoyed this play and couldn't turn down the opportunity to listen to this audio production with James Marsters (SPIKE!) in one of the lead roles. The play remains as funny and charming as ever, and while not all of the actors rocked the English accent as well as others, it was a delightful and fast listen. Highly recommended.
  • (2/5)
    zeer flauw, vol klassieke Wilde-oneliners. Misschien moet ik het nog eens herlezen.
  • (4/5)
    A classic.
  • (1/5)
    A cute little trifle, just a middle-of-the-road blip, though. At least now I can say I’ve been exposed to it, and exposure is good - unless you’re arrested for it, or die from it.
  • (4/5)
    Even though I have seen and read the play a few times, THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST bears up under repeated scrutiny. The performance by L.A. Theater Works (starring James Marsters) had me laughing aloud, delivering the lines with excellent comic timing and all the appropriate absurdity. As an audio-only performance, the listener might expect to feel cheated in not being able to see the actors, but it's a testament to Oscar Wilde's writing and the performers that nothing was lost in this rendition. My only quibble was the inclusion of an interview with the director afterward:It simply wasn't interesting.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic. I admit I was a Wilde newbie, and now I'm kicking myself for not reading this sooner. Super short read (60 pages on my Nook) and they flew by. Not the usual play read, that's for sure (Ugh Shakespeare). Thoroughly enjoyed the wit and banter between the characters and fascinated by Wilde's life in general. Loved.
  • (4/5)
    5442. The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde (read 8 Feb 2017) I have read this before now but never in its own book, and have seen the movie and seen it performed. But I wanted it to be in my list of books read so when I came across a booklet containing only the work itself I decided to read it in that form. It is outrageously funny, but of course not as funny as seeing it performed. But one can't help laughing. A masterpiece indeed.
  • (5/5)
    I've read the screen play.
    It is an absolute gem of characterisation and dialogue. Full of humour and wit and worth reading again every once in a while. An uplifting experience I can't recommend highly enough.
    Go ahead and treat yourself, it not a lot to buy on ebook readers.
  • (5/5)
    I love this more with each rereading...
  • (5/5)
    You can’t beat Oscar Wilde when it comes to witty dialogue. The playwright mastered the art form of clever repartee and The Importance of Being Earnest is the best example of that talent.Two bachelors, Jack and Algernon, both find themselves pretending to be someone they are not in order to get what they want. Their actions cause confusion and cat fights when two ladies, Gwendolen and Cecily find themselves falling for the fictional “Earnest.” Top it off with the indomitable Lady Bracknell, whose matchmaking skills rely heavily on evaluating someone’s social standing and you’ve got a recipe for hilarity. I’ve always loved this play and rereading it was a treat. I also had the chance to finally see it performed in May and I loved it. That version set the story in the 1990s instead of the 1890s, but the text was exactly the same, which reminded me that romantic comedies really haven’t changed too much. This play also contains many of Wilde’s most infamous lines. Here’s a few of my favorites:“I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.” “To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.”“I'll bet you anything you like that half an hour after they have met, they will be calling each other sister.Women only do that when they have called each other a lot of other things first.”BOTTOM LINE: Read it! It’s a quick and delightful play.
  • (5/5)
    Oscar Wilde's wit is brilliant and unmatched.
  • (5/5)
    This is a very different portrait of Victorian England. A play where every protagonist is an antagonist, and vice versa. There are no bad guys, there are no good guys, there are only people. Oscar Wilde's characters have not the unforgettable personalities of Dickens nor the impressive realism of Tolstoy, yet they are somehow undeniably human. Lovable, relatable, susceptible, and somewhat incorrigible. This is a satire, an attempt to poke fun at himself and his culture. Wilde jabs and jokes from the title to the last sentence. You cannot go a paragraph without encountering some witty line or clever pun. His main character (Jack) is a picture of the Victorian dandy: Elegant, refined, philanthropic - yet also ( surprise surprise) a hypocrite and a liar. The other lead man, Algernon ( who most definitely steals the show in my humble opinion) is less of a picturesque Victorian gentleman. He is more dandy with a heavy helping of Oscar's own "wilde" personality" ( excuse the horrid pun, I think one pun is permissible in a review of the "punniest play in the English language"). He leads the same sort of life as Jack, and yet his actions do not effect others quite as profoundly. He is a soloist, his mistakes are all games, and as such are stamped with approval by the author. In the end, this book is an extremely funny fun-read. Although he does jest and joke, he makes no profound statements or analysis of anything. He makes no strong points, and doesn't seem to have any purpose beyond just writing a really funny play. This is not the sort of thing that you read and then muse over for an hour feeling really good about yourself and thinking "Wow, I am much smarter then when I first opened the cover" ( I'd head over to War and Peace or any Dostoevsky/Tolstoy novel if that is what your looking for). And yet there is a time and a season for the short, complicated, and extremely hilarious "love story" that Oscar Wilde has provided for us. My only advice is to read this in a private place. Apparently (based on the queer face expressions of local librarians and other patrons ) reading a book while stifling laughter and occasionally breaking out into giggles is not acceptable, at least not in my hometown library.
