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The Huntress: A Novel

The Huntress: A Novel

Scritto da Kate Quinn

Narrato da Saskia Maarleveld


The Huntress: A Novel

Scritto da Kate Quinn

Narrato da Saskia Maarleveld

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (67 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
19 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 26, 2019
ISBN:
9780062894823
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

From the author of the New York Times and USA Today best-selling novel The Alice Network comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted....

Bold and fearless, Nina Markova always dreamed of flying. When the Nazis attack the Soviet Union, she risks everything to join the legendary Night Witches, an all-female night bomber regiment wreaking havoc on the invading Germans. When she is stranded behind enemy lines, Nina becomes the prey of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the Huntress, and only Nina's bravery and cunning will keep her alive.

Transformed by the horrors he witnessed from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials, British war correspondent Ian Graham has become a Nazi hunter. Yet one target eludes him: a vicious predator known as the Huntress. To find her, the fierce, disciplined investigator joins forces with the only witness to escape the Huntress alive: the brazen, cocksure Nina. But a shared secret could derail their mission unless Ian and Nina force themselves to confront it.

Growing up in post-war Boston, 17-year-old Jordan McBride is determined to become a photographer. When her long-widowed father unexpectedly comes home with a new fiancée, Jordan is thrilled. But there is something disconcerting about the soft-spoken German widow. Certain that danger is lurking, Jordan begins to delve into her new stepmother’s past — only to discover that there are mysteries buried deep in her family...secrets that may threaten all Jordan holds dear.

In this immersive, heart-wrenching story, Kate Quinn illuminates the consequences of war on individual lives, and the price we pay to seek justice and truth.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 26, 2019
ISBN:
9780062894823
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Kate Quinn is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of historical fiction. A native of southern California, she attended Boston University where she earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Classical Voice. She has written four novels in the Empress of Rome Saga, and two books in the Italian Renaissance, before turning to the 20th century with The Alice Network and The Huntress. All have been translated into multiple languages. Kate and her husband now live in San Diego with two rescue dogs.

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4.4
67 valutazioni / 42 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I wasn't enthralled with The Alice Network; it was a good book, but it just didn't hit the right buttons for me. I didn't go into this book expecting to be absolutely transfixed by it, but luckily I was wrong. ;)Have you ever read a book that was really good and you WANTED to get to the end, but at the same time you didn't want to reach those final pages any time soon because that meant that you'd have to leave the characters behind? This book was that kind of book for me. It took me a week to finish the book, but for four of those days I was dragging my feet because I enjoyed the book so much that I didn't want to finish it. I loved so many of the characters, especially Nina, who was a Soviet "Night Witch" (night bomber) during the war. She was also unapologetically bisexual and fell madly in love with a fellow Night Witch, so YES YES AND YES. I was so happy to see this representation in the book, you have NO idea, especially since I read it during Pride month. The search for the Huntress and watching the characters come together was engaging, but what I really enjoyed the most about the book were the characters themselves. I could read a whole series of books about them hunting down Nazi war criminals and bringing them to justice (hint, hint, Kate Quinn! ;D). They were just so well done and felt like real people to me. Highly recommended for anyone who likes historical fiction.
  • (5/5)
    I selected this book for my work book club, and we discuss it in two days. While there were a few slow spots and some elements that I just didn't care about, I would still enthusiastically recommend this to all fans of historical fiction, even if you are suffering from WWII fiction fatigue.Kate Quinn's historical fiction novel features some amazingly strong women. While it's hard to think of Die Jagerin as anything but pure evil, one has to admit that she has an exceptional inner strength to do everything she did to survive after WWII ended. Jordan is a brilliant young woman, and the reader can't help but root for her. And Nina. Where does one begin with Nina? I absolutely loved her character. She was determined, mentally & physically tough, no-nonsense, and just a real survivor. I loved her.The writing here is compelling and moves along quickly, for the most part. It's a lengthy novel that doesn't feel over-long. I would have preferred less of Ian's POV chapters, but since, through him we got another side of Nina, I won't complain too much. Have I mentioned how awesome Nina is? This is a novel that touches on some big issues, ones that we still struggle with today - the concept of war crimes versus "following orders"; gender roles and inequality - and I can't say much more about the answers the book provides without giving away plot points, so I'll end this by saying this book is worth the hype I've seen. I usually avoid WWII historical novels, and I'm really glad I gave this one a chance.
