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The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy

The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy

Scritto da Mackenzi Lee

Narrato da Moira Quirk


The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy

Scritto da Mackenzi Lee

Narrato da Moira Quirk

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (438 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
11 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Oct 2, 2018
ISBN:
9780062855947
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

In this highly anticipated sequel to the New York Times bestselling The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, Felicity Montague must use all her womanly wits and wiles to achieve her dreams of becoming a doctor—even if she has to scheme her way across Europe to do it. A must-have for fans of Mackenzi Lee's extraordinary and Stonewall Honor-winning novel.

A year after an accidentally whirlwind grand tour with her brother Monty, Felicity Montague has returned to England with two goals in mind—avoid the marriage proposal of a lovestruck suitor from Edinburgh and enroll in medical school. However, her intellect and passion will never be enough in the eyes of the administrators, who see men as the sole guardians of science.

But then a window of opportunity opens—a doctor she idolizes is marrying an old friend of hers in Germany. Felicity believes if she could meet this man he could change her future, but she has no money of her own to make the trip. Luckily, a mysterious young woman is willing to pay Felicity's way, so long as she's allowed to travel with Felicity disguised as her maid.

In spite of her suspicions, Felicity agrees, but once the girl's true motives are revealed, Felicity becomes part of a perilous quest that leads them from the German countryside to the promenades of Zurich to secrets lurking beneath the Atlantic.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Oct 2, 2018
ISBN:
9780062855947
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Mackenzi Lee holds a BA in history and an MFA from Simmons College in writing for children and young adults. Her short fiction and nonfiction has appeared in Atlas Obscura, the Boston Globe, Crixeo, and the Newport Review, among others. Her debut novel, This Monstrous Thing, won the PEN New England–Susan P. Bloom Children’s Book Discovery Award. Her second book, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, was a New York Times bestseller and an ABA bestseller, earned five starred reviews, was a #1 Indie Next Pick, and received a 2018 Stonewall Book Award Honor and a New England Book Award. She loves Diet Coke, sweater weather, and Star Wars. On a perfect day, she can be found enjoying all three. She currently calls Boston home, where she works as an independent bookstore manager and pets every dog she meets. www.mackenzilee.com

