Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Homeworld: Odyssey One

Homeworld: Odyssey One


Homeworld: Odyssey One

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (52 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
12 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 30, 2019
ISBN:
9781978669581
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The consequences of Earth's exploration of the Galaxy come home to roost when the Drasin track a human ship back to Earth. Mounting a desperate defense, the crew of the NAC spacecraft Odyssey, their allies, and the people of Earth face an overwhelming force of invading alien ships wielding terrible power. Doomed from the start, but with nowhere to retreat, Captain Eric Weston commits his ship to the defense of the human race even as the human outposts in Sol system fall one by one before the unrelenting Drasin onslaught.

A first-rate military science fiction epic that combines old-school space opera and modern storytelling, Homeworld: Odyssey One, the third installment of the Odyssey One series, brings the riveting, exhilarating, hard-pressed action to Earth, with devastating consequences.

Pubblicato:
Apr 30, 2019
ISBN:
9781978669581
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a Homeworld

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Homeworld

4.6
52 valutazioni / 4 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    Homeworld Odyssey One (Book 3) by Evan Currie. This book takes place shortly after the events chronicled in The Heart of the Matter Odyssey One (Book 2). That book ended with the main character intending to have a conversation with the entity known as Central, the planetary mind on Ranquil. That conversation either does not happen or is never gets mentioned in Homeworld. Central has very little to say in Homeworld. What does happen in Homeworld is the telling of the story of how The Drasin and their masters follow a Chinese starship back to Earth and how the defenders of Earth make their stand. Readers who love intense detailed descriptions of desperately fought space battles will be extremely satisfied. The book does deliver some character development in that the reader gets insight into the mind and motivations of the Drasin, and their tenuous relationship with their unnamed masters The Priminae who have been presented as pacifist with in ability to fight effectively are presented in a better light this book when compared to the prior two books. Overall I was satisfied with this book when I view it in the light of other military science fiction books. The book is strong on excitement. Strong on space battles. But the story and the series as a whole is incredibly weak on character development and insight into the politics of the matter. This seems to be the weakness of military science fiction as a whole.
  • (1/5)
    I'm almost certain that the word "grimaced" is used more frequently than the principle character's name. I'm not even joking. When they're not grimacing everywhere, they're scowling, glowering and snorting. Every conversation with a snort is defused when the more powerful participant chuckles. It's like a nursery book of simple emotions, left on the pile of magazines at a doctor's office and with most of the pages missing.

    It's so full of this language, I'm tempted to download an epub if I can find one free, simply so I can run a few scripts against it. grep -c "(grimac(eeding)scow(lledling))", you know. Oh yes, and I find it disconcerting when two people are talking and one refers to the other as his erstwhile friend. Did I miss some falling-out? Does that word's meaning change over the next couple of hundred years? Who dares to dream?

    The story (for all that happens, it's mostly maneuvering) is OK. It's not good. I don't care about any of the characters, even the ones who had more development in earlier books. The first couple of chapters gave me hope that this time there was a more interesting plot and that the book had maybe seen better attention from an editor.

    It's not boring, exactly. If you skip over all the duplication, anyway. Because every time someone says something or some new information appears, another character will find a way to paraphrase it immediately, just so we're sure we understand.

    I remember how in the first book the crew of this futuristic spaceship were getting used to using a touch interface, since this is clearly an alternate universe where iPods never happened. It's the same universe however, where people take mind-controlled space fighters for granted. That kind of disconnect is still here.

    I've read the first one and listened to the next one on audiobook. I'm not sure why. I didn't finish this one and won't be getting any more sequels. I hope Currie keeps writing and other people get some enjoyment from it, because the world could do with more epic military SF and I don't want the genre to die out. But I mostly hope that we get some better authors.

    Oh, and it's got a prologue. I have no idea why. It's chaptered and the prologue is just chapter 1 of the B-storyline. Now that's just weird.
  • (5/5)
    I’m very glad I stumbled onto this series. It’s a very well written sci-go.
  • (5/5)
    I sure as hell didn't expect this ending...it was fantastic