  • (4/5)
    This a wonderful combination of mystery and historical fiction that brings the reader into the world of the men & women who search out Nazi war criminals and as well puts the spotlight on the amazing Soviet women who flew bombing missions against the German soldiers who had invaded their country. Nina is a Soviet flier who after making 615 bombing runs over German lines is forced to flee the Soviet forces because her father has been accused of slandering Stalin and although a war hero, she is also suspected of being unreliable and thus to be sent to the Gulag.While fleeing west towards allied lines, she witnesses an execution of a British airman by a German woman and after the war joins forces with a couple of Nazi hunters to find the woman. Meanwhile, Lorelei Vogt, the German woman has fled to the Boston MA. where she has married and settled into a wonderful life except for her step-daughter who originally is suspicious of her background.The lengthy section of the novel that covers Nina's time with the Night Witches is very accurate as I have read other books about these woman who flew slow biplanes up to 18 trips a night facing night fighters, search lights and anti aircraft guns to deliver their small bomb load.
  • (4/5)
    I liked a lot of this book but I expected to love it so I am a bit disappointed in it. Looking at online reviews after I read it but before I wrote this review it seems like most readers did love it. So maybe I'm just in a mood and at another time I would have loved it.There are three woman who are important to the plot: Anneliese aka Anna aka Lorelei, a German widow with a young daughter, who shows up in Boston in 1946; Jordan, a high school student living in Boston with her widowed father in 1946; Nina, a Russian aviator during the war who survived an encounter with The Huntress in Poland in 1944. Two men round out the important characters: Ian, an English journalist during the war who gave up journalism to hunt Nazis after the war; Tony, a former US soldier who grew up in New York among immigrant relatives giving him a facility with languages who is now helping Ian. Ian's younger brother was killed by The Huntress and so he badly wants to find her. Nina is the only living person who can identify The Huntress and so she joins Ian and Tony in Vienna where it is revealed that Ian married Nina after the war to fulfill a promise his brother made to her. Through flashbacks we learn how Nina became a flyer with the famous Night Witches, an all female group who flew combat missions for the USSR, and how she came to meet Ian's brother and then The Huntress. Jordan has suspicions about Anneliese even before she marries Jordan's father but Anneliese (who changes her name to Anna to become more American) has explanations for everything and Jordan is persuaded to like and trust her. In 1950 Ian, Nina and Tony arrive in Boston following clues that The Huntress (who they know as Lorelei Vogt) came there. Just as they arrive Jordan's father is killed in a terrible hunting accident and Jordan is devastated. Tony comes to apply for a job at the family antique store in order to follow up the clues about Lorelei. It takes some time but Jordan and Tony become romantically involved. Tony does not reveal the hunt for The Huntress to Jordan though; the book could have been much shorter if he had.Therein lies part of my issue with the book. It felt like it was lacking some judicious editing and some of the plot elements took too long to develop. I did love the sections about Nina's experiences during the war and thought how they were woven into the 1950 plot line worked quite well. Nina was certainly my favourite character in the book.
  • (4/5)
    Yes, better carve out a lit of hours to finish off this 530 page saga. Could have been shorter, the flying chapters could have been condensed and some other extraneous stuff eliminated. But on the whole, a good novel with BIG SCREEN potential. A cast of very strong smart women. Several good men. Mix it all together and what have you got? A wonderful book of complexity and revenge extraordinaire.
  • (3/5)
    a little too wordy
  • (4/5)
    Another enthralling novel by Kate Quinn! It’s set after WWII, but each character has flashbacks to pivotal times in their lives during the war. It’s an unlikely threesome that goes on the hunt for a woman who was a killer during the war. What sets her apart from other murderers during the war, was her apparent kindness to her victims prior to killing them.Nina, a former night bomber for Russia, teams up with Ian, who was a British war correspondent turned Nazi Hunter. Along with his partner Tony, the three set out on the trail of the woman they call “The Huntress.” I found the chapters about Nina both fascinating and nerve-wracking. The female pilots for Russia were a tough bunch of women, deserving of recognition. But Nina was so tough it was scary. With a rough childhood behind her, she was as scrappy as they come.The hunt takes the three to the United States, where Dan McBride owns an antique store and his daughter Jordan works alongside him. She has a love for photography and dreams of pursuing that as a career. When Dan meets a woman and decides to marry, their lives change in a profound way.The suspense builds as the Nazi hunters cross paths with the McBride family and by the last portion of the book, it was very intense as they close in on the Huntress.The author’s note at the end of the book is a must-read, as it tells readers about how the characters came into being and which ones were related to people who actually were involved in the war. Also, I especially loved the cameo appearance of Eve Gardner from Quinn’s novel The Alice Network.I won an advance copy of this book from Library Thing’s Early Readers Giveaway and am happy to give my honest review.
  • (3/5)
    This story was told from the points of view of three characters: Nina, her part mostly taking place during WWII, and Ian and Jordan, both of their threads taking place after the war. The movement between viewpoints was smooth and done in a way that felt necessary to the overall plot. I found Jordan's story the most suspenseful. A girl with a new step-mother who seems like the ideal step-parent. If only Jordan could shake that nagging suspicion. It reminded me a bit of Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt.In Ian's story I enjoyed his interactions with Nina. I was frequently amused by their differences and the way they reacted to them. They were great Nazi hunting partners too.As for Nina's story, this was the reason I wanted to read the book, to learn about the female night bombers. It was astounding to read about those brave women. Nina herself was an intriguing character. She was an interesting combination of toughness and vulnerability (I still would have understood how strong she was even if she'd sworn less, though). She was fiercely loyal and protective. I loved her version of helping a kid not be scared of a monster in the closet. Very unique, very Nina, and it cracked me up.I loved when the team was all working together, and I found the ending very satisfying.Thank you LibrayThing Early Reviewers for the ARC of this book.
  • (5/5)
    Kate Quinn, author of the best-seller THE ALICE NETWORK, has given us another extraordinary WWII story. She has masterfully woven a tapestry of interlinking characters whose backstories slowly weave themselves together to produce a novel rich in historical details, powerful characters, human frailties, sisterhood and feminism, and justice. There’s Lorelei Vogt, the extraordinarily cruel SS officer’s wife, known as the Huntress, who has now become the target of the hunt. My favorite character is Nina Markova, a natural born aviator, one of Russia’s legendary Night Witches, an all-female night bomber regiment attacking the Germans night after night. Nina’s fearlessness and cunning result in her being the only witness to escape the Huntress alive. Caught between Lorelei and Nina, is Jordan McBride, a young Bostonian who dreams of a career as a photographer.Jordan’s world is turned upside down when her widowed father introduces her to his new fiancée. At first Jordan is happy that her father has found someone to love, but then she starts noticing things about the German widow that concern her. Soon she uncovers secrets that may endanger her life as she becomes caught up in a quest for justice led by Ian Graham, a British journalist who has become a Nazi Hunter. The murderer of his all too trusting brother is his #1 target – the Huntress. While this is a well-researched historical thriller, I also loved the story’s lighter moments, usually involving the witty Nina. She will shock you, she will make you roar with laughter, she is tough and crude. Nina is a character you absolutely cannot help loving.
  • (5/5)
    I loved The Alice Network and didn’t know if Kate Quinn could top it but boy did she. The character development in this novel is pristine and I found myself wanting to hunt Die Jagerin along side Ian and Tony. This book was amazing and the ending was insane. I’m a Kate Quinn fan for life.