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy

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438 valutazioni / 25 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    I love this book! The protagonists are well-drawn and complex. There's representation galore! And the plot explores a number of important topics (misogyny, imperialism, conservation, heteronormativity) with grace and compassion. Plus there's a super-cute proto-romance.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this audiobook just as much as The Gentleman's Guide. Lee writes funny, action-packed, adventurous and original YA historical fiction, and I just love her characters. Felicity, Johanna, and Sim are strong female characters, and it was fun to catch glimpses of Monty and Percy again, too.
  • (4/5)
    I'll be honest- the plot kind of lost me at times, but the characters were absolutely wonderful. I had such affection for each member of the trio of girls - and I love that Felicity is not without her flaws. The book rips apart the garbage "not like other girls" trope and makes a very clear statement that feminine qualities do not equal weakness or silliness. I adored that Felicity is, as I suspected in the first book, asexual! And seemingly aromantic as well! Hooray! Representation! AND she gets to use her medical skills in a realistic and satisfying way. I really hope there's a third book in the works because there is still a lot of story left for the Montague siblings.
  • (4/5)
    One of last year's surprise favorites was A Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue. It was the perfect combination of historic fiction, bawdy humor and heart throbbing romance. So this year's sequel was very highly anticipated. But, we all know how tough it can be to follow a bestselling first in a series. No worries and no sophomore slump here! This fun Victorian romp follows the adventures of Monty's sister Felicity as she tries to break the gender barrier and be admitted into the all-male world of medical school. Fun and entertaining with just the right amount of feminism.
  • (4/5)
    This is the second book in the Montague Siblings/Guide series. This was a good book but not as good as the first book in the Montague Siblings series. I felt like the story here was really unfinished and the pacing was a bit slow.Felicity spends a lot of the book running around trying to get to her ultimate goal of becoming a medical student and eventually practitioner but things are left really open at the end.I didn't feel like this story was quite as engaging as the first book. Felicity spent a lot of time preaching about women's rights which I know were (and still are) a big deal but there was so much time spent on this the book felt a bit...preachy...at points.All the above aside...I enjoyed the characters and this was a quick and easy read. The story is entertaining and fun. It's a great read if you are looking for a light Victorian novel with some subtle fantasy. There really isn't any romance in here; so if you are looking for the level of romance that was in the Gentleman's Guide book you won't find it here. This is more of a girl power book.Overall this was a good book and made for an entertaining and light read. I enjoyed it but didn’t fall in love with it like I did the Gentlemen’s Guide. I will definitely be keeping an eye out to see what Mackenzi decided to write next.
  • (5/5)
    Great sequel, wonderful narration! I highly enjoyed this book,
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant, wonderful and complex characters and plot. Witty and smart and definitely a contender for my favourite book
  • (4/5)
    Great feminist piece of fiction with an aromantic and asexual MC and great and lovable strong female characters.
  • (5/5)
    I needed more Monty, hope the sequel can engage more on them two
  • (3/5)
    Last year The gentleman guide to vice and virtue made it to my favorite books of 2017 so you can imagine how excited I was to read this story related to his sister Felicity. I was so hyped so I´m not sure if that´s to blame but I was kind of disappointed by it. I felt the book was too long but with no reason since the story had a single point of view and it was not as interesting as the first one.
    I would say that the medical history and timeline was super interesting and felt supper accurate for the year the book was happening in but I wanted to see so much more from Felicity, Joanna and Sim! As this is a LGBT+ book I would have expected a heavier character development and more feelings that the ones I got from the book. I wanted to know more about Felicity not only the fact she wanted to be a doctor in a world ruled by mens, and I wanted to see her standing more for what she believed and not just agreeing to what the end of the book gave us. I do think the end was kind of rush and more focused on Joanna´s future than on hers.
    Overall I did enjoy the story and I would recommend you reading it is an Ok book that did not blew me away.
    In regards to the audiobook I think the narrator did a good job on doing different voices for the characters but I do think there was lack of emotion on it, and it felt a little bit flat for me. I would prefer this one in written format than the audio one.
  • (5/5)
    This sequel could not have been bettered. It is an extremely satisfying adventure.
  • (4/5)
    Moira Quirk is an excellent narrator, and really helped bring this book to life. If you're struggling to read the novel as I was, give this a listen.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely love felicity’s story, I would love to know what will happen to her and the rest after this book!
  • (5/5)
    What a scrumptious book with delightful language and a fantastic story.
  • (4/5)
    Audiobook. Muchly enjoyed this one too. It is a bit slow to get going - takes to half way before adventure really takes off. Great fun then though.
  • (5/5)
    After reading The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, I didn’t think this book could top it. I was so attached to Percy and Monty as well as the LGBTQ+ representation as someone who is part of that community. But as I moved onto this book I loved Felicity with all my heart, beginning to end as I listened to her grow and change in values and make realizations. The book is spectacularly diverse and each character learns to appreciate themselves and others for the unique souls they are. My favorite part of this book is the theme of true feminism. As Felicity faces the trials of pursuing medicine in a man’s world she learns not only to appreciate herself for the woman she is rather than trying to mimic the men in the field, but also learns to appreciate other women for their unique interests and brilliant minds. The book is full of adventure, courage, wit, and solidarity amongst women.
  • (4/5)
    This action packed young adult feminist tale deals with the 'not like other girls' problematic in a great way by giving us a protagonist who already knows that she is no less than a man when the novel begins but grows to understand the problems of her perceived superiority over other women.
    Over the course of the novel, Felicity gets to meet Johanna and Sim, both very different and very amazing, while being at sea and traveling to far off destinations. She learns to respect women who enjoy their femininity, are interested in romance, and do not care for male validation, realizing that not only are women not less than men but also not less than each other.