  • (4/5)
    Aha! So THIS is what Wodehouse was trying to do. Algernon > Jeeves
  • (5/5)
    Probably Oscar Wilde's most famous play, and certainly one of his best works. The story revolves around a couple of society gentlemen who have fallen in love with women who have the idea that they should marry a man by the name of Ernest. Since neither of the young men are named Ernest, this leads to a lot of pretense, and suddenly the world is blessed with two Ernest Worthingtons. The resolution might seem somewhat contrived, but since the entire play is a satire, this can be forgiven, since it is intended to appear that way. A fun work, and a quick read.
  • (4/5)
    started this book without any knowledge nor expectatations. a great surprise how funny this piece is. a comedy of changed identities and not so proper british society. a true gem.
  • (5/5)
    I just love Oscar Wilde. He is fresh, he is ironic and he describes the english society of his time in a remarkable way. The importance of Being Earnest is a short play very easy to read that brings to the reader a great story that it can enjoy over and over again discovering the magic of his words at the time that we are transported in time...
  • (5/5)
    “I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.” A play should of course for maximum benefit be expereinced in the theatre. The next best thing would be to buy an audiobook - the L.A. Theatre Works performing The Importance of Being Earnest with live audience. It’s such a delight - have there been written a more funnier play? With Oscar Wilde’s famous quips and witty remarks - this story of mistaken identities in upper class british society display an exuberance of life and high spirits. “Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can’t get into it do that.” I think everyone in this production is in top form - and specially Lady Bracknell played by Margaret Scudamore. “I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.”
  • (4/5)
    Witty and so clever. I do love when societal norms are questioned. I watched the movie shortly after with Micheal Redgrave and thought it was excellent as well. The best part was the ending with Ms. Prism; she was just as I imagined her in my mind.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first experience of an Oscar Wilde play and it definitely exceeded my expectations. This was well-written, witty and intelligent, with charming characters and a great plot. I will definitely be picking up more Wilde in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Another book for my RL book club, and one I was hugely excited about, the book being a Wilde after all. While I won't go as far as to say Plays aren't my thing, they are definitely not my staple reading either. There have been a number of plays I have read and enjoyed, but I always have suspected in it being my luck more than anything else, in picking those plays - not to mention, the not-so-decent plays are thankfully, easily forgotten. The witticism, the cynicism, the antipathy, were all there as they could be expected to be and the play more or less delivered to my ridiculously high expectations. And the quotes, oh the quotes! "The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what Fiction means."“My dear fellow, the truth isn’t quite the sort of thing one tells to a nice, sweet, refined girl. What extraordinary ideas you have about the way to behave to a woman!” “Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can’t get into it do that.” ...and there were many more...5/5
  • (5/5)
    One of the awesome book I have ever read! Though the story was simple but the way it was presented by Oscar wilde was brilliant! It’s very difficult to put down this book once you start. Definitely a treat for those who love humor genre! Enjoyed every bit of it!
  • (4/5)
    I bought this on a whim, I recognised the name and decided "Why not".I loved it, it was sharp, funny and oh so relevant.
  • (5/5)
    I had to read this for my AP Lit class. It was the first book for the class, and I was a bit skeptical of it at first. As it turns out, it was hilarious! I could rarely find a page where I was not laughing. Nothing better than a good Victorian satire! ;)
  • (5/5)
    Ah where to begin? A lifetime of quotes. Oh to be Lady Bracknell in my dotage. "To lose one parents, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness. " or "Hesitation of any kind is a sign of mental decay in the young, of physical weakness in the old." and finally "Three addresses always inspire confidence, even in tradesmen."
  • (5/5)
    Every time I read this play, I find myself amazed at how funny it is! This Librivox recording (version 3) was excellent, which didn't surprize me since Elizabeth Klett was not only the voice of Gwendolyn but also the coordinator. Ruth Golding was especially good as Lady Bracknell, but all the narrators were wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    I actually read an online version of this text provided by my teacher as part of my Introduction to Drama course, so this is not the same version I'm writing about, but is the same work. This is a more modern version of the Comedy of Manners, though from a very conservative time in history that didn't allow for much sexual content. That said, there are some interesting mistaken identities, "faked" deaths, couples falling in love at the drop of a hat, and great criticism and humor towards Victorian society and habits. It's modern enough to be read easily, with an interesting story, and is doubtlessly amusing. I'd certainly recommend that anyone interested in drama read it once at least.
  • (5/5)
    I have long enjoyed the wittiness that I found peeking around the corner of each page of this marvelous book. At many times, I found myself laughing quite hard at things that seemed both innocent and obvious at the same time. A must read for any hardcore literature fan.
  • (4/5)
    Wilde’s last completed play, written in 1895, before his world tragically came crashing down. As always, he’s irreverent and witty in satirizing the institutions of society, most notably love and marriage in this play. Two bachelors use deception and the alter ego “Earnest” in the attempt to woo a couple of ladies who are under the watchful eye of a protector, Lady Bracknell. Irony pervades the play; to be earnest of course is to be sincere, which the men are anything but. Wilde’s mission was to make light of everything society holds dear, to point out that ‘serious matters’ are in reality trivial, and it’s silly to pretend otherwise. In this he was successful, and I find that his humor really stands the test of time.Just a couple of quotes, on marriage:“I really don’t see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If I ever get married, I’ll certainly try to forget the fact.”“To speak frankly, I am not in favour of long engagements. They give people the opportunity of finding out each other’s character before marriage, which I think is never advisable.”
  • (4/5)
    The 2 narrators on this version were incredible, immediately switching voices without missing a beat. I don't know how they did it. The book was amusing in a stuffy English way. Silly can be fun.