  • (4/5)
    Once again, Kate Quinn has written a story with compelling characters. Quinn’s previous novel, The Alice Network, was hard to put down and she’s done it again with The Huntress. We have several unique points of view telling their stories about WW II.Ian Graham was a war correspondent but he’s burnt out after witnessing so much horror. Currently Ian and his partner Tony are Nazi hunters. The big score would be the elusive Die Jägerin – a female killer (the Huntress) who mercilessly killed anyone in her path, including women and children. Ian Graham has a personal interest in her as she is evidently responsible for his young soldier brother’s death. Nina is a Russian aviator with quite an interesting back story. She is a Siberian “night witch” who flies with her all female comrades in WW II. I really felt for Nina, all she endured, yet she’s the toughest of the bunch. Dangerous, skillful, sexy and extremely driven. Our author did her homework about the Russian female aviators. There really was a “night witch” group who served their country.Last and certainly not least is Jordan McBride. She’s a young woman living with her widowed father in Boston. She has a passion for photography, her dream job would be a photographic journalist, traveling the world. In the 1950’s a career is not encouraged, as much as sh’d love to attend college her father doesn’t approve. When dad meets a young German widow his life changes, as does Jordan’s life. Her story dovetails with the other three mentioned above.I enjoyed every story line, every perspective and can recommend this to anyone who enjoyed The Alice Network. Once again Kate Quinn hits it out of the park.Foodie references weren’t abundant but Nina could tuck into a hamburger with such gusto that Ian enjoyed watching her enthusiasm. She had a style of putting jam in tea (I’m not trying that) and there were mentions of borscht, a Thanksgiving dinner and 1950/60’s comfort food from the McBride’s kitchen.Thanks to LibraryThing for the advanced readers copy of this book.
  • (4/5)
    My second Kate Quinn book and I will look forward to her next works. Four parallel histories told primarily through flashbacks develop the characters very nicely. Nina's story highlights a little known aspect of WW2, The Night Witches. These women, flying an airplane equivalent of the flivver were a small but instrumental aspect of the Soviets victory over the Germans. The ironic ending suitably concludes this quite good story.
  • (5/5)
    The Huntress kept me reading late into the night (morning?) as I found it very hard to put down. The only reason I did was because I simply could not keep my eyes open any longer. This tale of a woman who heartlessly kills and then goes on to live as a normal American housewife is startling. Ms. Quinn based her characters on real people so the story is all the more horrifying.There are several timelines, people and story lines to keep track of as you delve into this dark time in history. WWII has ended but there are those that are still seeking the perpetrators of the Final Solution who have gone into hiding since the end of the war. Trying to find them where they hide in plain sight and send them for trial so that they pay for the crimes they committed. Ian and Tony work together to bring these Nazis out of their holes but one particular woman has been a long term target – she is known as The Huntress and it’s as if she has vanished from the earth.Only one person has escaped from her – Nina, a member of the Russian air force. She was part of a squadron known to the Germans as the night witches. She knows the face of The Huntress and is the one who can identify her. She joins forces with the two men as she has her own reasons for wanting her brought to justice.The various plots and time lines are handled seamlessly. The action moves back and forth between what is the current time in the book (the 1950ies) and the war years. There The Huntress becomes the hunted and it becomes a matter of whether she will be brought to justice or escape again.This is a truly compelling read that is still haunting me. I know I keep saying that I have sworn off WWII novels but something about this one called to me. It’s post war so I figured it wouldn’t have me dealing with too many battles and it didn’t. It is more a chase book as the three hunters try and catch their prey to right one more wrong from a horrible war. The writing draws you into the different time periods and different worlds of the main characters. It’s one I’ll want to read again.
  • (4/5)
    Kate Quinn is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors as a result of her impressive research & writing skills displayed in both The Alice Network & The Huntress. Interwoven plot lines told from alternating characters points of view in dual timelines once again create a compelling page turning read that I just couldn't put down. Sign me up for all of Quinn's future works because I'm a fan!
