Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Into the Black

Into the Black

Scritto da Evan Currie

Narrato da David de Vries


Into the Black

Scritto da Evan Currie

Narrato da David de Vries

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (72 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
15 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 2, 2019
ISBN:
9781978669529
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

This edition of Odyssey One has been completely edited and remastered to correct the typos and content issues that reviewers commented on in the original edition.

Beyond the confines of our small world, far from the glow of our star, lies a galaxy and universe much larger and more varied than anyone on Earth can possibly imagine. For the new NAC spacecraft Odyssey and her crew, the unimaginable facets of this untouched world are about to become reality.

The Odyssey's maiden voyage is an epic adventure destined to make history. Captain Eric Weston and his crew, pushing past the boundaries of security, encounter horrors, wonders, monsters, and people, all of which will test their resolve, challenge their abilities, and put in sharp relief what is necessary to be a hero.

A first-rate military science fiction epic that combines old-school space opera and modern storytelling, Into the Black: Odyssey One is a riveting, exhilarating adventure with vivid details, rich mythology, and relentless pacing that will leave you breathlessly awaiting book two.

Pubblicato:
Apr 2, 2019
ISBN:
9781978669529
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a Into the Black

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Into the Black

4.4
72 valutazioni / 12 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    Forgettable.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed Evan Currie's Into the Black: Odyssey One a great deal and appreciated his treatment of various science fiction staples such as faster than light (FTL) travel and first contact. Into the Black tells the story of Earth's first interstellar voyage launched by a world that is still divided between East and West after World War III. The adventure is fast paced and Currie's character development is top notch. I especially liked how Currie uses only slight twists that make the technology of Odyssey One possible under the laws of physics as we understand them today. He also imposes seemingly "real world" limitations such as charging time and various other factors that make you feel like this technology is possible in our universe, giving the reader a real feeling of connectedness with the "anti-reality" that is being presented. One of my favorite technical aspects that Currie pays close attention to is the limitations of dealing in distances that can be measured in light-seconds or light-minutes, and the direct comparison he uses to submarine warfare in this novel. Most visual science fiction works make battle in space seem immediate with laser hits happening as soon as they are sent and visual feedback of damage inflicted on a foe immediately registered. Currie chooses to be true to time and distance and makes the battle scenes much more palpable in the waiting for the time it takes for sensors signals traveling at light speed to reach their target and return to their sender before knowing what information will be discovered. Into the Black takes on epic themes of chivalry, military history and tradition, and duty to humanity, even when the humans in question belong to another planetary system. There is also great irony being dealt with as Captain Weston throws his ship and crew in harms way to defend a planet that knows only peace among it's species, while back on Earth there is division among humankind and bitter tensions from a very recent war. I enjoyed thouroughly enjoyed this novel and look forward to reading The Heart of Matter, the second book in the Odyssey One saga.
  • (4/5)
    I like the closing of the Amazon description - "A first-rate military science fiction epic that combines old-school space opera and modern storytelling...". It is a really good space opera (good guys are good guys, bad guys - alien bugs - are bad)and it is well told. I especially appreciate the naval references - the spacecraft looks like an old sailing vessel but functions very similar to an aircraft carrier. That was a unique an well done blending, and the method of interstellar travel was very entertaining. I have already bought and look forward to the next in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting and pretty well done military SF, with the first starship into space from Earth immediately running into an interstellar war.Barring the idea that the first shot out of the gate we'd run into such a thing, it was a well done space battle book, with some interesting hints of what is to come, and what sort of universe the crew of the Odyssey and Earth is going to be dealing with.Pretty good characterization for this particular sub-genre as well.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book. Frankly, its corny, nothing is in the least bit original and if you are not an ardent fan of Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica or Starship Troopers, then you will not enjoy it, but who cares? It just works. Moves at a cracking pace, has genuine tension in parts, and although the characters are walking cliches, they are solid enough to generate empathy from the reader. Best of all, it harks back to the glorious beginnings of sf in the pulp magazines of the 30's and 40's. Pure, unadulterated space opera, you got to love it.
