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Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Enlightenment

Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Enlightenment

Scritto da Robert Wright

Narrato da Fred Sanders


Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Enlightenment

Scritto da Robert Wright

Narrato da Fred Sanders

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (328 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 ore
Pubblicato:
Aug 8, 2017
ISBN:
9781508235408
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

From one of America's greatest minds, a journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

Robert Wright famously explained in The Moral Animal how evolution shaped the human brain. The mind is designed to often delude us, he argued, about ourselves and about the world. And it is designed to make happiness hard to sustain.

But if we know our minds are rigged for anxiety, depression, anger, and greed, what do we do? Wright locates the answer in Buddhism, which figured out thousands of years ago what scientists are only discovering now. Buddhism holds that human suffering is a result of not seeing the world clearly—and proposes that seeing the world more clearly, through meditation, will make us better, happier people.

In Why Buddhism is True, Wright leads readers on a journey through psychology, philosophy, and a great many silent retreats to show how and why meditation can serve as the foundation for a spiritual life in a secular age. At once excitingly ambitious and wittily accessible, this is the first book to combine evolutionary psychology with cutting-edge neuroscience to defend the radical claims at the heart of Buddhist philosophy. With bracing honesty and fierce wisdom, it will persuade you not just that Buddhism is true—which is to say, a way out of our delusion—but that it can ultimately save us from ourselves, as individuals and as a species.
Pubblicato:
Aug 8, 2017
ISBN:
9781508235408
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Robert Wright, PhD, is professor of history at Trent University Durham in Oshawa, Ontario. He is the author of the national bestsellers Three Nights in Havana and The Night Canada Stood Still, both of which won the Canadian Authors Association’s Lela Common Award for Canadian History, and Our Man in Tehran, which was made into an award-winning documentary film. He lives in Toronto with his wife and children.