  • (5/5)
    Just as good if not better than The Alice Network by the same author. Highly researched and well written, this one's a page turner that does not disappoint. Loved the way the author brought in some of the characters from The Alice Network. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    With three strong female protagonists, a couple of Nazi hunters and an unknowing family, Kate Quinn really blended what I worried would be three unique alternating stories into one well done book. If I ever knew, I had forgotten that Russia allowed women in combat during WWII. The story of Nina and her brave aviator friends wound the feel of the war through the story, and the hardships and changes Russia was undergoing while fighting the Nazis. Ian's "present" day of the novel (around 1950), helps detail why some were still hunting Nazis when the main trials were over and many just wanted life to go back to a sense of normal. Within that is the story of Jordan, a young Boston woman who hopes to become a photographer, and her family, newly enlarged by her dad's new Austrian wife, Anneliese/Anna. It was a very long book, but truly kept my interest with well researched details and a lot of mysterious speculation.
  • (4/5)
    Kate Quinn’s latest novel, ‘The Huntress’ is an intriguing story about a hunt for a woman who has committed unspeakable war crimes by murdering numerous people, even innocent children. Ian Graham, a famous WWII correspondent, initiates a chase for Lorelei Vogt, the huntress who unflinchingly murdered his brother in cold blood. His gregarious partner, Tony Rodomovsky, as well as Nina Markova, a spunky Soviet fighter pilot of the Night Witches regiment, assist him. Meanwhile, Jordan McBride resides in Boston as an aspiring photographer who helps out at her father, Daniel McBride’s antique shop. At first Jordon is slightly distrustful of her father’s new mysterious, fiancé and then wife Annaliesse, and she eventually shrugs off her suspicions and develops a genuine love for Annaliesse and her quiet, young daughter. Although this story was very fascinating, especially Nina’s reclusive, Siberian childhood and then her ambitious stint flying many dangerous missions with the Night Witches, at times I wished for some brevity to this tale. Kate Quinn definitely presents a complete, while not compact, story enriched by multiple perspectives, which makes for a detailed, and riveting account about the hunt for a dangerous killer.
  • (5/5)
    Author Kate Quinn's previous novel, The Alice Network, was about a female spy network in World War II France that helped the Allies defeat the Germans. It was a best-seller and even today still resides on the paperback best-seller list. Her new novel, The Huntress, is also partially set in World War II. Following the war, Ian, a Brit, and Tony, an American, have teamed up to find Nazis who have escaped punishment for their crimes. They are looking for a Polish woman known as the Huntress, who is known to have slaughtered innocent children. Nina is a Russian woman who escapes her hardscrabble life to join a cadre of female fighter pilots. The most interesting parts of this big, sprawling novel deal with Nina's experiences as a fighter pilot. The Russians created a team of all-female fighter pilots who had to work twice as hard as the male pilots to prove themselves worthy. Nina found a family among these women, and the descriptions of their battles is heart-pounding on the page. Nina has personal reasons for wanting to find the Huntress, and joins up with Tony and Ian, who have a lead that the Huntress may be hiding in America. They turn the tables on the Huntress, as she now becomes the hunted.In a small Massachusetts town, a teenage girl named Jordan is happy that her widowed father has finally found love again with Anna, an immigrant widowed mother of a young girl. They have become a happy new family, but something nags at Jordan about her stepmother.All of these stories intersect in an intriguing way, and Quinn certainly knows how to ratchet up the tension in this thrilling story. Sharp-eyed fans of The Alice Network will recognize a cameo appearance by one of the main characters from that novel.
  • (5/5)
    I loved reading this one! A great blend of action, intrigue and romance complete with a cast of likable characters. Each one with their story to tell and it’s told well. For some background information it would help to read up on the subject of the Night Witches and their exploits during World War II (which is a fascinating subject on its’ own)Of all the stories to read, Nina’s naturally, is the most interesting. She’s a wild child, does her own thing and doesn’t care about norms, conventions, and rules. She does her own thing but joins up with her squad not because of the love of her land and country but because she loves to fly. It’s her passion and it shows. I love reading about Nina because of her free spirited attitude and her drive. It’s what keeps her going. The plot is free flowing and the chapters goes back and forth time-wise, and changes perspective depending on the character. Besides Nina, Jordan’s point of view is also interesting. She’s also got an independent streak in her and it’s nice to see her go on her own path based on her decisions. It’s unheard of back then in the day (we’re talking about 1950’s here) so it’s nice to read.The writing is excellent and it grabs your attention from page one. I rather wish there was a small glossary to see what Nina says in Russian (although I’m sure it’s rather colorful language) but other than that small bit, the characters are engaging, and it’s nice how they all come together in the last third of the book. The Author’s Note is also good for explaining what she’s done historical speaking wise. If you are stickler for history perhaps this isn’t for you - it’s more character and story driven. Still an engrossing read and greatly recommended!
  • (4/5)
    The Huntress is an interesting, but flawed novel. It is the story of a band of Nazi hunters who get caught up in chasing a woman who is also a war criminal. She is important to them for personal reasons as well as the normal reason of seeking justice that has motivated all their past searches. The novel switches back and forth between the perspective of this group and the point of view of Jordan, a young American woman whose mother died when she was seven. Jordan's father has chosen an Austrian woman to be his second wife, but Jordan has mixed feelings about her stepmother to be.The story of the Nazi hunters starts out powerfully with a description of the crimes committed by the woman they are chasing, while Jordan's story takes a little while longer to get going. Although the book could have been tightened more in editing, once the American scenes get going it reads well.One of the Nazi hunters is a Russian woman from the shores of Lake Baikal in Siberia. She's a tough individual who has led a rough life with an alcoholic and abusive father. Her story is fascinating and fun to read. She makes a nice balance with Jordan, who is leading a typical life in post World War II America, but also has an inner strength motivated by her dream to be a professional photographer. These two characters make the book special.The main problem I had with the novel was its ending. I won't spoil the book by telling specifics, but I will say there were some scenes I found unrealistic.Steve Lindahl – author of Motherless Soul, White Horse Regressions, Hopatcong Vision Quest, and Under a Warped Cross.
  • (5/5)
    This story has all the elements of what I love most in a historic fiction novel -- a well-researched setting that includes real life events, complex multi-faceted characters, and a plot that keeps you glued to the book until the very end. Set after WWII and the Nuremberg trials, a team continues to hunt for Nazi war criminals. The target is The Huntress, a Nazi who hunted and shot Poles as if they were game and was responsible for the deaths of many children. The team looking for the Huntress is a motley group -- an English journalist, an American who fought in the war, and Nina, a member of the Soviet Night Witches, an elite group of female pilots who ran bombing missions against the Nazis. I can't wait to read more from this author!Thank you to Library Thing for the Early Reviewer ARC.
  • (4/5)
    I have yet to read a Kate Quinn novel I didn’t like. She has a sure touch for developing relatable characters and putting them into exciting situations. Quinn’s skill pulls the reader from page to page and ensures reluctance to put the book down. The Huntress delivers that magic in this tale of Nazi hunters in post-WWII.The “present” story-line is mostly told from British former war correspondent Ian Graham’s point of view, covering a seven month period from April to October 1950. Deeply damaged by his experiences in the war and coverage of the Nuremberg trials, Ian gives up journalism to become a Nazi hunter. His partner is an American ex-GI (and one-quarter Jew) Tony Rodomovsky, who spent the war as an interpreter and has something to prove. He uses his charm and language skills to great effect. They are joined in their search for a Nazi known as the Huntress by Graham’s war bride Nina Markova—the only known person who had faced the murderer and still lived.Nina was my favorite character—a thorough barbarian raised as a wild child in remote Siberia. Her fictional history (based on true events) is told in a separate story line in chapters covering her flying career in the fabled regiment of Soviet women bomber pilots known as the Night Witches. Nina is contrasted with the Huntress. Both are hard, pragmatic, survivors and killers, but Nina is constrained and elevated by her lovers and friends.Nina, Ian, and Tony track the Huntress across the Atlantic to Boston where they meet Jordon McBride, a young woman who wants to be a photographer. In typical 1950’s fashion, Jordon has put her dreams of college and a career on hold out of deference to her father’s wishes and the expectations of her boyfriend. Early in the book, Jordon McBride’s story is set in the summer of 1946 where we meet Jordon’s step-mother, a German refugee with a sweet four-year-old daughter. It then skips into the present story-line in May 1950 with Jordon working in her father’s antique shop and reluctantly planning her fall wedding.Quinn juggles these alternating timelines and backstories with consummate skill, weaving the narrative so that the reader is always clear what is happening and when. She carefully builds her story and characters. Her craft also shows in meticulous historical details and deft use of themes. The reader feels the cold and danger of flying in an open cockpit plane to drop bombs on the Eastern Nazi front; learns about the difficulty and tedium of hunting war criminals during a time when everyone wants to forget the war; and suffers the disappointment of a talented young woman told over and over that her skill at photography is just a hobby and she should be happy to “settle down” with her high school sweetheart. These individual narratives are linked by big picture themes: vengeance vs. justice, the redemptive nature of love, overcoming crippling fears to move on in life, and the banality of evil.This last item brings me to the title character. Throughout the book, the Huntress is deliberately shadowy/opaque. In the opening Prologue, set in 1945, she realizes she has become the hunted. She makes her excuses: her crimes were legal under Nazi law, her murders were mercy killings, many did much worse. She makes the decision to hide until the storm of vengeance passes. A news article by Ian Graham details her crimes and sets up his obsession with finding her.As a reader, I couldn’t get a handle on the Huntress and her motivations. After reading Quinn’s Author’s Note, I understood why. The Huntress is based on two actual women convicted of Nazi war crimes. Quinn said, “After long hours researching both women, I am still at an utter loss to understand why they committed the crimes they did.” Having a shadowy figure as the antagonist worked for most of the book until the climax. At the point vengeance was taken or justice was served (I won’t spoil the moment!), I felt vaguely dissatisfied.That said, I found the action-packed climax thrilling. It was only after my heart quit racing and my breathing slowed, that my mind took over and asked the questions: What effect did the climax have on the Huntress? Did she feel aggrieved, defiant, justified, relieved…? Was she a banally evil woman “going along” with the Nazi regime or was she a purely evil psychopath given free rein? Or was she something more complicated and nuanced? Knowing that, would have added an additional layer of understanding/satisfaction to the last couple of chapters. Not knowing didn’t spoil the book. I found The Huntress a very satisfying read. Highly recommended.Note: I received an advance reader’s copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my unbiased review.
  • (3/5)
    I had such a hard time with this novel, kept putting it down, picking it back up, finally finished with mixed feelings. What I liked:All the parts that pertain to Nina, she was by far my favorite character.Reading about the Russian women and their piloting adventures.The amount of research that went into this book, which is detailed in the authors note.Also appreciate said note, telling the reader was was factual and what was not. What I had difficulties with.The present day story, Jordan and her family. Just seemed trite after the intensity of the other chapters. Never quite bought into those parts of the story.The length, this was much to long, longer than I wanted it to be.Other reviewers loved this, didn't have the same reactions I had. Best always if you have an interest to read yourself and form your own opinions.ARC from Netgalley.
  • (3/5)
    THE HUNTRESS is historical fiction (during and after World War II), with chapters devoted to the separate stories of three people: Nina, Russian fighter pilot, Ian, journalist turned Nazi hunter, and Jordan, teenage photographer. All three seek the huntress. Therefore, before long their stories come together as they have the common goal of seeing that the huntress is brought to trial.Jordan’s chapters are too young adultish. Nina’s chapters are too wordy. Ian’s chapters often portray Nina as a joke. All chapters sometimes strain the imagination.But ignore that and you’ll enjoy the story.I won an ARC of THE HUNTRESS from William Morrow through LibraryThing.com.
