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Rolling In The Deep

Rolling In The Deep

Scritto da Mira Grant

Narrato da Teri Schnaubelt


Rolling In The Deep

Scritto da Mira Grant

Narrato da Teri Schnaubelt

valutazioni:
4/5 (198 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
3 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 21, 2019
ISBN:
9781541447387
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

When the Imagine Network commissioned a documentary on mermaids, to be filmed from the cruise ship Atargatis, they expected what they had always received before: an assortment of eyewitness reports that proved nothing, some footage that proved even less, and the kind of ratings that only came from peddling imaginary creatures to the masses.

They didn't expect actual mermaids. They certainly didn't expect those mermaids to have teeth.

This is the story of the Atargatis, lost at sea with all hands. Some have called it a hoax; others have called it a maritime tragedy. Whatever the truth may be, it will only be found below the bathypelagic zone in the Mariana Trench . . . and the depths are very good at keeping secrets.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 21, 2019
ISBN:
9781541447387
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Mira Grant is the author of the New York Times best-selling Newsflesh trilogy, along with multiple other works of biomedical science fiction. She has been nominated for the Hugo Award, and her book, Feed, was chosen as one of NPR's 100 Killer Thrillers.

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198 valutazioni / 17 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Good short read. I really enjoy Grant's writing. Her stories take a very original twist on things like mermaids and leaves you gripped to the very end.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing creature feature horror story. I read the sequel already but listening to this makes me want to pick it up and read it again.
  • (3/5)
    The narrator was superb. I found the story enjoyable but because I’ve already read Drowning in the deep I knew what was happening so there was no horror or mystery. Still a fun listen though
  • (4/5)
    Prequel to Into the drowning deeps - if you enjoyed this book, definitely go read the 2nd book!
  • (5/5)
    It's amazing. I loved it!! For fans of mermaids... Scary mermaids.
  • (4/5)
    Quick, fun story that made fun quarantine listening. Suspend disbelief and enjoy.
  • (3/5)
    I’ve decided that, like Jim C. Hines, I’m a fan of the person but not the books.This is genuine horror, something I rarely see nowadays, but it’s exactly what you expect. A camera crew goes out into the middle of the ocean to make a fakeumentary about mermaids, but wind up being attacked by some real ones. Sounds like every SyFy monster movie.It takes a long time to get to the point where the action happens, and you don’t really care what happens to the characters. Not because they’re assholes but because a) it’s a novella so there’s not much point to get invested and b) you know everyone’s going to be getting killed. All the characters are kind of the same. They go through no arcs, and there are too many to keep track of. I would have liked more attention on characters like the deaf first mate instead of the blah mockumentary host and the hard-nosed stereotype captain.One thing I will say is that the ending is very good. It’s hard to do modern cinematic style horror (i.e., swarms of monsters like The Descent or 28 Days Later) and keep it coherent, but that’s why Mira Grant is one of the best in the business. Even if I didn’t like the story, I liked the writing. Again, it could be that I’m dead inside.The problem is it takes too long to get to that ending. There’s no real build-up or slow burn beforehand. There’s simply nothing but mundane things happening. The characters don’t form relationships with each other, there’s no plot consequences or cause-and-effects.All in all, it has markings of one of those “straight-to-video” horror movies. But blessed be the short form, because that’s always perfect for horror.
  • (4/5)
    When a story lets you know how it ends on the very first page it does take the sting out of a bit. The story does take the idea of a fake documentary on mermaids and says surprise they are real and not what you were hoping for. The idea that the filming crew has hired fake mermaids is brilliant and has everyone under contract with so many restrictions on what they can do on the boat and who they can talk to is amusing. Of course knowing that this is a doomed voyage does make almost any humor have a cutting edge to it as the reader knows more than the crew. I enjoyed the story and was sad that it was over too quickly but I so want to see more of these mermaids even if it means more people have to die in the story
  • (5/5)
    Fascinating! This book had me on the edge of my seat! Incredible storytelling! Very exciting. A lot happened in a short time but I felt like I missed nothing. Wonderful book!
  • (5/5)
    A great read. Quick, engaging. The author basically tends you how it ends up front, but getting there was deliciously fun.
  • (4/5)
    I finished this slim volume in an afternoon. I enjoyed the character developement and the science. A ship of marine scientists and a television crew (among others) travels to the Mariana Trench. one of the deepest parts of the ocean, to investigate whether mermaids actually exist. The book quickly evoles into a horror story.
  • (4/5)
    This novella that preceded Into the Drowning Deep was a very quick read. I liked it well enough, although at that length it is just a creepy little story, without the depth of character and the science that I liked so much in Into the Drowning Deep. Still...killer mermaids!
  • (4/5)
    A sf/f-reality TV channel is filming a docu-drama about a search for mermaids in the deepest part of the ocean. The scientists are there because they can do other research; the crew is there because they're getting paid; and the professional mermaids are there to swim in the ocean far from land. Everything is going well until the ship discovers something strange underwater and that something strange discovers them.

