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The Last Telegram

The Last Telegram

Scritto da Liz Trenow

Narrato da Susan Duerden


The Last Telegram

Scritto da Liz Trenow

Narrato da Susan Duerden

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (4 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
11 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 25, 2016
ISBN:
9781515971597
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Decades ago, as Nazi planes dominated the sky, Lily Verner made a terrible choice. She's tried to forget, but now an unexpected event pulls her back to the 1940s British countryside. She finds herself remembering the brilliant colors of the silk she helped to weave at her family's mill, the relentless pressure of the worsening war, and the kind of heartbreaking loss that stops time.



In this evocative novel of love and consequences, Lily finally confronts the disastrous decision that has haunted her all these years. The Last Telegram uncovers the surprising truth about how the stories we weave about our lives are threaded with truth, guilt, and forgiveness.
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 25, 2016
ISBN:
9781515971597
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Liz worked for many years as a journalist for national and regional newspapers, and for BBC radio and television news, and is now a full time writer.

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3.5
4 valutazioni / 6 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    I bought this on my new Kindle Fire, because the cover looked attractive and the price was too tempting to resist, but the gamble didn't quite pay off. The Last Telegram is the debut novel from journalist-turned-author Liz Trenow, about a plucky young woman who takes over her family's silk weaving mill during the Second World War, and the factual bones of the story are largely based on the author's own family history. I loved learning about the production of silk, and how the manufacturers of decorative costume trimmings came to make an important contribution to the war effort by turning out silk parachutes instead, but the 'weft' of the author's research wasn't woven into the 'warp' of the fictional setting with enough care or ease. Nor did I take to Lily, the 'gutsy' heroine, or believe in her romance with Jewish refugee Stefan. I think, with a little careful editing for language and sex scenes, Liz Trenow's book would be better marketed as a Young Adult novel, because she conveys the anguish and bravery of wartime very well, but fails to create fully realised characters. Lily, who works in a man's world, stands up to bullies, falls in love and endures the tragic loss of those closest to her, would make a great role model for impressionable teens, while sneaking in a history lesson or two!
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyed the history of silk included. A story of love, loss, and regret, along with hope. I've read a lot of World War II books, but none from the perspective of a silk maker's family.
  • (4/5)
    Lily Verner, daughter of a silk miller, is grieving the recent loss of her husband and thinks back over a significant part of her life. She had learned to weave silk when her year in Switzerland was cancelled due to the threat the Nazi's were posing in Austria prior to the start of WW II. During the war she ended up running the mill, overseeing the weaving of parachute silk. At one time when faced with enormous pressure, she made a terrible choice she has lived with ever since, and in this novel she finally confronts it.

    The characters are well done, and it is fairly easy to root for Lily and those she loves. There are mysteries which are well kept, and it's not easy to see certain answers just by reading the ending (which I always do).

    One of the key elements in this story not seen in the summary is Lily's convincing her father to bring home three Jewish youths who have been allowed to leave Austria after the Nazi's conquered it. These three were employed at the mill, but as war began became persecuted for being "German" Jews, but mainly for being "German," despite the fact that they were Austrian. Stefan, in particular, becomes very close to Lily, and their budding romance becomes forbidden due to this persecution.

    I recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this authors first book. The Last Telegram takes place in the British countryside during WWII. How Lily finds love with a refugee and has to take over managing her families factory making parachutes for the war and then deal with all the loss and changes that war brings to her and her country.
  • (2/5)
    I read a review of this book that compared it to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. This book is no Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. It was a rather boring, predictable love story set in WWII in England.
  • (5/5)
    I love historical fiction that gives a different view of life in those times, to learn about the silk production was amazing, and how it to help the war effort