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A Very Large Expanse of Sea: A Novel

A Very Large Expanse of Sea: A Novel

Scritto da Tahereh Mafi

Narrato da Priya Ayyar


A Very Large Expanse of Sea: A Novel

Scritto da Tahereh Mafi

Narrato da Priya Ayyar

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (453 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Oct 16, 2018
ISBN:
9780062888198
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

From the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Shatter Me series comes a powerful, heartrending contemporary novel about fear, first love, and the devastating impact of prejudice.

It's 2002, a year after 9/11. It's an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who's tired of being stereotyped.

Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She's tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments—even the physical violence—she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she's built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother.

But then she meets Ocean James. He's the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her—they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds—and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she's not sure she'll ever be able to let it down.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Oct 16, 2018
ISBN:
9780062888198
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Tahereh Mafi is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling and National Book Award longlisted author of An Emotion of Great Delight, A Very Large Expanse of Sea, the Shatter Me series, Furthermore, and Whichwood. You can find her online just about anywhere @TaherehMafi or on her website, www.taherehmafi.com.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Why people so terrible?
    I feel related to Shirin because I am Muslim and wear hijab too.
    Really like the story and how Shirin character develop..
    Love Ocean James so much.. can't you be real and be mine T.T

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    It's 2002, America is still reeling from the 9/11 attacks, & Shirin and her family,Iranian immigrants, move often; she's moved once again from California to a new town, new high school, new casual cruelty and misunderstanding. Shirin wears the hijab, not because her parents demand it, but for her own reasons- as a part of her religious identity. But an Iranian girl with a headscarf invites stares, taunts, even attacks - so Shirin disappears into herself, her music off her I pod, her journal, & break dancing with her older brother and his friends. And then Ocean James begins to try to chat w/her- he's her lab partner, and while Shirin struggles to keep up her aloof, cold demeanor, his genuine efforts to get to know her begin to break down her barriers. What follows is a growing romance story between a star jock, a handsome white boy and a beautiful Iranian girl - and what Shirin knows will surely come. "Ocean's presence doesn't make her life any less complicated, but he does begin to push her outside of her shell, and she not only broadens his horizons but likes him without the frills of his popularity. The stakes get higher, though, once she realizes just how popular he is, and how much backlash he's facing for supporting her. We all like a good forbidden romance — just ask Shakespeare — but in this case, Ocean and Shirin's relationship and the systematic way their peers and adults try to tear them apart is a brutal spectacle, compounded by the pressure Shirin faces to sacrifice her wants for what she's told are Ocean's best interests.And it's hard to figure out Ocean's appeal at times. He appears to be an allegorical figure, a physical manifestation of humanity's light side whose goodness almost compensates for everyone else's myopia. (Naivete and unquestioning acceptance are virtues, for Ocean.) He's also unaware of the full power of his white privilege until he gets involved with Shirin and the realization of it fractures the bubble he's lived in his entire life. It often seems that they're separated by what feels like a large sea of cultural differences. But even as he's grappling with the horrors of privilege, he's still kind enough, respectful enough to temper her cynicism and help her become someone unafraid to dip a toe into untested waters — so to speak" (Kamrun Nesa "Prejudice Complicates the Course of Love..." NPR-Review. 20 Oct 2018.Online) Great first person narrative, esp for Muslim girls, or girls - fast read. Fans of The Fault in Our Stars, or other such stories (doomed, desperate first love) will embrace this story. Long-listed for Nobel Prize-Lit for YA
  • (5/5)
    amazing. amazing amazing. ended up loving this book more thanks to the incredible narrator
  • (5/5)
    Wiw, just wow. Amazing book, definetly would read again?I loved it
  • (4/5)
    I thought this book was cute. I liked the Romance. I also liked the moral of the story and I particularly loved the very end though it seemed pretty unremarkable. The narrator was great. It was easy to fall into the story. To feel like I was the one reading and not all audio books can do that.
  • (4/5)
    My favourite part of the book has to be OCEAN himself!!
    And the breakdancing too ;)