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4.6
328 valutazioni / 43 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    easy to follow the layman terms for anyone new to the subject. a hidden little gem
  • (4/5)
    Delightful. Even though, It´s not a very scientific neither philosophical book; Wright explores some concepts of Buddhism practice in an understandable way. The popularity of "yoga" as a comercial trend, misunderstood the spiritual benefits of real meditation practices which would lead to the true. I don´t think the aim of Wright was to present an extensive compilation of evidence, rather his own personal experiences and opinions about the matter of Buddhism as an accurate approach to life itself. I remembered took a few lecture of him in "Buddhism and Modern Psychology" in Coursera; they were really though. But now, after listened to this audiobook, many concepts seem more familiar and less intricate that they were. I listened to this book in audio format at the right time. I recommend the book to whoever wants a good relaxing time.
  • (5/5)
    Great facilitated online course on Coursera and now a brilliant book to follow. A great overview and insight into a psychologists experience and findings within practicing and researching Buddhism.
  • (5/5)
    Robert Wright is a clear thinker whose opinion carries a lot of weight with me.....this book just enhances my opinion of his work.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent book, but 4 starts rather than 5 because it can be a bit too long and winding in places so occasionally loses a bit of impact and requires some rewinding to get back into. I'll be buying a paper copy
  • (5/5)
    Excellent cohesion of science and spirituality presented beautifuly.. balanced, interesting, and quite funny.. everything required to breeze right through while learning, laughing, and loving this book!
  • (5/5)
    true, inspiring, humorous and relevant to all of us. I wish animals could read as well.
  • (5/5)
    This has been the best Science/Phylosophy/Buddhist book I have read and the closest to matching Science brain and Buddhist mind.
    And no my head did not explode, but then, I meditate therefore I am not.
  • (5/5)
    Got me thinking about all the difficult concepts of Buddhism and a totally relatable and non-Stuffy Way.
  • (5/5)
    I'm fairly well versed in the tenets of secular Buddhism but I was impressed that he could take a lot of old ideas and give them his own personal flavor. I believe this book is great for beginners but also for seasoned students. He gave voice to many of my own experiences with Buddhism and meditation. It's not a how-to book but gives a great overview of common pitfalls when one tries to meditate. He shows how distraction common among beginners isn't a failure. And how you can make the most of it even if you can't pay attention to your breath for more than 5 seconds. I could go on and on about it but I'd say just give it a try and if you like the first chapter you'll probably be into the rest of it.
  • (5/5)
    Why Buddhism is True is so beautifully and clearly written as it compares the scientific theory of natural selection with Buddhism that it makes you understand more fully its truthfulness.
    Fred Sanders reading coupled with the subject matter was perfect!
    I’m just disappointed I’ve finished the listen.
  • (5/5)
    The book poses some great comparisons with natural selection and how we are “meant” to live our life and shows how we can use the teachings of the Buddha to help break away from our day to day thinking that has evolved in our minds due to human evolution. Such a great read/listen!! Highly recommend it!! Also, especially love all the Matrix analogies...lol makes the reading more fun.
  • (3/5)
    A fascinating look at the correlation between Buddhist understanding of the psyche and modern psychology. Found it very interesting, although struggled at times with the audio as the narrator is very monotone, and at times the pauses and emphasis are distracting in the sense that they sound like an automated recording. 3 stars.
  • (5/5)
    There is a lot that we do not have to think about.
  • (5/5)
    Having listened to the lectures before, this was really enjoyable in the audio format and was good to reflect on some of the ideas whilst even on the move myself.
  • (5/5)
    This accesible and informative pairing of Buddhist doctrine with psychological findings was, in a word, enlightening. As a beginner in Buddhist philosophy I learned a great deal about how the teachings of Buddhism correspond to the realities discovered by cognitive science. Highly recommend for anyone interested in the workings of the mind
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful book. It as a great discussion of Buddhism thoughts held by an empathetic author
  • (5/5)
    As a nuance in meditation and concepts of self awareness, this book did achieve it's purpose of giving me a fair idea of how would it be to get there - self awareness and strike the emotional balance by observing the thoughts and feelings over those thoughts mindfully. Beautifully explained in relation to evolutionary psychology in the interests of Darwin's theory.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderfull work, full of informations. If you are interested in the science that can support buddhism, this book is for you.
  • (4/5)
    Accessible and lively tour of the philosophical issues. Stays secular but with enough personal anecdote to keep things interesting.
  • (3/5)
    There was a lot of information to absorb in this book and for people interested in science or evolutionary psychology, there are some fascinating ideas to ponder. However, I had different expectations for this book, based mostly on the title -- Why Buddhism is True. But really this book is about how our minds show us a distorted reality, a necessary feature for survival, and how meditation can unmask the distortion and show us the truth. I really liked the evolutionary biology part of this book. It's so interesting to see how we distort reality and why humans evolved to do this. And although I can see that there is a lot of data these days espousing the benefits of meditation, I don't know I agree that it will solve many of the problems in our world as Wright seems to preach. Also, he discounts some of the religious aspects of Buddhism, so I feel like his title is deceptive. It would be like saying why Judaism is True and then have a book that discusses the validity of one of the ten commandments.The book is accessible and entertaining, but it left me oddly unsettled.
  • (1/5)
    I'm sure for those with an interest, it was a great book (based on the Goodreads ratings). I read about 50 pages and put the book down. I guess I did not have the requisite consciousness or mental bandwidth to reach enlightenment. I zoned out quickly from the book.
  • (4/5)
    “We build stories on stories on stories, and the problem with the stories begins at their foundation. Mindfulness meditation is, among other things, a tool for examining our stories carefully, from the ground up, so that we can, if we choose, separate truth from fabrication.”“We don't have to love our enemies, but seeing them clearly is essential.”“...it would be tragic, to say the least, if, after billions of years of arduous effort on the part of organic life, effort that has gotten us to the verge of a global community of minds, we let the natural distortions in these minds blow the whole thing apart.”I grew up with a Christian background. My parents were not practicing but my paternal grandparents were very religious and I was influenced by them and went to Sunday school for many years. As I have matured and my mind has expanded, as I have read industriously and studied the world, I have gotten further and further away from organized religion and may now, be considered, right of agnostic. Although, I won't say that out loud, due to God guilt, that is still ingrained in my soul.The one religion I do admire, more and more all the time, is Buddhism. It makes sense. It fits. I doubt I'll ever become a Buddhist, but there is no problem with following it's tenets, especially meditation.I tried meditating a couple years ago. I barely got started but did recognize the benefits. After reading this book, I may try to get back into it. I really liked this book and it's approach. Wright is a smart guy and completely grounded and gives the reader much to chew on and dwell over. His narrative style is easy and conversational and his has a good sense of humor, which really helps through some of the dry spots.
  • (5/5)
    What can I say about this book. Wright does an excellent job applying the ethics of Buddhism to every day life. I myself do not define myself with a particular religion. When others who are of a specific religion question my choices I explain "At best, I would identify as a Buddhist" My choice is to live my life as a good person and helping others. It was confusing and then enlightening to hear Wright explain Buddhism using Science with Darwin etc. I recommend this to anyone looking for aide in anything from focus, calming oneself down, to finding a closer connection to God. There is a lot of information in here that I hope to use in my efforts to creating more calm in my life (we all know I need it). :)
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book that clarifies some important Buddhist doctrine and how it relates to a evopsychological understanding of the mind.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    brilliant writing, superb reading and just a complete total package for a very enlightening book.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Good book to get a sense of modern Buddhist ideas, science behind it and applications in daily lives
  • (4/5)
    An interesting look at the science of evolutionary psychology and how it seems to validate much of what Buddhism has held for the last couple of millennia. While the beginning and end of the book held my interest, much of the middle section was a tough read, mired in difficult to grasp philosophy. If you have a strong interest in philosophy, evolutionary psychology, or Buddhism, these chapters might flow more easily. All in all, a challenging and at times slow paced read, but interesting.
  • (3/5)
    I listened to this book as an audiobook and the concepts could be a bit deep to follow it did provide some very good insight into the author's interpretation and practice of Buddhism in his life. Meditation being the core of this practice he lays out how he developed and learned to key into life's essential questions. The answers aren't always crystal clear and probably are not meant to be but for many it can get them closer to true spiritual connection the many of the doctrine religions out there.
  • (5/5)