    This short was typical Mira Grant in that it was epistolary in framing, based on the development of actual species, and is therefore possible enough to be terrifying.
  • (4/5)
    This was fun! But then, I'm a sucker for people that try to give their horror a plausible veneer of biological reality, and after how much I enjoyed Newsflesh I'm more than eager to read more. I'm a bit skeptical on how to make a series out of this premise, but I await to see how it unfolds once Into the Drowning Deep is released.
  • (4/5)
    So this was a quick read, in preparation for reading 'Into the Drowning Deep' for my Horror Postal Book Club. It's a quick novella, and gives you a little 'bloody' taste of what's to come in 'Drowning Deep', and gives background to the novel. Killer mermaids finally have their own book, and I'm looking forward to the real deal!
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    When I saw that this book by Mira Grant was being released by Subterranean Press I was immediately dying to have it. I am a huge fan of Mira Grant (aka Seanan McGuire). This ended up being an intriguing and well written fantasy/thriller/horror of sorts. It is a pretty short novella and would have made a wonderful full-length book. The cruise ship Atargatis has been hired by Imagine Network to go on a journey like none other. The Atargatis is supposed to journey over the Marianas Trench in a quest to prove that mermaids are real. The boat is full of the world’s leading researchers on marine life; experts who...while not necessarily looking for mermaids…are excited to have someone else foot the bill for their scientific equipment and give them a chance to learn more about deep sea life. Imagine Network (never one to leave anything to chance) also brings along their own troupe of mermaids, normal women who really want to be real life mermaids and are darn good at it. What they find is more disturbing and alarming than anything they imagined.This book is set up in a very journalistic type way...much like Grant’s Newsflesh series. Each section starts with an excerpt from a book about ghost ships, so right away you know things went horribly wrong with the Atargatis. The story is very much a slow build with disaster striking quickly and decisively right at the end of the book.I was a bit worried about how many characters are introduced right off the bat, but I shouldn’t have worried. There are a lot of characters, but they were easy to keep track off. The book also switches POV between different characters quite a bit, but this worked well and gave the story a broader focus without being too scattered.I also enjoyed some of the science talk around marine biology and a look into the lives of women who want to assume the lifestyle of mermaids. Parts of the book do get pretty gory and disturbing at the end, so you’ve been warned.My only complaint about this book is that it is so short. There were so many interesting areas in this story that could have been explored at greater depth (no pun intended). I wanted to know more about everything in this book and was disappointed at how quickly everything was presented and wrapped up.Overall this is an engaging and entertaining thriller/fantasy of sorts. The story is fast-paced and interesting. I wish it had been a bit longer and more fleshed out.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Horror novella with Grant’s trademark interest in public perception/communication. A “reality” show similar to Discovery’s pseudo-scientific “documentaries” sets out to find out if mermaids really do live in the deepest part of the ocean. Spoiler: they do. And they’re hungry.