    Link to my Goodreads review:
    https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2678791383?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1
  • (5/5)
    My favorite book ever omg my heart is so in love with this book ??
  • (5/5)
    Very well written and important read. The characters were complex and amazing, the romance had the roles reversed and I love Shirin. Hands down one of the best books I have ever read.
  • (5/5)
    Loved every bit of this. I love all of Tahereh Mafi’s books!
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book so much. This was such and interesting, captivating and enthralling read.
  • (4/5)
    Shirin starts at a new high school, her Iranian-American parents are always chasing the American dream, trying to give their children a better school, better opportunity. Shirin has not just a rock, but a boulder on her shoulder. In the shadow of 9/11, it isn't easy being a girl who wears a hijab. She's skeptical when Ocean works to befriend her. There is something between them. She works to stop it, discourage it as she knows how hard it might ultimately be for Ocean. But she gives in to her feelings for him. For awhile it is okay, but soon the racism bubbling comes out and Ocean, a basketball start who doesn't have a passion for the game, doesn't handle it well. He lashes out and Shirin doesn't want him to loose opportunities. A side activity is the breakdance club that Shirin joins with her brother, Navid, and his new friends. Her brother is a favorite character of mine. Her parents aren't super involved in her school life, but her brother always has her back. This book was heartbreaking at times, a compelling whirlwind romance, and a strong character study of a marginalized girl trying to survive high school.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this story so much I couldn't sleep until I devoured it all
  • (5/5)
    i love this book so much ?? ocean, i want to have your kids
  • (4/5)
    Sometimes YA novels go overboard by trying to tackle every YA theme. A Very Large Expanse of the Sea goes after racism. It shows stereotypes and what might be going on inside the minds of those being generalized. A strong, smart female protagonist! I can't wait to recommend this to students.
  • (4/5)
    This realistic fiction novel depicts living life dealing with racism.The novel takes place shortly after 9-11, so Americans freely express their hatred toward anyone Muslim. Shirin wears a head scarf, which makes her an obvious target. Seriously threatened in the past, Sharin learns how to ignore them. By ignoring them, she develops a lot of bitterness and hatred, which makes her a little mean. Her potty mouth and attitude keep her isolated but safe (the potty mouth tapers off as Shirin moves from ignorance to knowledge in her journey). Until Ocean. Her family moves frequently as her parents climb the American ladder of dreams. In her new town, Shirin is assigned Ocean as her lab partner. He desires to be her friend. He truly does not care that she is Muslim and wears a head scarf. He finds her beautiful and interesting. He eventually breaks through her barriers and she agrees to date him.The star basketball player dating a head-scarf-wearing Muslim leads to rampant hatred originating from racism. Shirin tries to explain what dating her will entail for his life, but he doesn't care. Ocean possesses little in his life--no passions for anything and no one who seems to care. Shirin provides love and someone who cares about him and not his basketball abilities. Needless to say, he experiences life where people are racist and full of hate, willing to say hurtful things and physically harm another person. He never cared for the people around him, but the truth of their true selves disappoints him so much that it's almost more than he cares to be a part of. The novel solely revolves around assumptions we all make and the way we justify our treatment of others. Even Shirin recognizes this prejudice in herself. It's also a look at America--what people are willing to do--blindly--in the name of patriotism. I am glad Shirin explains why she wears the head scarf. As a female, I've always had a hard time understanding the scarf. If the men wore it as well, I would understand more. Her explanation was helpful. This novel makes you look in the mirror and look at others and be truthful--how do you treat others? It's an important book. I still think there are a few inconsistencies, and Shirin's vacillating about whether she should talk to Ocean or not wore thin. It's still very much worth your time to read and think about the value of humanity.
  • (5/5)
    Sweet love story that brings ugly stereotypes to light. Light quick, feel-good read.
  • (5/5)
    This book is so raw and real about the struggles that people who look differently, speak differently, or are from a different religion go through on a daily basis. It’s not right that we judge people to the point that Shirin was in this book. We are human beings, cut from the same cloth, and I feel like this book does an amazing job at giving an eye opening look at what it’s like to grow up Muslim after 9/11.
  • (5/5)
    I loved it, the presentation was very simple and easy to understand. First read of 2020 and more to come ❤️
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    One of the best books I’ve read in a while. Electric and emotional, Mafi, speaks for those who have not been heard. This one will stay with me. So glad I happened upon it.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    A book all should read, not just YA - and not just or the romance but the REALITY of Shirin's situation. As a teacher, I was angered by the teacher's behavior. As a human, I was enraged at the attitude of others....so much so that is still prevalent in our world today - sadly!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Amazing book....intense, raw and honest. I loved everything about it!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    The narration was amazing!! Loved the voice!! Beautiful book❤️

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

    3.8 ?
    I really did enjoy this but I wasn't 100% obsessed with it. Yes I liked most of the characters, the plot was shocking and thought provoking but I genuinely wasn't the biggest fan of the relationship. Max

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    love love love love it! one of the best audiobooks I've ever listened <3

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    "A Very Large Expanse of Sea" dealt with some serious issues and gave an eye-opening account of one teenage, Muslim girl's struggles to be accepted at school post 9/11. I hated how Shirin was treated by her peers and sympathised with her pain and anger. Daily she had to endure racial slurs and derogatory comments. Shirin was a funny, intelligent protagonist but, I felt at times, she handled situations too aggressively. However, I admired her strength and fierceness and the fact that she loved to break-dance, and her vulnerability was heartbreaking.I also loved Ocean and his strength of character. He truly cared for Shirin and refused to be pushed away, regardless of how he was treated by the locals or how many times Shirin tried to end their relationship. It took him a while to realise the extent of the hatred poured out on Shirin because of her religion. Despite the sweet romance that blossomed between the two teens, I felt that it soon became the prime focus of the book which impacted on the big issues, which was disappointing.My biggest complaint, however, was the overuse of the word 'wow'. I found it very annoying and wanted to give the author a thesaurus to help her choose other alternatives. However," A Very Large Expanse of Sea" was still an enjoyable read and a relevant one.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I want more, ???please make book number 2. Awesome reading.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    i like it, except where they kissed and everything, because im a muslim myself, and i know its against the law of muslim. but overall, the narration is good and i love it.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile