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Tangerine

Tangerine


Tangerine

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (113 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 27, 2018
ISBN:
9780062797988
Formato:
Audiolibro

Nota del redattore

Escapist reads…

This is a juicy novel, and that’s not just a pun about its title. A cinematic debut (it’s already been optioned), “Tangerine” is a Hitchcockian tale of obsession in the seductive chaos of midcentury Morocco.

Descrizione

The last person Alice Shipley expected to see since arriving in Tangier with her new husband was Lucy Mason. After the accident at Bennington, the two friends—once inseparable roommates—haven't spoken in over a year. But there Lucy was, trying to make things right and return to their old rhythms. Perhaps Alice should be happy. She has not adjusted to life in Morocco, too afraid to venture out into the bustling medinas and oppressive heat. Lucy—always fearless and independent—helps Alice emerge from her flat and explore the country. 

But soon a familiar feeling starts to overtake Alice—she feels controlled and stifled by Lucy at every turn. Then Alice's husband, John, goes missing, and Alice starts to question everything around her: her relationship with her enigmatic friend, her decision to ever come to Tangier, and her very own state of mind.

Tangerine is a sharp dagger of an audiobook—a debut so tightly wound, so replete with exotic imagery and charm, so full of precise details and extraordinary craftsmanship, it will leave you absolutely breathless.

Optioned for film by George Clooney's Smokehouse Pictures, with Scarlett Johansson to star.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 27, 2018
ISBN:
9780062797988
Formato:
Audiolibro


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Tangerine

3.5
113 valutazioni / 27 Recensioni
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Recensioni della critica

  • This is a juicy novel, and that's not just a pun about its title. A cinematic debut (it's already been optioned), "Tangerine" is a Hitchcockian tale of obsession in the seductive chaos of midcentury Morocco.

    Scribd Editors
  • This is a juicy novel, and that's not just a pun about its title. A cinematic debut (it's already been optioned), "Tangerine" is a Hitchcockian tale of obsession in the seductive chaos of mid-century Morocco.

    Scribd Editors

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    Could have been a great story, but found it very repetitive and characters flimsy. I struggled to the end, but found it disappointing - perhaps it will make a better film.
  • (4/5)
    The back story and build up felt laborious, but when I got to the end it felt like it was needed to build up the tension. However, it made the book feel slow moving me to me. I also felt like certain parts needed more information - they weren't "fleshed" out enough. I found the book heartbreaking.
  • (4/5)
    Well crafted dual narrative, with the voices of the two main characters-Lucy & Alice- alternating, and a sultry, foreboding atmosphere (Tangier, Morocco, 1956) and a shift back & forth, from the present to the past. Joyce Carol Oates comment describes it perfectly: "As if Donna Tartt, Gillian Flynn, and Patricia Highsmith had collaborated on a screenplay to be filmed by Hitchcock--suspenseful and atmospheric" (back flyleaf). A twisty psychological tale that slowly unravels, revealing only a clue here or there, but as the intentions of each character become clearer, the pace quickens and we readers are hit at the end with a triumph of Machiavellian proportions for one of the two women. This is her first novel? Wow.
  • (2/5)
    As so often, (when will I ever learn?) I was lured by the plaudits strewn all over the cover of this book that promised so much. Sadly, I wonder whether those critics had read the same book as me. It wasn’t even slightly ‘unputdownable’. I just wish I had put it down immediately after picking it up in Daunt Books last week.On a side note, I was intrigued at how many of the critics quoted cited similarities to the works of Patricia Highsmith – I think there were seven mentions of her name in the encomia on the edition I read. Did all these critics identify this apparent similarity entirely independently, or was this a case of someone sticking their neck out with a reference to her, and all the others deciding that it sounded good and thinking they could join in too? Sadly, whatever the reason behind all the references to Highsmith, I should have paid more heed, as I have never enjoyed any of her books either.
  • (4/5)
    Got a very strong Daphne DuMaurier vibe from this one! The discomfort and tension build slowly throughout, with some fascinating and creepy instances of gaslighting. I enjoyed the narration switching back and forth between villain and victim, with the same scene sometimes being told from different perspectives. I was disappointed though that the ending was given away at the beginning of the book, and even without that it would have been very predictable.
  • (3/5)
    I wasn’t expecting this plot line. I thought it would just be a more generic expat story and what attracted me was its setting – Morocco. Instead it has echoes of The Talented Mr Ripley, an obsessive friendship told in alternating viewpoints. Dark and twisted, this book was a bit uneven and I wish the women were more distinguishable and the Morocco setting utilized more. Still, a decent read. .
  • (3/5)
    Set in Tangier in the 1950s, Tangerine is a thriller.
  • (4/5)
    Set in Morocco in the 1950s, Tangerine alternates between two unreliable narrators, one woman who may be losing her mind and another who is obsessed with her. This noir-ish thriller hearkens back to the writing of Patricia Highsmith and Dorothy B. Hughes. While it does exhibit some signs of being a first novel, this was a refreshing change from the twisty, unbelievable thrillers that are the trend right now. I'll be looking for future novels from Mangan.
  • (4/5)
    In the spirit of Daphne DuMarier's Rebecca and the movie Gasligtht comes this novel of obsession, deceit and suspense. Set in the 1950's, featuring two women who were roommates at Bennington College a matriculation that did not end well. The backstory:Alice is a young woman, raised in Britain and orphaned by a housefire, attends Bennington, the alma mater of her deceased American mother. Lucy is her roommate. They become quite close in an asymmetrical relationshop where Alice reveals all and Lucy reveals very little.Fast forward to the beginning of the novel, where Alice has married, moved to Tangiers and Lucy shows up on her doorstep unannounced. From there a story of suspense and intrigue unfolds.
  • (4/5)
    There are not one, but two unreliable narrators in this story set in Tangiers in the 1950's. Lucy and Alice met as freshman roommates at Bennington College and now, a year has passed since they saw each other. When Lucy arrives, uninvited at the home of Alice and her husband John, many things are set into motion. With two narrators, the story unfolds through both their eyes and the past story of what happened in Vermont is slowly revealed. Gaslighting isn't a new term, but aptly fits. It takes some close reading in the beginning to determine for certain the 'bad guy' and their motivation. Love and money are generally the root of most crimes.
  • (4/5)
    Tangerine is the wonderfully atmospheric noir by Christine Mangan set in the Moroccan city of Tangier in the 1950s. Alice and Lucy were college roommates and inseparable until Alice dating a boy strained their friendship. After an incident they no longer spoke, but after Alice moves with her husband to Tangier, Lucy shows up and tensions quickly rise to a boiling point. Tangerine is deliciously noir, with an ending that fit the novel perfectly, while also being unexpected. Tangier, hot, humid and confusing, is present in every moment set within it, the markets and Kasbah and the people. The chapters alternate between Alice and Lucy and while the book appears to be about figuring out which of the two narrators is the one telling the truth, something else, something more interesting is going on. This is Mangan's first novel, and not all of her risks pay off, but most do and the result is just a lot of fun.
  • (1/5)
    The plot is interesting but the execution is poor. This novel is haphazardly written with all-around unlikable characters. The pace is slow to the point of distraction with overly wordy inner-monologuess thrown into the midst of coversations. And never in my life have I heard the word 'frown' used with such frequency. The narrators were the only redeeming thing about this novel.
  • (1/5)
    It’s an interesting idea but badly written. The author does follow the adage to show, don’t tell.
  • (3/5)
    Moderately entertaining story. Well paced. Appealing local color. Improbable characters. Important unexplained plot devices and marvelous coincidences.
  • (2/5)
    I really didn't care for this one. I admit that I started skimming more than halfway through and didn't really care what happened. And I think the narrator on this did not enhance my enjoyment of the story. In fact, this is one of those rare times when the audio narration negatively affected my experience.
  • (5/5)
    Keeps you on your toes
    From the beginning to end- great !
  • (1/5)
    I didn't enjoy this book. I liked Nothing, a complete waste of time.
    My rating would be 0 stars.
  • (5/5)
    ‘Tangerine’ by Christine Mangan is a story full of twists and thrills at every turn, somewhat similar to ‘Gone girl’ that I thoroughly enjoyed. If there is one thing it could have done better with, it is the characterisations of the protagonists and the city that is the site of all the action, Tangier. It did largely satisfy my need for a page turner that allowed me to finish the book within a week. The Hitchcockian plot would serve well in a film format and the buzz for an upcoming movie based on the book- to be produced by George Clooney and to star Scarlett Johansson- is already gaining momentum. I do look forward to it as it would do well to follow in the footsteps of ‘Gone girl’ in that respect.
  • (2/5)
    I found myself thinking hurry up already, get to the point. The characters are shallow, the plot is contrived. The author tries to be clever by withholding information only to leave the reader disappointed when it’s finally revealed. The ending was easily predictable and quite a let down.
  • (2/5)
    Narrator was great! However, I thought the story was over the top dramatic and extremely predictable.
  • (1/5)
    Such a boring book, really... Unfortunately it's hard to find a gd book here
  • (5/5)
    CRITICS SUGGEST 5.O, READERS SAY 3.4 - WHY THE DIFFERENCE?First let’s talk about the plot. Tangerine begins in Tangiers, Morocco in 1956. There is a prologue and epilogue, both in other locales, and the outcome is not revealed until the epilogue. Two former Bennington roommates re-unite in Tangiers when uninvited Lucy shows up at Alice’s door. Husband John arrives soon after and is not pleased to see that they have a guest – their quarters are somewhat cramped and John quickly deduces that this stranger will be cramping his life style as well. John is a leach of Alice’s Aunt Maude generosity and while he works – doing what is never made clear – he apparently is unpaid. Alice is nice, but a doormat; Lucy is not nice and speaks her mind. The sun hasn’t set before sparks begin to fly, and fly, and fly. Clearly, this would have made a great black and white Bette Davis uberdrama.Lucy and Alice narrate alternating chapters. Sometimes, Alice will give her view of something Lucy has described in the preceding chapter; other times the story will just move on. Always in the background is Tangier or Tangiers or the other 4 or 5 names history has used for this amazing city with narrow passages through the Casbah, broiling sun, hot mint tea – and the occasional tangerine. So, what’s a tangerine? Someone whose home is Tangiers, a woman, not Moroccan, a user of people – it is not complimentary.There are flashbacks to Bennington days, a hint of past trouble, the incident. A growing relationship between the two woman, despite two polar opposites in background, in personalities, in almost everything. Jump back to Tangier and we begin to meet some locals. Lucy is advised to stay away from Youssef, a warning akin to telling a teenager to drive at the speed limit and never experiment with drugs. The tension continues to mount. We learn what it was that happened that night at Bennington and why one of the young women ran away. Identities become blurred. And then there is a murder.Why 1956? The story wouldn’t quite work at much later dates. Shortly after, Morocco becomes independent, crime solving becomes more sophisticated, travel advances shrink the globe. And what about that blurb on the cover suggesting what a great Hitchcock movie this would have made? I don’t agree. I loved Hitchcock. But Hitchcock used female roles as window dressing; his films were always about the hero guy. Hitchcock did not make movies about women. There is no hero guy in “Tangerine”; actually there is no heroine either.And that is why I think there is such a disparity between most reader reviews and critic reviews. After reading critics’ reviews, one might expect 5 stars from readers. But most readers, including myself, want a hero, someone they like, someone to pull for, someone to save the day or just survive. This is not that book. Nevertheless “Tangerine” is excellent – for its great story telling, for transporting the reader to an engrossing time and place, for creating two excellent characters, for great tension and plot. So I highly recommend this book though I realize it is not for all tastes. (Reviewer personal note - this is my 600th LibraryThing review)
  • (4/5)
    There’s nothing like an unreliable narrator and when there are two in the same book you still won’t perceive reality at the end. For me it was frustrating. I love nice clean clear endings. But when I think about a book long after I’ve read it puzzling over what I might have missed, this book proves to be a success with me.
  • (4/5)
    Review of Advance Reader’s E-Proof from HarperCollinsAlice Shipley, now married to John McCallister, lives in Tangier and has not spoken to Lucy Mason, her long-ago Bennington roommate, in more than a year. Estranged since an accident, Alice is stunned when Lucy unexpectedly turns up on her doorstep. However, living in Tangier has not been easy for Alice and Lucy helps her step outside and explore.But is Lucy truly the friend she claims to be, or is Alice imagining things? Things don’t seem quite right; Alice begins to wonder . . . and then John disappears.Strong characters populate this narrative of manipulation and obsession; Tangier, vivid, haunting, and exotically described, takes on the role of a character in the telling of the tale. Tension mounts with each new reveal and the slowly-unfolding backstory is unnerving in its incongruities. Told alternately by Alice and Lucy, the revealing narrative creates a growing sense of uneasiness that puts readers on the edge of their seats and keeps the pages turning in this unputdownable book.Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    "I knew her, Alice, better than she knew herself, could anticipate every action and reaction before they had ever occurred to her. I sunk to the floor, my fingers grasping the Berber carpet beneath me, my nails turning white against the pressure as I clutched at its frayed edges." Alice and her husband John have moved to Tangier soon after their marriage. Alice has a history of mental instability and she has a difficult time adjusting to Tangier and rarely leaves their apartment. Alice is troubled by several past events including the deaths of her parents and a mysterious tragedy that occurred while Alice was a student at Bennington. Lucy, Alice's former college roommate, makes a surprise visit to Tangier. Their separation over a year ago was somehow related to that mysterious tragedy.The plot of this book was quite predictable, but the book did hold my interest. My major problem was with the lack of pacing. The writing is seriously overwrought from the beginning, so there is no build up of tension. Both women are in full tilt drama queen mode throughout. I've seen this book compared to "The Talented Mister Ripley" but that's really an insult to Patricia Highsmith. This will be made into a movie, of course, but my favorite part of the book was the cover.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    What a read! Alice Shipley returns to England following a traumatic event at her Vermont college. She impulsively marries and follows her husband to Tangier. She is visited by her college roommate Lucy and that’s when the gun starts. Slowly but surely things begin to happen that make Alice question her sanity. When Alice’s aunt Maude falls under Lucy’s spell, Alice realizes all hope is lost.this is deliciously creepy and creepily delicious
  • (4/5)
    I checked out a copy of this book from the local library to read with @saltwaterreads. All opinions are my own. ☄Tangerine by Christine Mangan. ???? Alice has moved forward with her life, married, learned to survive on her own until..........one day an old college room mate shows up out of no where. Unwanted and unsettling are the least of Alice's worries once Lucy enters her life. Alice's past is full of loss and devastation and effects her whole life and lands her in a world of trouble she was so naive to not see coming. Review also posted on Instagram @borenbooks, Library Thing, Go Read, Goodreads/StacieBoren, Amazon, Twitter @jason_stacie and my blog at readsbystacie.com