  • (4/5)
    Into the Black Odyssey One by Evan Currie. This is a classic military science fiction story. It is heavy on the military and light on the science. It faithfully follows all of the cliché of the genre. It is the story of Earth’s first space ship capable of instantaneous interstellar travel. Like other recently published military science fiction series such as Ian Banks Star Carrier series and Mark Kloos’s Frontline's series, Earth is politically divided and has just survived a recent non nuclear war. Unlike the two previously mentioned series this aspect of the story is given short shrift . It is used as a reason to arm the ship, theoretically tasked for exploration and research, with every conceivable weapons system and special operations operator and super pilot in the North American Alliance. In retrospect this turns out to be a fortunate design feature. As soon as the Odyssey leaves the solar system it and her crew find itself caught in the middle of an interstellar war. The rest of the book focuses on one battle after another. The good aliens look human and are inexperienced in the ways of war. The bad aliens look like insects and have unbeatable weapons and tactics. A riff off of Star Ship Troopers. It is no surprise given the genre that the bad aliens can’t beat the Odyssey. If Captain Kirk and the Enterprise had been as well armed it would not had gotten its butt kicked regularly by the Klingons. The elements that make military science a fun read are the descriptions of the battles, the description of the weapon systems and how the writer is able to raise the immediate stakes for characters and long term stakes for the solar systems or alliances involved. On this score Currie gets a passing grade. The battles are well written, the weapon systems are believable, and although the outcome was never in doubt Currie was able to keep tension high. This book is the first book in a four part series. I will read them as they become available in my library. I don’t think they will be good enough to buy/
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this and feel it is similar to the Frontiers Saga by Ryk Brown, but I didn't enjoy this as much. I did like that this was self-contained, especially as I am not sure about continuing the series. Maybe it is because it was self-contained and didn't include the major hook to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    The story and theme of the book were wonderful. The only thing I personally didn't like is that it felt a little rushed through the story. Although, that could have just been the narrator and how he read.
  • (4/5)
    A fun book to read. The end of the book has a great ending.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Very good read. Hard to put down. Major logic flaw, aliens have weapon that immobilizes all the earth crew members. They are only saved by a suicide mission. The aliens never use the weapon again?????!!!!!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (1/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Totally implausible plot, the first interstellar voyage staffed entirely by the military for no reason. No known threat to Earth. They visit a new star system, no one cares a bit. They discover a human, not a humanoid, a real human. Again no one cares. Fight some bug creatures that have an invincible weapon they only bother to use once and then forget about. Humans triumphant with only one casualty. Worse than Battlefield Earth, that's quite an accomplishment.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (2/5)
    A real action fest with some nice ideas on technologies and the problems of waging war in space. I would never call it a space opera. The people on the Odyssey are all perfect soldiers: idealistic, courageous, professional, (almost) infallible. Their motivation is very thin and their characters would be the typical soldier/cannon fodder used in many movies, if not for the fact that it is not possible to kill them (unless they want to sacrifice themselves). It is also hard to accept that the Odyssey was in any danger, despite the situation it was in. A laser creates a huge hole in the hull and the only problem is to seal it - no real problems with critical systems, navigation, etc.

    With respect to the spelling/grammar errors, I know this is an indie publication and I don't expect perfection. Nevertheless, it looks like the author never read his manuscript twice. Besides the constant use of "then" instead of "than" and other errors, there are also several cases where one paragraph repeats the previous or contradicts the next. The author also apparently forgot about one of the most devastating weapons of the Drasin, a weapon that incapacitated the crew of the Odyssey during their first encounter. There were also at least two cases where in the middle of the action the author goes on on a tangent to give the history of a rifle or a weapon (something that he doesn't bother to do for most of his main cast) ruining the pacing of the story. This book needs some editing, even some unprofessional one from a friend would improve it considerably.

    All in all, if you love Starship Troopers then you will love this, otherwise it is hard to recommend. My rating: It was ok (two stars)