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I'll Take You There: A Novel

I'll Take You There: A Novel

Scritto da Wally Lamb

Narrato da George Guidall


I'll Take You There: A Novel

Scritto da Wally Lamb

Narrato da George Guidall

valutazioni:
4/5 (27 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 22, 2016
ISBN:
9780062657497
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

New York Times bestselling author Wally Lamb weaves an evocative, deeply affecting tapestry of one Baby Boomer's life-Felix Funicello, introduced in Wishin' and Hopin'-and the trio of unforgettable women who have changed it, in this radiant homage to the resiliency, strength, and power of women.

I'll Take You There centers on Felix, a film scholar who runs a Monday night movie club in what was once a vaudeville theater. One evening, while setting up a film in the projectionist booth, he's confronted by the ghost of Lois Weber, a trailblazing motion picture director from Hollywood's silent film era. Lois invites Felix to revisit-and in some cases relive-scenes from his past as they are projected onto the cinema's big screen.

In these magical movies, the medium of film becomes the lens for Felix to reflect on the women who profoundly impacted his life. There's his daughter Aliza, a Gen Y writer for New York Magazine who is trying to align her post-modern feminist beliefs with her lofty career ambitions; his sister, Frances, with whom he once shared a complicated bond of kindness and cruelty; and Verna, a fiery would-be contender for the 1951 Miss Rheingold competition, a beauty contest sponsored by a Brooklyn-based beer manufacturer that became a marketing phenomenon for two decades. At first unnerved by these ethereal apparitions, Felix comes to look forward to his encounters with Lois, who is later joined by the spirits of other celluloid muses.

Against the backdrop of a kaleidoscopic convergence of politics and pop culture, family secrets, and Hollywood iconography, Felix gains an enlightened understanding of the pressures and trials of the women closest to him, and of the feminine ideals and feminist realities that all women, of every era, must face.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 22, 2016
ISBN:
9780062657497
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Wally Lamb is the author of five New York Times bestselling novels: She’s Come Undone, I Know This Much Is True, The Hour I First Believed, Wishin’ and Hopin’, and We Are Water. His first two works of fiction, She’s Come Undone and I Know This Much Is True, were both #1 New York Times bestsellers and selections of Oprah’s Book Club. Lamb edited Couldn’t Keep It to Myself, I’ll Fly Away, and You Don’t Know Me, three volumes of essays from students in his writing workshop at York Correctional Institution, a women’s prison in Connecticut, where he has been a volunteer facilitator for two decades. He lives in Connecticut and New York.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di I'll Take You There

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27 valutazioni / 13 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    According to the blurbs on the back of the book Oates is a candidate for "Great American Novelist". I disagree. That's about all you need to know. Not quite sure how/why I finished it.
  • (5/5)
    Unashamed feminist work, with fantastic magical realism! Read read read!
  • (5/5)
    Outstanding piece of work. Wally Lamb did it again. Highly recommend!
  • (5/5)
    Lamb’s mastery of words weaves another classic tale that unravels through generations of a family that allows readers to easily identify and relate.
  • (5/5)
    Enjoyable listening! Entertaining and an interesting look into the ways in which families shape our being

