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The Institute: A Novel

The Institute: A Novel

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Santino Fontana


The Institute: A Novel

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Santino Fontana

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (3.151 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
18 ore
Pubblicato:
10 set 2019
ISBN:
9781508279075
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Disponibile anche come e-bookE-book

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Descrizione

From number one New York Times best-selling author Stephen King comes the most riveting and unforgettable story of kids confronting evil since It — publishing just as the second part of It, the movie, lands in theaters.

In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’ parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents — telekinesis and telepathy — who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and 10-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”

In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from The Institute.

As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.

Pubblicato:
10 set 2019
ISBN:
9781508279075
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come e-bookE-book

Informazioni sull'autore

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di The Institute

4.4
3151 valutazioni / 196 Recensioni
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Recensioni della critica

  • Can't get enough of the master of horror? We dare you to check out his new supernatural thriller. A shadowy, Deep State organization abducts kids with special powers. Imprisoned in a creepy facility, the teens are tortured to exploit and enhance their psychic abilities. No one has ever escaped, but 12-year-old prodigy Luke is determined to get out — or die trying.

    Scribd Editors

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Stephen King never disappoints. His storytelling abilities are out of this world.
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable! It has the kids get together to fight evil theme, and fun psychic abilities. Audio narration is fantastic. Keeps you hooked!
  • (5/5)
    Loved the suspense, the characters, the whole she-bang!!! I want a sequel!
  • (5/5)
    Great thriller adventure that had me hooked from the start!
  • (5/5)
    This was great but not typical Stephen king. Kept me hooked though
  • (5/5)
    I truly feel that King's wheelhouse is in psychic children stories and adventures. This feels a bit like a spiritual sequel to Firestarter to me. It was fantastic.
  • (5/5)
    Very good read! Once it got up to a certain point real page turner! I'd ignore the reviews about politics, I think those ppl got real caught up on the few negative comments about Trump (real sensitive i guess) there was hardly that much political commentary in this book to write a bad review. King loves his TK and TP individuals and big brother conspiracies and this was him at his best! Such sadistic characters though!
  • (4/5)
    The book starts very slowly, it takes a fair while to get to the action. It is of the common genre of odd gifted kids being at a special institution. Just this time the explanation was weak-ish for me.
  • (3/5)
    Stephen King comes up with interesting premises, but tends to fall flat when depicting children. He has this weird tendency to write about children sexually, even though it usually hurts the story overall than help it. Often enough, you hear his voice instead of the voices of the characters. I feel in many ways, it is all about plot and less about substance.
    The first 3/4 are quite strong plot wise. You’re taken on a journey and want to know more and more, but by the climax I was bored.
    Enjoyed the premise. Read this with a critical eye.
  • (5/5)
    Gripping storyline to make my time on the treadmill go faster. Also an excellent reader.
  • (3/5)
    A child's triumph after almost being broken by the world will always be a heart-grabbing story. Elements of the story were not original, but this is overlooked by Stephen's signature natural convo between his characters.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely riveting couldn’t put it down. Like every Stephen King book manages to squeeze the N-word in somewhere someone lol
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my absolute favorite books of all times. I've listened to it over and over and over again.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing. My first audio novel. Can't wait to start another! The master sounds as good as he reads. Thanks
  • (5/5)
    Interesting book. Exciting. King is a great author. No ghost or demons in this novel thumbs up for me.
  • (5/5)
    Very good book it kept me wanting more so I’m going to try another Stephen King book.
  • (5/5)
    This was a very imaginative awesome read! Bravo Stephen King!
  • (4/5)
    My first Stephen King book for years (I've read a lot of his classics). I really enjoyed this story and couldn't wait to get to the end. I loved the kids he created here and was rooting for them.
  • (5/5)
    Stephen King is a master storyteller. I finished the book in 2 days.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! Was my first Stephen King novel I've read or I should say listened to and I just wanted to keep listening and listening to see how it ended. Took me a while to finish it but was amazing and loved the ending. I can't wait for there to be a series to be released in honor of this novel and hope maybe they longate the story at the end to show perhaps how their lives turned out and a reunite. Such a good book definetly a tear jerker as some points but didn't mind that.
  • (4/5)
    I am not much into the science fiction but it kept me interested and I listened to the whole book.
  • (2/5)
    why cant I listen past chapter 33. I am interested
  • (3/5)
    The plot is classic Stephen King, but the story-telling isn't as rich and nuanced as I've come to expect from the master.
  • (4/5)
    When I first started this book, I was dubious. The story according to the book flap was about children trapped in an institute; the first several chapters were about a middle-aged man in Nowhere, U.S.A. However, once all the pieces got moving, my fears subsided and I was riveted (as I often am with Stephen King).