    "Everyone has heard stories of women like us. Cautionary tales. Morality plays. Warnings of what will befall you if you are a girl too wild for the world. A girl who asks too many questions or wants too much. If you set off into the world alone. Everyone has heard stories of women like us. And now, we will make more of them."
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this! I thought it had a lot of great things to say about internalized misogyny, which is something we definitely don't get enough of in YA titles! Would certainly recommend this to anyone who enjoyed the first installment in the series, but I also don't think you HAVE to read that one to enjoy this. If you're looking for a powerful, fun cast of ladies and some great conversations about what it means to be a woman, or what it means to find your path in life, check this out!
  • (5/5)
    There is a lot to praise in this book, but I'm writing this review because it's one of those books where I didn't realize how much I enjoyed it until I was finished with it. I was dreading the ending as it approached - there's plenty of narrative tension, but additionally, I was sure we were headed for something that was deeply unsatisfying in one way or another because of so many factors - the colonial and sexist mindsets of the various characters, the prominence of an aspec character (when so many stories go poorly for aspec characters), but it's been months since I finished and I just can't stop thinking about how satisfying this book was. It's one of those that really sells the happy ending well, it doesn't seem too fanciful or convenient or coincidental, partially because it's different than the happy ending that the protagonist was planning and working towards. It's a good one and it stuck with me. I'd say I was wishing for a sequel if I didn't think that saying that is a huge jinx.
  • (4/5)
    I like it!
    Three strong ladies fighting dudes and kicking butt.
    It was an adventure.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely amazing. The characters are loveable, flawed, strong, and so real. It's a great story well thought out, no bumps or edges one might stumble upon. It's YA, but even older Adults will enjoy it immensely. Highly recommended for anyone.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This book is FANTASTIC! It covers a whole range of issues like misogyny, environmental conservation, ingrained patriarchal systems, imperialism, asexuality, and the ills of women judging other women and it does so without becoming preachy or didactic. The characters are wonderfully strong and feel real. I would love to go on an adventure with both of them!I read The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue and really enjoyed that, but this one is even better! Highly recommended!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (2/5)
    I wanted to love this book but it’s just not good
  • (2/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I loved The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, and so I was excited to hear Felicity was getting her book. Then, lo and behold, the only part of Felicity's book I liked was when Monty and Percy (the leads in A Gentleman's Guide for those who did not read that book) popped up. It turned out Felicity was insufferable. She was mean, preachy, superior, judgmental and 100% humorless. The weird, part? Not one of those things was the worst thing about her character. No, the biggest problem was the absolute and utter disregard of history. I like a plucky girl as much as the next person, but that person has to have had some chance of existing in her time. Books that were written near the time the stories were set show independent girls who strove for things that were possible (though not the norm) in their time (see eg, Little Women, Anne of Green Gables, and for nonfiction A Vindication of the Right of Women.) No woman at the time this was set could possibly have had the thoughts, goals, reactions of Felicity, or Johanna, or Sim because they were unimaginable. There is a joke about drawing penises with hats on them on people, like they were all sitting around watching 10 Things I Hate About You the night before. Also they bandied about the word "penis", a word which a well-bred woman at the time would never have uttered and might not even have known. It would be like a Cro-Mag-non woman fantasizing about Netflix Originals. There is no context for those goals or that knowledge. Lee dropped 20th century women (essentially these were unwilling 50's future housewives) into the 19th (18th?) century. I hate when writers do that. Its so lazy and encourages laziness in readers who believe this junk. (I will note here that the ridiculousness and historical inaccuracy of characters extended to all the characters male and female. Alexander was like an evildoer on Scooby Doo. Darn those meddling girls!)This is pure YA fantasy. If you read it as that maybe it works. I don't like fantasy or YA much so take that into account Also, dragons? Puhleez. I listened to the audio, and the reader was really excellent. If I had read this in print I think it would have been a a DNF.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Great audiobook production,and a wonderful sequel. I liked ut Even more than The gentlemans guide to vice and virtue. Felicity is a fantastic MC, ant this was a crazy crazy laugh out loud, suspenceful exciting and empowering ride!