  • (5/5)
    *I received a copy of this book through LibraryThing Early Reviewers.*I wonder if Kate Quinn could be convinced to write nothing but WWII-themed novels? Because as much as I enjoyed what she wrote of Ancient Rome and Renaissance Italy, few things I've read have what this novel and The Alice Network had. The characters in this novel - Nina, Ian, Jordan, Tony, the Huntress - are both extraordinary and utterly believable. I especially love Nina, the Soviet bomber pilot turned Nazi hunter, who was both pragmatic and hilarious and terrifying. These are characters I was sad to leave after 500 pages. I doubt I'll see them again, but I will be eagerly awaiting the author's next novel.
  • (4/5)
    Tumbling through World War II Eastern Europe and 1950's Boston, The Huntress by Kate Quinn is a (mostly) fast-paced novel that will engage readers from the first page. The story centers on the hunt for a German woman, nicknamed The Huntress, who killed Jewish children, prisoners of war, and refugees during World War II. On the hunt are an English journalist, American ex-GI, and a former pilot for the Soviet Union.Their hunt takes them to Boston, where they meet young Jordan McBridge, a budding photographer and daughter of an antiques dealer. Without giving away too much of the plot, the Nazi hunters and Jordan must unravel dead-end leads and "things right under their noses" to find the elusive Huntress.I enjoyed the characters, especially Nina, who was part of the "Night Witches" - a battalion of Soviet female pilots serving during World War II. I found her backstory to be compelling, and I loved her spunk. Honestly, the whole book could have been about Nina, and I would have been satisfied.I found the ending to drag on a bit and wondered if another edit could have reduced the book by another 100 pages or so. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to fans of historical fiction, especially of the World War II era.
  • (5/5)
    This book about Nazi hunters tracking a war criminal only known as the Huntress is another great book by Kate Quinn. Told through three points of view, the story moves from Europe to Boston. Ian, a former British journalist leads the team. Nina, a Russian bomber pilot and my favorite character, joins the team because of her personal experience with the Huntress. And then there is Jordon, whose father marries a woman from Poland who she can’t bring herself to trust. I loved this novel! I will never understand how any person can commit such atrocities, especially a woman. Loved the cameo appearance of Eve from the Alice network. And I cannot wait for the author’s next book!
  • (5/5)
    Another free early reviewers book, thank youThis is a wonderful story. Extremely well written with great characters.It is historical fiction such that it’s based on mainly a time period during WWII and shortly thereafter- about a small group of Nazi hunters and interwoven their stories that brought them to this work. Some of the story is based on real persons/groups.This is one of the best books I’ve read in some time. If you read The Nightengale by Kristin Hannahand liked it I think you will enjoy this book too.
  • (4/5)
    Really liked this one, but who is the true huntress? Nice cameo appearance of an The Alice Network character. Thank you Library thing and the publishers for sending this copy. Full review to come eventually, if not sooner.
  • (5/5)
    This book was great! A story that takes place after WWII and the hunt for Nazis to bring them to face justice for their war crimes.Each chapter centers around the 3 main characters and it does goes back and forth in time. But it's easy to follow. The story is about a small team of Nazi hunters and their search for the Huntress. Reading the background stories of Ian and Nina we learn why this "hunt" and capture is so important to them. Jordan, the other main character, has no idea that the woman her father has recently married is a Nazi war criminal but she has her suspicions that something just isn't right with her new stepmom.We learn of Nina's life during the war as part of the Soviet Unions all female night bombers called the Night Witches and what her home life was like before learning to fly. We hear about Ian's background as a war correspondent and his reason for wanting to track down the Huntress. Then Jordan who wants to be a photographer while unraveling her new stepmothers past. I thought the book moved quickly and each persons story was very interesting clear up to the end where all the pieces fall into place...Ian, Nina and Jordan. For me a really good read.I also read The Alice Network by this same author. Kate Quinn writes really good stories/books. Can't wait for the next read.