  • (5/5)
    Wally Lamb is a writer who grabs the reader emotionally, taking them on a heartfelt journey in each book that he writes. I first discovered him in She's Come Undone, which I read at work. I cried so hard, people would stop by and ask me if I was OK. That's the kind of writer he is.When I began his latest novel, I'll Take You There, I got a different kind of vibe, a lighter tone. Felix Funicello, cousin of 1960's star Annette Funicello, is a divorced dad of Aliza, a young woman working as a writer for New York magazine.I loved the interplay between Aliza and her dad. Felix teases Aliza about her coarse language (an unfortunate side effect of living in NYC) and is supportive and encouraging in her career. Kat, Aliza's mom and Felix's ex-wife, is a strident feminist, and Felix and Kat still get along well even though they are divorced.Felix runs a Monday movie night club at a old theatre that used be a vaudeville theatre. He has heard talk of ghosts that inhabit the place, but hadn't seen any until one day he is accosted by the ghost of Lois Weber, who made her name as a female director of films of the silent era. Lois tells Felix that she is going to show him a film of his life, starting when he was ten years old.Felix actually enters the film and he becomes the young boy he once was. We meet his older sisters, Simone and Frances, as they are going to the theatre to see a movie. We learn about Felix's family and their relationships to each other.The story deepens midway, when Frances faces some issues that she has been unable to deal with. The entire family is affected by Frances's problems, and the children learn some secrets that threaten the family's cohesion.I grew to love I'll Take You There. I enjoyed the nostalgic look back at 1950's Brooklyn, and the history lesson of the Miss Rheingold beer competition that the Funicello children became personally involved in when their former babysitter was a finalist.Lamb tugs at the heartstrings of the reader in the latter half of the story, with a tale that brought tears to my eyes. (Damn you Wally Lamb, you did it again!) The Funicello family worms their way into your heart and you love and identify with them. (Fans of TV's wonderful new show This Is Us would love I'll Take You There. It has a similar sensibility and blend of humor and pathos.)Aliza is given the task of writing about the Miss Rheingold competition, which galls her since she was a Feminist Studies major in college. But she learns something interesting, and Lamb ends the novel with a blog post written by Aliza to her mom about the new generation of feminists that will particularly enlighten feminists of my age who may not quite recognize the feminists of today.I'll Take You There features a grown-up Felix, whom we first met as a young boy in Lamb's sweet Christmas novel Wishin' and Hopin', and while you don't have to have read that book to appreciate this one, those who have read it will enjoy it on a higher level. I highly recommend I'll Take You There, and it would make a great gift for the literary feminist on your list.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. History, feminism, pop culture, storytelling and Hollywood lore: it had it all.
  • (4/5)
    JCO introduces her readers to a fascinating woman in this novel. She is desperate to fit into almost any place that will have her; she seeks identity, companionship and a sense of belonging that has eluded her all of her life. As is often the case, our greatest strength may also be our greatest detriment. "Annelia's" intellectual pursuits and abilities lead her to seek definition through another character, Vernor, who uses and discards her just as her sorority did. I felt intense compassion for Annelia in her quest for friendship and belonging. Often the most vulnerable among us are those most victtimized: which comes first? I found the philosophical quotations and discussions that weave through this book in increasing frequency to be an integral part of the exploration of the initiation into adulthood.
  • (5/5)
    If you were politically aware in the 1960s, and especially if you were at university around that time, then this book will bring back memories. It's worth reading just for JCO's take on that situation of which she was very much a part. In fact, I reckon there's a lot of autobiography in this novel (I've just recently read her memoir written on the death of her husband, but looking back to their early relationship in the time this book is set). It's much more than of historical interest though. The un-named main character has a personal growth experience with which many readers will find empathy. JCO's perspective added significantly to my understanding of self, but could add much more to a reader who is a white female in a mixed-colour society. There's a fairly heavy philosophy orientation which is really integral with the story and enriches it a lot. JCO also makes a strong bid to rescue the semi-colon from demise, single-handedly using up the whole North American quota for one year :-) . I haven't noticed whether this is a feature of her other stories.
  • (2/5)
    A newspaper review or maybe the description on the back of this book described it a book that every college girl could relate to. Um, maybe if you're crazy? I read this right after reading Foxfire by Joyce Carol Oates, which was wonderful, and while I was able to get through the book and didn't actively dislike it, it was sorta a disappointment.
  • (4/5)
    An unflinching view of the life of an obsessive college student describing her run-in with sorority life and her compulsive love for a black philosophy graduate student. Remarkable prose. Piercing and haunting.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Before I give you my opinion of Wally Lamb's newest book, I have to admit that I have read and loved everything he has written and he is one of my favorite authors. This wasn't my favorite book by him but it's still a fantastic book. The character of Felix Funicello (who we knew as a child in Wishin' and Hopin') is now 60 years old and this book is a reflection on his life helped along by a few ghosts who provide him with movies of critical points in his childhood. He could not only view the films but he could also become part of it with the feelings that he had at the age he was viewing. Just as important as his reviewing his life is his look at feminism in the past compared to feminism today. I loved seeing how Felix's character evolved from his earlier book and seeing how the events in our past are what makes us the adult we are today. To sum it up, this is a book about aging, family and feminism told in a way that only Wally Lamb could tell it.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Here is another beautifully written story by Joyce Carol Oates. She perfectly captures the emotions and obsessions of the young protagonist, so that she is scarily easy to relate to. I see pieces of myself in "Anellia," and reading her experiences, I could empathize with her. Oates is a master in weaving stories!