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The City of Brass: A Novel

The City of Brass: A Novel

Scritto da S. A. Chakraborty

Narrato da Soneela Nankani


The City of Brass: A Novel

Scritto da S. A. Chakraborty

Narrato da Soneela Nankani

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (292 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
20 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 14, 2017
ISBN:
9780062742643
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Step into The City of Brass, the spellbinding debut from S. A. Chakraborty—an imaginative alchemy of The Golem and the Jinni, The Grace of Kings, and Uprooted, in which the future of a magical Middle Eastern kingdom rests in the hands of a clever and defiant young con artist with miraculous healing gifts.

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of eighteenth-century Cairo, she's a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles and a reliable way to survive. 

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she's forced to question all she believes. For the warrior tells her an extraordinary tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling birds of prey are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass—a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In Daevabad, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. A young prince dreams of rebellion. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say to be careful what you wish for . . .

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 14, 2017
ISBN:
9780062742643
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

S.A. CHAKRABORTY is the author of the critically acclaimed and internationally best-selling Daevabad Trilogy. Her work has been nominated for the Locus, World Fantasy, Crawford, and Astounding awards. You can find her online at www.sachakraborty.com or on Twitter @SAChakrabooks.

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4.4
292 valutazioni / 52 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    The City of Brass has an original feels as it explores the incredible world of djinn, peris, and marids through the viewpoint of Cairo-raised Nahri. Nahni has always known that she is different with her ability to sense lies and to understand and speak any language, with some healing skills besides. But when she accidentally summons a djinn, she ends up on the run with him, other fearsome beings in pursuit. They take refuge in the City of Brass, and Nahri soon find the complex world of politics and ancient grudges is no refuge at all.The worldbuilding in this book is extraordinary, the descriptions exquisite. Nahri is refreshing as a heroine since she has a definite edge; even when in the lap of luxury, she can't shake the hoarding habits she knew as a starving thief of Cairo. The pace is good, too, making this a fast read despite its 500-plus pages.I have a hard time keeping track of a multitude of names, and that made the book's various political factions a source of constant confusion for me. I just could not keep track of who was who and allied with what. The romantic angle within the book isn't heavy, which is good, because it actually left me pretty cold. I am not attracted to the bad boy types in books or reality, and Dara held zero appeal for me from the start. It's evident early on that he did some bad things in the past (a major understatement, which I won't explore in more detail due to spoilers) and the end only confirmed his alignment. In all, a good escapist read, and I can easily see why it garnered such hype with its originality and fast pace.
  • (5/5)
    A fantasy story mixing different mythology, but mainly focused on djinns. Interesting main character and good story that moves along pretty well.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! Richly detailed, nuanced, exciting!
  • (4/5)
    File under pretty damn good but not quite great. This work of adventure, social conflict and court intrigue set in an Islamic supernatural demi-monde has, as it's biggest problem, too many moments where I felt a situation was set up to be a data dump and I suspect that the more you've read about Muslim world history on your own the better off you'll be. That said, Charaborty's main character, the con woman and healer Nehri, is very cool and at the end of the book when it appears that she has been cornered, defeated by events and given an offer she can't refuse one gets the sense that the story is really just beginning. It is to be admitted that those bored with hearing about social conflict in the contemporary Muslim world will also be bored with this book as I don't doubt that current events also are at the back of this novel.
  • (3/5)
    This is the first book in the Daevabad Trilogy. I was really looking forward to reading this book and had heard many good things about it. Unfortunately, I ended up stopping it about 60% of the way through; I realized I had a ton of this book left to read and just did not care.I listened to this on audiobook and the narration was well done. If you enjoy audiobooks this is a well done one.The story goes back and forth between Nahri and Alizard. Nahri is a thief with an interesting healing talent who accidentally summons Dara, a djinn warrior. As Nahri learns about her past she ends up embarking on a journey with Dara to a magical djinn city. Alizard (Ali), is a Prince of Daevabad. Ali has recently been given a position of power in the city and is trying to reconcile his religious beliefs with his father’s political ambitions.I loved the beginning of this book. Nahri is a fun character with interesting talents but it felt like she left Cairo way too quickly. Her journeys with Dara are entertaining and introduce us to some intriguing magical races. I never really warmed up to Ali’s parts of the book; he has some very black and white views and spends most of his portion of the story trying to navigate djinn politics. The djinn were depressingly human-like in their pettiness and very little discussion about their magical talents was included in the story.Things really slowed down for me when Nahri and Dara get to Daevabad. Suddenly Nahri loses all personality and Dara is hardly in the story at all. We mostly watch the noble djinn be cruel to Nahri and watch Ali be very wishy washy as he oscillates between trying to please his father and trying to stay true to his beliefs. I suddenly realized I was avoiding listening to this book and that I still had another 7 hours to go in the story. It made me groan in dread. This book needed much better pacing. In the end I decided to stop listening to this because I was starting to dread the droning on about politics, Ali’s wishy washy indecision, and Nahri’s sudden inability to think or act for herself.Overall the beginning of this book was pretty amazing; I loved the characters, the adventure, and the world. However it went downhill quickly in the middle of the book. If you like epic fantasy with a lot of complex politics and characters who don’t act, but are rather pushed, through the plot then you may like this.
  • (4/5)
    Starts in Cairo and continues into the desert into a world of Devas and Djinn and other creatures that are part of mythology I don't get exposed to that often this is a tale of a girl who is getting by in the slums using her wits finding that she has power and then that this power has a price. It's quite complex and has a different society but still there are castes and politics and complex things going on. She may be the last with her talents and that makes her valuable, particularly to those who would exploit her.It took me a while to get into this one and then I was off. It was interesting and I'm curious about what's going to happen next.Read as part of the Hugo Award Ballot.
  • (3/5)
    This story was so much better when the main characters meet up in the palace but the first 100 pages did nothing for me reading about the journey to get to the city was a bit of a slog. Two stars for the start and four for the ending.
  • (5/5)
    So good I've read it twice in a year - and it was better the second time around. A beautifully-imagined Middle Eastern fantasy where social tensions threaten to tear apart the capital city of the djinn. I loved the characters, I loved the world-building, and I loved the way Chakraborty holds her characters to account.
  • (5/5)
    I'd been drooling over this book for months (gorgeous cover, djinn), but resisting (ginormous hardback, series) until the paperback came out and I had to finally give in. I was shocked that I had to special order it, as it seemed like a big deal getting a good push -- but maybe that's just the corner of social media that I live in.This book was really everything I wanted out of it. Not just djinn but ALL THE DJINN. A comprehensive mythos that embraces everything from Solomon's seal to wish-granting "genies" to all the different categories of djinn, marids, ifrit, etc. Plus, deserts, hidden cities, intersections of science and magic, lots and lots of prejudices that you sense will be challenged by the end.I did sometimes lose patience with Dara's drama, but with his very long and very troubled past, I suppose he's allowed to be a little moody. I'm really hoping we get a lot more story on him in the next book. I'm reserving this judgement until then.
  • (2/5)
    When I started this book I loved it, adored it, was sure it was going to end up in pride of place on my favorites shelf. The charismatic but troubled main character with mysterious abilities, the (to me) unfamiliar and therefore extra interesting setting, the hint of danger, the magic! Then, suddenly, it was politics. Pages and pages of politics. Even the bits with the main character were mostly backstory politics. I spent a few days picking the book up with fresh determination, only to catch myself skimming and put it down again. I've never loved a book so much at the start only to not finish it. Maybe I'll try again someday when I'm not so weary with real world politics, but I just can't do this book now.
  • (5/5)
    I blurbed this book - and loved it. Each page reveals a new wonder.
  • (4/5)
    Nahri is a young woman living in Cairo in the late 18th century. She is an orphan, a thief, a con artist, and a healer. She is unaware that she's not human despite the fact that she heals extremely quickly. One night after accidentally alerting an Ifrit to her existence she is attacked. As she prays for help she, once again accidentally, calls forth a Daeva, a fire elemental, that rescues her. This Davea, named Dara, recognizes her as the last of the Nahids, a family of healers. He takes her to Daevabad, their ancestral homeland, now ruled by the Geziri tribe who destroyed their families. Once in Daevabad Nahri must learn the ways of the healers while trying to find her way at court among her enemies.This is the first book in a new adult fantasy series. The second book is out in Jan. or Feb. I loved the world building, the characters and the story. I've already pre-ordered the second book.