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

    For those like me - who are on the trial-and-error road of mindfulness meditation - this book is excellent. And even for those who are considering it! Even if I haven't yet fully grasped Buddhist concepts of "not-self", "emptiness" and "formlessness" (need to re-read those chapters!), it's not for lack of very patient and detailed interpretation of those ideas by the author (I truly see an experienced professor and lecturer here - he anticipates questions and is ready with an answer in a very engaging way!). It's not a textbook on mindfulness meditation, but rather an exploration of Buddhism where Robert Wright, often at the expense of self-deprecating humor, but always with a lot of research and knowledge to back his insights, goes on to explain Buddhism in (mostly) understandable terms (which is not an easy task, as he seems to be addressing a wide audience of probable, even if eager, novices) and to show how mindfulness meditation is the first step to enlightenment and to life that is much more positive all around. I liked his sober notion that "if complete and utter enlightenment will remain remote for most of us, portions of enlightenment are available" through mindfulness meditation. The idea that natural selection is at the core of our delusions was news to me, but it is so aptly introduced by the author that it makes total sense. And he also points out that mindfulness meditation, "an essentially therapeutic endeavor" can turn into much more than that, can actually change the world by making us face the reality in a calmer fashion. In the end, it's a very inspiring book. (I would be remiss if I didn't mention my gratitude to the author for finally explaining to me the idea behind the movie Matrix! Actually the book starts with it! As well as how he really made me laugh when he said that on the spectrum of all people ranked by their likelihood to easily pick up mindfulness meditation (at one end of which there is Bobby Knight and at the other the Dalai Lama or the late Mr. Rogers) he would be closer to Bobby Knight: he is that humble (!) although clearly he was a seasoned meditator by the time he was writing this book.)

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile