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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House


Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

valutazioni:
4/5 (334 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
11 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 5, 2018
ISBN:
9781250300300
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

LibroSnapshot

Disponibile anche come...

LibroSnapshot

Nota del redattore

Media firestorm…

This inflammatory behind-the-scenes take on the Trump White House caused an uproar even before it was published. Read the book everyone — and we mean everyone — is talking about.

Descrizione

This program includes an author's note read by Michael Wolff

The first nine months of Donald Trump's term were stormy, outrageous-and absolutely mesmerizing. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself.

In this explosive audiobook, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office. Among the revelations:

  • What President Trump's staff really thinks of him
  • What inspired Trump to claim he was wire-tapped by President Obama
  • Why FBI director James Comey was really fired
  • Why chief strategist Steve Bannon and Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner couldn't be in the same room
  • Who is really directing the Trump administration's strategy in the wake of Bannon's firing
  • What the secret to communicating with Trump is
  • What the Trump administration has in common with the movie The Producers

Never before has a presidency so divided the American people. Brilliantly reported and astoundingly fresh, Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury shows listeners how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion.

Pubblicato:
Jan 5, 2018
ISBN:
9781250300300
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

LibroSnapshot


Informazioni sull'autore

Michael Wolff has received numerous awards for his work, including two National Magazine Awards. He has been a regular columnist for Vanity Fair, New York, The Hollywood Reporter, British GQ, USA Today, and The Guardian. He is the author of several books, including the bestselling Burn Rate and The Man Who Owns the News. He lives in Manhattan and has four children.

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334 valutazioni / 95 Recensioni
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Recensioni della critica

  • This inflammatory behind-the-scenes take on the Trump White House caused an uproar even before it was published and its contents have only become even more widely talked about since.

    Scribd Editors

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Hilarious! The Keystone Cops of politics. An idiot surrounded by clowns. But I am thankful to the brave men and women who work there who aren't clowns, and block his worst impulses.I present to you, the twit(ter) president.
  • (4/5)
    A ridiculous premise and characters so exaggerated as to be unbelievable. You may well say that it’s a comic fantasy and isn’t supposed to be believable but I think the best comedy has a dark side. If, say, the main character, Trump, were trimmed a bit so you could believe he was actually a member of the human race this would be a very frightening book because, after all, the US is a democracy and in theory anyone could be elected if they had the money. Nevertheless it is very funny. The stand-out moment for me was when fact-checkers from a newspaper ring a secondary character, a Neo-Nazi called Bannon, to ask him if it’s true about the blowjobs.I think we all here in the UK can thank our lucky stars that nothing so silly could ever happen to us politically.
  • (3/5)
    I guess I should start out this review by pointing out that I don't know how much of this book is history and how much of this book is historical fiction. If 20% of this book is true, then all Americans should be incredibly fearful of what may happen over the next three years. The insanity and poor behavior exhibited by Trump and various members of his administration and support group is off the charts. I can't think of anyone, based on this book, who is less qualified to be President of the United States. What's worse is that there are no adults or smart people around him. There is so much infighting for power and influence that the needs of the country have been brutally pushed aside.

    I skimmed over the last half of the book as the first half had me so disgusted and nauseated that I could no longer go on and read. Wolff may have been carrying out Steve Bannon's agenda so it's hard to know where the lies, obfuscations and exaggerations are.

    I have read histories of various presidential administrations. Trump's appears to be the most dysfunctional since George Washington. If you are a Trump supporter or a devoted Fox news watcher, you'll pass on this book – – you probably won't believe a word of it anyway.
  • (4/5)
    Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff is like being a fly on the wall in the White House. Sure, some of this info was on the news but this is more personal. This gets right in there to the people that work with the Grabber-in-Chief. What they think of him, how they work together, or not. The back stabbing, the leaking and by who about who. What the staff call the main loafer behind his back. What the orange man does with his time. It is quite interesting. There are grammar mistakes... didn't expect that. Knocked a star off for that. The rest was what I always wished, to be a fly on the wall...:)
  • (4/5)
    It would take a special kind of secluded living not to know that Donald Trump has been in the role of President of the United States of America since January 2017. He’s the media’s villain and the media’s darling, depending upon the media. Notoriety is generally more newsworthy than being a hero and so most of the Trump stories we hear in Europe are disparaging. But where does the truth lie?News media tend to have a bias. If your personal tendency is right-wing then you are likely to follow certain news sources that reinforce your world view. If you’re more left-wing then another list of media outlets will be more to your taste. Sometimes people sample the news via channels they don’t respect or believe, just to get a bit of spice thrown into the mix. Social media can broaden people’s news church but it can also narrow it. Facebook, in particular, will serve up newsfeeds from individuals’ newsfeeds and pages that are matched by algorithms to your own friends list, pages you have visited etc. The risk is that people end up preaching to the choir, or end up in the choir being preached to, and only one perspective gets presented. These days a lot of folk get their news from social media and believe what they see. The problem is this may sometimes be – yes, a phrase that is synonymous with the Trump presidency – fake news.Social media is full of fake news these days. Was that always the case? It seems I can’t remember when it wasn’t. As an author, I don’t take a strong political or idealistic stance (perhaps sometimes I should). I have a wide circle of facebook friends and this gives me a broad perspective when it comes to viewpoints, both politically and geographically. I read stuff that makes me groan, other things that make me laugh, and content that makes me think further, wondering if it’s fake. Rarely do I unfriend, unfollow or block someone on social media. Also I don’t engage in political or idealistic online conversation. (I lurk and throw in the occasional one-liner with hopefully comic effect. But I take it all in, I see human nature in the raw and absorb what I see to help fuel my writer’s imagination.) When I see something outrageous, I fact check. Almost invariably, regardless of the viewpoint, it’s either fake news, taken out of context or only partially true. In the run up to Trump’s election, and since his inauguration, fake political news has been crashing through social media like a hailstorm. It’s bewildering. As a larger-than-life character, Donald Trump is a soft target for cheap ridicule. Mocking him for his creative hairstyle or those strangely small hands is just being mean. His oratory style and tendency towards hyperbole are not what a lot of people typically expect from a POTUS, but he doesn’t claim or want to be a typical POTUS. He wants to shake things up. According to The Guardian UK newspaper, he had made 7,645 false or misleading claims since taking office, sometimes more than 100 in one day. How could this possibly be the case? Surely a Head of State has to be taken at his/her word and any untruths would be a cause for grave concern? The peculiarity of the Trump presidency is perplexing to us Europeans, over in these staid old countries where one bold-faced lie can bring down a leader or even a government. Just 12 hours ago, Trump tweeted a quote from One America News - “There’s not one shred of evidence that President Trump has done anything wrong.” How did the world become a place where the president of a huge and powerful nation feels he needs to share those words? 24 hours ago Trump tweeted Despite the most hostile and corrupt media in the history of American politics, the Trump Administration has accomplished more in its first two years than any other Administration. A quick Google search on this topic produced an interesting article from the UK’s BBC, which suggests that there were some areas where the Trump administration has exceeded the results of previous ones. However, rate of turnover amongst senior level advisors and length of government shutdown due to funding are probably not the medals he’s looking for. But hey, we know he doesn’t really believe what he himself is saying, except in the moment. He’s just trumpet blowing, like the childhood rhyme of dominance – I’m the king of the castle, and you’re the dirty rascal.So what is the truth? What’s going on? Normally I would raise my hands (in Trump fashion) and say look, America is a very different society to ours. All countries have their problems, often depending on complex historical factors. In little old Ireland, where I live as an ex-pat Brit, we have very few deaths due to firearms, there isn’t an opioid crisis and racism is more subtle than skin tone. How can we begin to understand life across the pond? Leave the USA alone. If they want Trump (and the majority of voters, by whatever rules in play, must have chosen his team) then let us just enjoy the spectacle and see what results. But then, while trying to use up a spare half hour waiting for a train in Dublin’s Heuston Station, I stumbled over a copy of Fire and Fury. I rarely read non-fiction but something made me pick it up. Perhaps reading this would make things clearer?The surprising thing about Fire and Fury was that there was nothing surprising in it, when it came to a catalogue of White House events. From stories of the Trump campaign trail, the rousing calls of the candidate at mega-rallies, the tumultuous early days of the presidency, and the myriad well-heeled individuals who made cameo White House appearances before being sacked or resigning – everything was familiar. When Wolff quoted such a person or an anonymous source as having said or done something, I knew it already. This wasn’t because I was late to the party – I had bought the paperback a year after the hardback was first released. It was because the world, through global media, had lived through all this. Wolff tells a story of a latter-day Game of Thrones, with the houses of Trump, Bannon and Priebus battling for ascendancy. GoT with a twist, because none of the main cast has any real gladiatorial experience in the Washington colosseum. White Walkers, Wildlings, the Night’s Watch, noble dynasties, Viking types, warrior queens, mean-looking lads on horses, all waving their weapons and circling each other, with one eye on the media scavengers who sniff for carrion. The chaos proves too much for some would-be warriors who leave the field after their first blood wounds. New heroes then arise, only to have their skulls ceremoniously crushed by dominant champions. The Princess summons her dragon to breathe fire upon the weakened in-house foes, but we know the dragon will eventually take his own flight. Once I finished the book, I had to google the characters’ real-life names and find out what happened in the sequel. Sure enough, the outsider victors of the Wolff story have all since succumbed to their fate, Trump blood and marriage being the only certain protection against treachery and spells.Critics have said that Wolff played with the facts on occasion. One reviewer criticised him for using the device of unreliable narrator (although I’m not sure that review really properly explained the method) but surely that’s the whole point of the story. Everyone in the organisation has a different world view, and many live in their own reality. Some (albeit not many) see themselves as following their great leader. Others endeavour to mollify his excesses. Another plays the role of guru. The big man himself just wants to be loved and plays fast and loose with any material at hand to achieve that end. This book has, however, had an unexpected effect upon me. I am no longer surprised or appalled by anything that Donald Trump says or does. If I look at his historical tweets I just say yeah, that’s him, or no, I think someone else wrote that one. Fire and Fury has numbed me to the unfiltered thoughts of the current POTUS. I find myself able to step back and wonder if what he does and says will really have any impact upon my little world. Bearing in mind that the House of Representatives shifted control to the Democrats after the recent mid-terms (which, of course, very often happens during a US presidency), Donald Trump is going to have increasing difficulty implementing his campaign promises. Until next time.
  • (4/5)
    There is probably no President of the United States who has managed to divide the people as far as Donald Trump has. When it started with his bid to the presidency he was not taken seriously by most people, probably especially by the media. And then it happened: Donald Trump won the election and was to be the 45th President of the United States. This is where Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury starts to portray and analyze Donald Trump's first nine months in office. While all of the issues regarded in the book have gotten a lot of media attention and there is not much new to be gained on that part, it is the degree of insight that sets Michael Wolff's book apart from media coverage of the Trump presidency. The book investigates Trump's relationships to the people around him with an especial focus on Stephen Bannon, his daughter Ivanka and her husband Jared Kushner. It also takes a look at the role of the media in shaping public opinion both in the run-up to the election as well as during the presidency. Almost everything Trump does and tweets is dissected by the media and treated as some sort of new climax. To my mind, this behavior has to be reconsidered because it makes people lose track of what is happening (as there are so many things being reported in quick succession) and what is actually important and true (as the sheer amount of information and misinformation becomes ever harder to handle). Yes, many of Trump's actions and statements are outrageous, but should we always give him a stage for that? I sometimes wonder whether the manner in which he does certain things (mainly quite unpresidential) is more important than the issues at hand. Having an educated discussion about the issues and outlining where the people disagree with what the president says and does instead of constantly criticizing him for how he does it and putting that in the spotlight might not sell as well, but it might actually lead somewhere.I really liked reading this book as I felt it gave me a deeper understanding - if you might actually call it that, as many things Trump did and said (still does and says) are hardly understandable to me - of the inner workings in the Trump White House. It was interesting to read about who did what for what exact purpose and about how decisions were influenced and finally made by the President. In order to give that insight, Michael Wolff relies on insider information from the White House. Quite understandably many of his sources remain unnamed as they are still part of the administration or staff in the White House. However, this is also my minor point of criticism about the book. You have to take what Michael Wolff says at face value without really being able to fact-check his statements. That is why this is, for me, a 4-star read. Note that reading Fire and Fury might become harder to follow without a certain degree of background knowledge since Wolff drops many names and refers to many organizations and institutions. A fair amount of background knowledge is thus quite advisable, I would say.
  • (4/5)
    This book is snarky and funny and entertaining, or at least it would be if it were fiction. Instead it's about the current resident of the White House and cronies. The author flavors it heavily with his own opinion, and there has been discussion about its authenticity. However, anyone who has spent much time learning anything about the current resident can easily believe most if not all of it. I certainly can. A lot of it repeats things I already know, but I did learn new details. I read this on the heels of the Mueller Report, which I thought was objective and well-organized even though so much was redacted. This is a refreshing change from that, but I do wish I could pretend it were just another horror story instead of history in the making.
  • (4/5)
    I had expected more of a hatchet job, but this was a more balanced report that held no surprises.
  • (3/5)
    "It is worth considering the possibility that this constant, daily, often more than once-a-day, pile-up of events--each one canceling out the one before--is the true aberration and novelty at the heart of the Trump presidency." I "enjoyed" this--in the way I occasionally enjoy a gossipy People magazine article. Although some facts about Trump's policies, actions, and criminal and immoral background are included, the book mostly focuses on the Machiavellian infighting among various ever-shifting factions that went on during the first several months of Trump's presidency while the author had the access that enabled him to be a fly on the wall. Reading this, it's clear that Steve Bannon was the source for many of the revelations, but it was stunning to see how many back-stabbers Trump surrounded himself with.3 stars
  • (3/5)
    Even if this controversial book was just half true, the themes of this administration are clear: An insecure man who wants to be liked by everybody and lacks the intellectual capacity for the job, warring factions between "Jarvanka" and everyone else, and administration staff who, if they haven't already jumped ship, are desperately bailing water of a listing SS Trump. To me, not so much a book about politics as it is a salacious political tell-all.
  • (3/5)
    Pulpy. You kinda feel soiled after reading it. Should've had a subtitle: "Bannon uses Michael Wolff as a ventriloquist dummy."
  • (4/5)
    Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House promises from the beginning to offer a fly-on-the-wall view of the way things work (or don't) inside the Trump Administration. Early in his account, Wolff describes the campaign as resembling Mel Brooks' The Producers (pgs. 15-16) and this characterization, coupled with the political infighting of Game of Thrones, dominates the feel of the book from then on. Steve Bannon emerges as the "protagonist" (if there is one) as much of the story revolves around his work to brand Trump's particular style of politics and turn it into a movement or his work to assert himself as the power-behind-the-power in the White House. The end result is a narrative that leaves one feeling somewhat dirty or complicit for this inside look.While Wolff's account feels true, and he had libel lawyers read the manuscript to make sure it was safe to publish, I would have liked to see the extensive notes section one expects in a book from a journalist. He only mentions early on that he either witnessed many of these events or was told them by people who are given away in his account. Some kind of documentation would have been preferable, even if it meant a lot of interviews not for attribution listed at the end. Also, for anyone who's been following the news these last few months, most of this information is already out there. Indeed, Wolff regularly quotes from CNN or New York Times headlines. Further, the news coverage of this book was so extensive that most people who read it will find exactly what they expect based on that coverage.If you are interested in politics or current events, give it a read, but save yourself the money and get it from the library.
  • (2/5)
    Fire & Fury isn't telling us anything major we don't know. Trump and his staff are a never ending shit show. Sure we get some new details that are disturbing, but not surprising. I was looking forward to this book because of the media storm and how much Trump wanted to prevent this from coming out. Then I started listening to it and saw Michael Wolff in a interview, while I do not doubt all the things in this book are capable of happening and probably did, when he was pushed to provide some kind of proof and to talk more about his process and resources, he kinda lost his cool. He should of provided better background information on himself, his resources, and when possible provide some proof and substantial facts to his claims.
  • (4/5)
    Because I have been all too absorbed in the daily happenings, the overall story of this book in terms of what happened when is something you can easily agree with. What was more interesting was the flavor Wolff provides about what people right IN there with "T" were saying and feeling at the time. Just a mind-boggling mess---I really wish it WERE just a novel. This is one of those cases where truth, or at least what is presented by Wolff, is much, MUCH stranger than fiction---sadly.
  • (1/5)
    Palace intrigue, a book utterly unconcerned with the impact of the Trump administration on anything outside the political fortunes of its members. Wolff's knob-shining for Bannon, his relentless romanticization of Bannon's "alt-right" politics, is disgusting. The last chapter in particular is Wolff brazenly campaigning for an insider position in a future Bannon presidential campaign. Trump is an abomination. Don't mistake my loathing of this book for support of Trump or his shit-for-brains, white supremacy-buttressed ideology. The corruption, mendacity, incompetence, and treasonous actions of this administration warrant deep scrutiny and documentation. Wolff just isn't the man for the job.
  • (5/5)
    When horror books become non-fiction, you get a view into Trump's personality (disorder), thinking, and inner-circle dynamics.
  • (5/5)
    Was impressed with the intellectual rigor and overall writing of Michael Wolff's book. His personal appearances on TV belied the seriousness he brought to his book. Personally intrigued by the dynamic of Murdoch vs. Ailes and how much the President craved the approval of Murdoch. As an ardent watcher of the Presidency and the daily chaos of the White House, this book shed light on the personal habits of the President that you see playing out in real time, to this day. His reliance on his nightly phone calls with a coterie of "friends" , his total obsession with all things Trump and Bannon's relationship with the President, Reince Priebus etc. all made for a very interesting read and worth the hype surrounding the release of the book. .
  • (3/5)
    As a daily consumer of politically oriented news from across the media spectrum, the much publicized 'Fire and Fury' was kind of a yawn to me. Lots of anecdotes, speculation, and commentary, but pretty light on direct quotes and what anyone would construe as true 'reporting'. The writing is very basic and the whole thing reads like a very long HuffPost article.That's not to say it's lacking in tidbits about people you hear about (or have heard about in the past, considering the turnover in the WH) a lot. Surprisingly, Steve Bannon comes across as one of the more talkative players Wolff dealt with during his time wandering the White House hallways. He's still a bad guy, but pretty funny in a way and surprisingly pithy with comments about the others surrounding Trump. If you're a Trump supporter, chances are you'll not even pick up this book. For anyone else who's interested in what's going on with the Leader of the Free World, it's an interesting diversion that'll probably give you some background about situations and people that have been in the news.
  • (5/5)
    Listened to this book on audio. Excellently revealing assessment of Trump personality (even though we all intuitively knew what he is like through his crazy behavior) and what's going on in the West Wing. Kudos to the Michael Wolff. The errors reported in the news are minute compared to the real insight of what's going in Trump White House. It's scary to realize that what seems like a nightmarish film is actually a reality. The narrator of the audio version, Holter Graham, did a superb job too.
  • (5/5)
    This book has been so hyped, so much written about it, that there are probably few surprises in it for the reader. However, there's quite a difference between spending five minutes reading the highlights and sitting down for five or six hours, immersing oneself in the horror show that is the Trump administration. In a word, Michael Wolff's book is brilliant. It's a political thriller with an absurd premise: that the President of the United States is a complete idiot who is also possibly insane, and that everyone around him knows this to be true. The first victim of the success of this book of this is its central character other than Trump, Steve Bannon who had the ambition to replace Trump as the next president. If Michael Wolff has done nothing else, he's put an end to the career of this arrogant fascist and for that deserves our full thanks. After reading this book, and the noting the reaction to its publication, I'd say the question is no longer if Trump is removed from office, but how. I'm betting on a resignation. But impeachment would do just as well. If this book makes that happen even one day sooner, that's more than most authors could ever dream of achieving. Well done, Michael Wolff, and thank you.
  • (4/5)
    No great insight into Trump's numerous failings, but still an enjoyable and somewhat frightening read. Other than the supposed quotes from those involved, much of it could have been constructed from media reports. Overall, a nice summary of the case against Trump. In keeping with a major theme of the book, the severest damage to Trump's political fortunes resulting from its publication will most likely come from Trump's intemperate and misguided response to it.
  • (3/5)
    If you're looking for all all sorts of juicy gossip when you read this book, all of the good stuff has already come out, and the balance is written in a more thoughtful manner than I had anticipated. The author constructs his sentences very oddly, sticking long parenthetical phrases in the middle of already complicated sentences, which sometimes requires the reader to go back and read again. The book could have also used much better editing - two obvious mistakes (and there were several more) were using the word "tow" when it should have been "toe" and using "rift" when it should have been "riff." Sloppiness like this annoys me. I guess it was a worthwhile read, if only to glean insight into the minds of the people surrounding our repulsive President.
  • (3/5)
    After all the commotion about this book, of course I had to download it to my tablet the minute it was available. However, most of the book chronicles what we've already read/heard about Donald Trump and his administration.. And as the book progressed it became clear that despite Wolfe's claims of interviewing hundreds of people, what this mostly is is Steve Bannon pontificating about how smart he is and how everyone else isn't.Bannon now seems to have been hoisted on his own petard since he is not only out of the White House, he has also been fired from Breitbart and his money people, the Mercers, have cut him off. Guess Donald Trump is having the last laugh - along with the Author who has made his pile on the book and appeared on every talk show known to man.
  • (3/5)
    I couldn't resist, everyone was talking about it so I had to read it. No surprises here. The book really is about a war between two factions in the WH. Javanca (Bannon's description of Ivana and Jared) vs Bannon's team (Bannon, Preibus and Spicer) with trump the piece in the middle which both camps push and pull as they please. Lots of edit errors (spellings, grammar, etc), which makes one wonder how many facts were confused too. But don't look at the details but rather the overall picture which is pretty gloomy. I was hoping the end would tell us how we got rid of them all, but unfortunately it doesn't :)
  • (5/5)
    The rule of Frederick the Great was described as "despotism tempered by incompetence", and that's the picture of the first 200 days of the Trump presidency.The book appears a fly-on-the-wall description of the events, with sometimes conflicting versions presented side-by-side with the biases attributed (e.g., the Bannon camp vs. the "Jarvanka" camp).However negative the content, the author's politics are not obvious and he seems to be simply quoting the people on the inside, which makes this book that much more disturbing and frightening.It did, however, provide some explanation for the events we saw unfold and somehow made them easier for me to comprehend. The self-serving and petty influences of the various individuals go a long way toward explaining the paradoxical events in the news.
  • (5/5)
    I'm a Trump hater, along with his staff, family, and cronies. But this book made me laugh so hard at the absolute idiocy going on at the White House, and yes, while I wanted to cry too, there were just too many totally funny moments for me not to enjoy this book. If you want to see the biggest fools who've ever lived in our country, and see what idiots they are, and read about the most narcissistic, thin skinned liar you've ever heard of while laughing the whole way through, this book is for you. Recommended for liberals, progressives, and even conservatives who are regretting voting for this idiot-child!
  • (4/5)
    For starters, the ubiquitous promotional campaign that preceded the release of ths book should be a lesson to other authors. If you're going to serve up three-quarters of all the riveting material in media interviews, be prepared for many readers to a tad disappointed as they search for uncharted territory during their 300+-page adventures. Having said that, Wolff's controversial work is a fascinating and disturbing protrait of a White House in disarray. True, some inaccuracies, inconsistencies and other issues have raised come credibility questions. But political junkies and even armchair contemporary history buffs will find this an interesting "fly-on-the-wall" perspective one of the most tumultous periods in Washington history. It raises some intriguing questions and provides insights into dozens of key players both inside and outside the White House.
  • (5/5)
    Why five stars, because I found this book fascinating in many ways. Sure, there are all those bizarre quotes and "related comments" that we all know from the news and the heavy media coverage of this bestseller, but the form of the book is a trip. The structure is somewhat chronological, somewhat by topic, but page by page it's scattershot, dancing all over the Trump White House. I kept having a strong image of the author just sitting on a couch in a well-trafficked area of the White House and the entire staff dropping themselves down and spilling their guts ... be it factual, rumor, or pure political intrigue. Oh no, this rating of five stars isn't for fine writing, but the style seems open to anything, and not held to many set rules. My mind heard so much familiar - as I am a political news junkie - but it's almost overwhelming to have it all together, page after page after page after page. Unprecedented is the best label for our political times and this jumbled, stuffed-to-the-gills work of nonfiction aptly reflects how people listening to Trump news feel themselves overloaded, and the sheer volume and speed of all that reporting causing all of us to age so quickly. Hasn't Cheetos Trump been president for at least four years yet???????
  • (5/5)
    This book represents a historic moment. It also tells a story so compelling that, once seen, cannot be unseen.Donald Trump did not intend to be president; he wanted to start a media network. No one around Trump thought he could make it to the Whitehouse (except Steve Bannon), and no one around him now these days thinks he has a chance at making it through his first term.Trump is a machine. He has the same self-control as a toddler. He wants everyone to like him, seemingly failing to realize the impossibility of such an outcome in politics. He is a pawn of those around him, and, at the same time, a whole-unpredictable force of nature. He doesn't have coherent policy views because his internal state various from minute to minute. His speeches are incoherent because he's psychologically unsound, if not outright deranged.Trump, and his administration, shot himself in the foot with the whole Russian thing: taking the meeting in the first place, firing Comey, lying about the meeting, saying they shouldn't look at the family finances. They've mis-handled the situation at every step of the way, and at this point the vortex of impeachment seems inescapable. This book might just seal the deal.Trump is in the news every day, and has been for a couple years now. This book takes the barrage and reminds of the larger arc, calling out the truly significant events between all the commotion.The book also exposed me to more of the views of actual voices of the Trump Whitehouse than I've ever taken the time to listen to before.
  • (2/5)
    Crappy, crappy, crappy editing.