    My rating for this book is somewhere between 3.8 and 3.9. I understand the appeal of juggling multiple concurrent timelines but I think it would have been better to tell the story of the children, then go back and tell the brief story of how Tim ended up in DuPray, and then bring it together for the last bit of action/follow-up.

    I feel like this novel lays the groundwork to carry on in other facets in future stories and I hope it does! Having just seen Dr. Sleep, part of me wonders what would have been made of someone like Abra Stone or Danny Torrance (or, let's go back even further, Carrie White). I know some of King's novels are connected in and to his multiverse (I caught the nod to Jerusalem's Lot). But in cases like this, where I feel that the story line would fit so well with others, I often find myself disappointed that they are in separate strings of the King multiverse.
  • (4/5)
    I don't really need to say anything about this book, because these reviews are mainly for myself. I don't need to convince myself that I am a complete fangirl when it comes to Stephen King. So I'll just say that this was a nice combo of supernatural and evil, and I was very thrilled about the 'instutute' as a context, not knowing what kind of institute it was going to be. All in all, probably not the best of his works, but very entertaining nonetheless.
  • (5/5)
    Stephen King is a master story teller and his latest book is further proof of his skills. It tells the story of a young boy, Luke Ellis, who is kidnapped from his home as his parents are murdered. He is taken to a secretive location in Maine (where else?) called "The Institute". There he is confined with other children all of whom have supernatural powers either telekinesis or telepathy. The central character, Luke, and his new friends have one's sympathy from the outset; the adult who eventually comes to their rescue is a classic American loner hero; and the villains are truly cruel. This is not a work of great literature, but it's a fun way to spend one's time during a pandemic -- something which King has written about elsewhere.
  • (5/5)
    I have not written a review here in a while, but for this book I figured I would make an exception. This is hands down the best book I have read this year. When I first started reading, I was thinking to myself this is a Stephen King book, right? Where's the horror/scariness? But once I really got into it, I realized that I didn't need that. The book was certainly suspenseful and kept me up many nights because I wanted to know what was going to happen. This book can definitely be a movie that I will go see on opening night. Not to mention the fact that some of the storyline takes place in my home state of South Carolina. I highly recommend this book and am waiting for someone to tell me what the significance of the date is at the end.
  • (4/5)
    Luke Ellis, is a very intelligent 12-year-old whose parents are debating whether or not to send him to college. These plans are disrupted when he is kidnapped from his bed and his parents are killed. He is transported by night to a remote facility when he is meets a number of children similarly abducted who possess varying degrees of psycho-telepathy and psycho-telekinesis. Each one's powers will be tested and enhanced until at some point will be transferred to another section of the facility for some unknown purpose. Luke hopes to find a means of escape to inform the world of this clandestine project and rescue his friends.This novel contains two plot elements common to several King's novels: people with paranormal abilities and children who ban together to fight evil. If you are a Stephen King fan you will want to include this novel in your "to-be-read" bookshelves.
  • (5/5)
    The Institute by Stephen KingLuke Is kidnapped from his Minnesota home and his parents murdered. He wakes up in room exactly like his bedroom, minus any windows. He finds he is in "The Institute" along other kids like himself (with special abilities). He befriends Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris and Avery (who is only ten years old).Mrs. Sigsby, the Director is no non-sense, strict and often cruel along with her staff. They will reward those who are obedient and punish those who are not. Soon the children find that they are "experiments" and none of them want to end up in the back half of The Institute (where kids seem to never return). For these children with extraordinary abilities life is hell, unless they can pull off the ultimate, escape.A compelling original story with well developed characters. I really liked Luke and his friends especially young Avery. Luke is strong willed and wants to get them all out. The story is chilling as I felt something like this could really happen. With graphic details and engaging dialog I was engross and hooked from the beginning until the end. I am a huge Stephen King fan and really enjoyed The Institute, and feel others will as well. I highly recommend.
  • (5/5)
    As a long-time fan of Stephen King’s works I suffered a few disappointments in the past handful of years, at times wondering if he had lost some of the… special powers that made his books so compelling in the past. Something of the old vigor seemed to have returned with the previously published book, The Outsider, although that too fell a little short of the mark, at least for me, but reading his latest creation, The Institute, I realized I was witnessing the long awaited… Return of the King :-) The main reason, from my point of view, is that once again Stephen King chose not to delve into supernatural horror, although he does that quite well, but to explore the kind that comes from the darkest corners of the human soul: what we, as humans, are capable of once compassion and empathy are removed, is indeed much more terrifying than any fictional vampire or clown-shaped evil entity.The Institute starts with one of those themes King does so well, a small town background in which former cop Tim Jamieson lands after leaving his old job and starting an aimless peregrination through the country: the city of DuPray is one of those creations we often encountered – with different names – in many of Stephen King’s stories, a small community where everyone knows everyone else and the interpersonal dynamics are built on equally well-known figures like an older, world-wise sheriff; a shifty motel manager; a possibly crazy old lady who hides unexpected depths; and so on. Despite this stagnant, somnolent tableau, one can feel the mounting dread, almost like the sound of approaching thunder, and it would be easy to imagine that whatever is going to happen, will happen here, shattering DuPray’s day-by-day sameness.Instead we are surprised by an abrupt change of perspective (at least for a good portion of the book) as the focus moves toward twelve-year old Luke Ellis, a boy gifted with extraordinary intelligence and such a balanced disposition that he’s not isolated as many geniuses are, but rather knows how to successfully integrate his cleverness with any kind of social situation. But Luke is special in another way: he possesses some telekinetic powers – not much, just enough to move a pizza pan or to ruffle a book’s pages, but evidently enough to catch the attention of a shady governmental agency. One night a team infiltrates Luke’s house, kills both his parents and kidnaps him. When Luke wakes up from his drugged sleep he finds himself in a room that mirrors his own, apart from the missing window and the fact that the door opens on a corridor with many other similar doors and a few motivational posters depicting happy children at play.The Institute, located in a remote area of Maine, has been in operation since the mid-fifties, acquiring gifted children in the same, merciless way as Luke was: the prisoners’ talents in telepathy or telekinesis are enhanced through injections with often unpredictable after-effects or sheer torture – like the near-drowning in the dreaded tank – and the new arrivals placed in the first section of the compound, called Front Half, are then moved to the Back Half, from which they never return. Children are told they are serving their country and that once their stint at the Institute is over they will be returned to their families after a mind-wipe that will erase all memories of their experience – and if we readers know what bare-faced lie this is, many of the kids have already learned not to trust these adults who treat them so callously and to doubt anything they are told, despite their desperate need to believe it.This novel offers a story in which tension builds with each new chapter, leading with page-turning intensity toward a massive showdown, and as such it’s a very satisfying read that to me brought back the excitement I used to find in older King works, but where it truly excels is in the exploration of the human soul in both its brightest and darkest sides. The former comes from the children, who are forced to grow up very quickly in the face of the situation they find themselves in, creating bonds with each other that go beyond any consideration of gender, race or temperament: they are all victims here, aware that a ruthless machine they have no control over is using them, chewing them up and then discarding whatever remains. Deprived of their freedom and their dignity (at some point one of their captors uses the word property) they try to cling to whatever form of defiance is allowed them, while dealing with the incredible, often terrifying powers that have been wakened in them. I admired the way Stephen King never resorts to easy sentimentalism when portraying these kids, even when they are faced with heart-wrenching circumstances or unbearable losses, which lends an incredibly powerful intensity to a key moment when one of those children chooses sacrifice for the good of others, the last thought in that young mind being “I loved having friends”. I am not ashamed to say that the sentence made me cry, such was my connection with these wonderful characters.On the other side of the equation, the adults managing the Institute are a case in point for what happens to one’s conscience when the perception of a supposedly worthy goal makes them stop caring for collateral damage: the abducted children are seen as a means to an end – preventing the annihilation of the human race – and as such they must be driven to serve, whether they want it or not. If the people in the top echelon of the Institute are imbued with such blind zealotry and deal with the children with dispassionate practicality, the lower ranks are another matter: many of them actually enjoy hurting their young charges when they don’t obey orders or refuse to submit to painful and dangerous procedures. Even though it’s never expressed openly, the parallel with concentration camps guards is there for everyone to see, the dehumanizing of the victims and the unwillingness to see them as people – there is a painfully lucid reflection from Luke Ellis that paints this divide in no uncertain terms:Luke realized he wasn’t a child at all to her. She had made some crucial separation in her mind. He was a test subject. You made it do what you wanted, and if it didn’t, you administered what the psychologists called negative reinforcement. And when the tests were over? You went down to the break room for coffee and danish and talked about your own kids (who were real kids) or bitched about politics, sports, whatever.Once again, King paints children as both victims and heroes, and this time they don’t battle with supernatural evil but with an earthly kind of wickedness that’s even more terrifying because it’s a part of the human mindset, one that might lie dormant but can be all too easily reawakened given the right input. The Institute is at times a hard book to read, but it’s one that compels you to think, and to think hard about what makes us human and what can rob us of that oh-so-thin veneer of compassion toward our own kind. And it’s also a story that made me delight in the return of the narrative strength I so enjoyed in the past from this author.