  • (5/5)
    I think I loved it. I'm still processing a bit, and there were parts that bugged me, but overall it was excellent. I eagerly anticipate the next in the series!
  • (2/5)
    I finally gave up about 3/4 of the way through. It was difficult to keep straight the different djinn factions, and the book, oddly, slowed down when the heroine and the djinn Dara reached their destination.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic world building and eloquent prose. Just a well written and captivating debut!
  • (5/5)
    An amazing debut novel that mixes in Islamic mythology, war, magic, and more to create a tasty, moving, and exciting tale.For that is what this book is: a tale. Like any good tale, it has a plucky antagonist, conflicted main characters, and exotic locations. Swift moving, the story introduces us to Nahri, a street hustler and con woman in 18th century Cairo who accidentally summons a Djinn (genie). We learn about the world of the djinn as Nahri does, seeing what she sees and learning as she learns. A second plot brings us Ali, the idealistic second son of the king of Daevabad, the famous city of brass. Within that city are tribes of djinn and people of mixed blood. In the melting pot of Daevabad, not all tribes want to mingle and tribal and ethnic tensions are rising. Ali wants to look after the mixed bloods, who historically have been persecuted. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    WOW, I absolutely inhaled this book!! The writing was seamless. The world was devine. The middle did drag a bit but royal politics and in-depth character development can tend to lend itself to this type of dilemma. I decided not to penalise the rating too harshly because of this though I did waiver back and forth between 4 & 4.5 star...BUT seeing as how the sluggishness was coupled with some great writing... a grand and unique premise (especially for a topic so fervently explored)... a plot that had me constantly questioning everything I had presupposed along the way...I couldn't help but bump up the rating sooooo a well deserved 4.5 stars it is. Now onto the dual POVs. Imo the very distinctive POVs played perfectly off one another, a frequently attempted endeavour that many stories fail to accomplish. The backdrop seemed both masterfully crafted as well as meticulously researched creating an undeniably authentic atmosphere. The characters were breathtakingly, "humanly"flawed. Nahri, our heroine, was a little annoying at times but ultimately her loyalty and overall potential was endearing. I can definitely see camps for favored male characters being formed down the road. Who was my favorite you ask?!? Well I won't go into too much detail but I will say that though Dara seems like the perfect companion/protector, I couldn't help but root for sweet naive Ali. Speaking of camps, it's probably obvious from my previous admission BUT fair warning: there was a most salacious love triangle percolating (though very minimally acted upon) which happened to be the impetus for much of the drama SO if that's not your thing...you've been warned. I couldn't help but obsessively check Chapter and Location progress. This is usually a bad sign in my world BUT here it was for all the right reasons. I watched the pages fly by wishing to stall the inevitable and THAT hasn't happened to me in a long while....sad, I know, but true. Anyhow, ultimately many MANY questions went unanswered, leaving me with a nagging hunger for the next book, STAT. So hurry up please, I NEED answers!!!
  • (5/5)
    Day-um, that ending though. This book was a rollercoaster. I had so many emotions, I was excited, angry, laughing, smiling, sad, all of the things! In City of Brass we are introduced to Nahri - a swindler living in Cairo, who then finds out she is shafit - half human, half djinn. She learns of Daevabad, the City of Brass, and this story is her journey there and what happens once she gets there. This book was full of action, developing relationships, political intrigue and court politics, sibling rivalry, and just a bunch of mystery and backstabbing. It was great. I really enjoyed the writing, and the descriptions. The nuance of the world that was created and how much thought went into everything. Once I got into the story, I didn't want to stop reading. The plot didn't feel slow, it was paced really well. I enjoyed both POV characters - although Ali got on my nerves a lot. They had unique voices and distinctive personalities and I really enjoyed that. I loved getting to know Nahri and her motivations, and how she developed throughout the novel. There is definitely room for more development, but I think that will come in later books. Ali I felt didn't have as much development, he was very set in his beliefs, yet it still worked. We were given glimpses into his past, and from his family as to how he came to be like this, and I think that helped.I loved the world building as well! It was well done, although I felt sometimes we were left in the dark just to keep a mysterious aura around things until the author was ready to reveal it. Otherwise, it was done really well and incorporated into the story in a great fashion.Overall, I really enjoyed reading this, and it's been a while since I've been so mad and exclaiming out loud and telling my partner how the book was making me feel. I definitely recommend!
  • (5/5)
    The City of Brass comprises of two stories that come together into one. First, there's Nahri, the Cairo-based young women who's barely getting by. She's also... odd. Odd as in there's something different about her. Second, there's the story of Ali, or Alizayd, the second son of the King of the mysterious city of Daevabad.
  • (4/5)
    This is a hard one to rate, but it is definitely ambitious in vision and deserves better than average. So, 4 it is. As much as it was hyped, I really wanted to love it, but I couldn't quite.This is a highly political Games of Thrones, Middle Eastern-style, with mysticism and magic. Parts of it are lush and beautiful, like a rich tapestry. As another reviewer said somewhere, both the first and last 10-15% of the book is gorgeously and compellingly written.The middle...and the characters, well, not so much. At 500+ pages, it's over-long, even accounting for the world-building. Entire scenes could have been cut without loss to plot and would have benefitted the narrative pace.And the characters, well....the biggest issue in my opinion is that they aren't internally consistent, nor is there really anyone - or any coupling - to root for.Nahri, the main character is meant to be a strong, intelligent, confident female but is comes across more often as brash, selfish, and immature. She falls for two men who are nemeses of each other, but the author never explains with her conflicting loyalties or has her confront them and it's just sort of narrative whiplash. Plus, it's never quite clear who either of these male characters really are at their core--they're just story vessels or 'types' more than they're fully-developed with a rich backstory.Turns out, it didn't seem to matter at the end anyway.This book contains a lot of politics about different tribes, with themes of oppression, torture/slavery, evil rulers, religious extremism in the book, but none of the themes are really sorted or fully developed. It's hard to follow the threads through and examined too closely, it might fall apart. Frequently as I was reading, I'd think a new piece of information actually conflicted with something we were told earlier about the rivalries between these different peoples/beings, but I didn't care enough to go back and look.A promising debut that could evolve into an interesting movie in the right hands, but I don't know that I'd invest in the rest of the trilogy. I've already spent time visiting Daevabad--not sure a return trip is high on the list with so many other places, worlds and people awaiting me in my TBR.
  • (4/5)
    Fantasy fans need to pick this one up. Especially if you want to try a non-Western setting. We journey to the Middle East during the time of Napoleon's occupation of Egypt. Then the story takes a big turn and we are thrown into world of myths and folktales of the region. Great characters and story that heads to an explosive ending that changes everything. They only bad thing is this doesn't come out until November which means at least a year to wait for the next book.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful and unique story! Eastern mythology is really interesting! Loved it!
  • (5/5)
    Everything about this book is amazing . Definitely would recommend to any fantasy lover
  • (5/5)
    This book has remained one of my favorite books I have read this year! I love the setting of the story, the political intrigue and the characters. I can’t wait to read more from S.A. Chakraborty.
  • (4/5)
    I was hooked and will probably listen to the second book when it comes out. The society and it's rules get a little complicated sometimes, especially for an audiobook (where you can't go back to look something up you read earlier). And the author makes some rookie errors sometimes, repeating phrases or using cliches. But generally a diverting tale.
  • (5/5)
    Nice departure from the “typical” theme(s) and characters one would generally expect from this genre. Still, while the evocative mysteries and magic’s of djinn’s isn’t expressly new/or hasn’t been explored, I have to say that this was exceptionally well executed; thoroughly engaging with a very intriguing and unique storyline, lots of sub layers, fascinating world that left you feeling after waking from a dream . . Really enjoyed it - definitely left you begging for more.
  • (5/5)
    aunque al principio era algo difícil de seguir por los diferentes tipos de nombres.
    al final ha sido muy entretenido
  • (5/5)
    Can’t wait for the next part! What an amazing audiobook.
  • (5/5)
    it was just perfect, can't wait to get to the sequel
  • (5/5)
    I was not expecting to get sucked into this world! The story is so entertaining yet raw and depicts real events in a battpe between the pureblood and mixed race. The world-building provides just the roght amount of intrigue and the characters have mysterious yet interesting backstories. The revelations had my jaw dropping and I cannot wait to read the sequel!