Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Long Division

Long Division

Scritto da Kiese Laymon

Narrato da Sean Crisden


Long Division

Scritto da Kiese Laymon

Narrato da Sean Crisden

valutazioni:
4/5 (19 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Dec 23, 2013
ISBN:
9781452687025
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Long Division contains two interwoven stories. In the first, it's 2013: after an on-stage meltdown during a nationally televised quiz contest, fourteen-year-old Citoyen "City" Coldson becomes an overnight YouTube celebrity. The next day, he's sent to stay with his grandmother in the small coastal community of Melahatchie, where a young girl named Baize Shephard has recently disappeared.

Before leaving, City is given a strange book without an author called Long Division. He learns that one of the book's main characters is also named City Coldson—but Long Division is set in 1985. This 1985 City, along with his friend and love-object, Shalaya Crump, discovers a way to travel into the future and steals a laptop and cell phone from an orphaned teenage rapper called . . . Baize Shephard. They ultimately take these with them all the way back to 1964, to help another time-traveler they meet protect his family from the Klan.

City's two stories ultimately converge in the mysterious work shed behind his grandmother's, where he discovers the key to Baize's disappearance.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Dec 23, 2013
ISBN:
9781452687025
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, Kiese Laymon, Ottilie Schillig Professor in English and Creative Writing and the University of Mississippi, is the author of the novel Long Division, the memoir Heavy, and the essay collection How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.

Correlato a Long Division

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Long Division

4.1
19 valutazioni / 8 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    2.5 stars. There were some early chapters that I absolutely loved, and there is definitely something to this book that is new and different. But I think it required something of me that I didn't have to give. Undivided attention and devoted study, perhaps? I could give you the general outlines of the stor(y/ies), but I'm certain I would get confused in the details. Without expending more effort than I would normally put in, this stayed just a bit over my head. The characters were all interesting but I was so busy trying to keep them straight that I never developed feelings for them. I suspect this is a book that improves with a second reading, though.
  • (3/5)
    Citoyen "City" Coldson is a black teenager in Mississippi dealing with racism and the difficulties of adolescence. But he also seems to be... a character in a book he's reading? Maybe a book that he himself wrote? One that involves time travel, and other kinds of strangeness.The novel's depiction of and commentary on racism and the way it affects people is pointed and painful and often very well done. Everything else about it... Man, I don't even know. It's weird, because I'm perfectly comfortable with time travel stories, and I'm okay with magic realism, and well practiced in believing six impossible things before breakfast. But the strangeness in this book... I just never really felt like I had a handle on it, never felt like it quite made sense to me, even on its own terms. Maybe that's the book, maybe that's me, I don't know. I did notice, when I was nearly finished with it, that there was a blurb on the back comparing Laymon to Murakami, which suddenly reminded me that I felt a very similar can't-quite-find-my-footing feeling with the one Murakami novel I've read, Kafka on the Shore. Although I found that one more interesting than frustrating, in the end, and I'm not sure I feel that way about this one.Rating: This is a hard one to rate. The aspects of it that worked for me worked really well, and I want to give it credit for that, but mostly I'm left with this unsatisfied what-the-hell-did-I-just-read? feeling. Let's go with 3/5.
  • (5/5)
    This was a trip from beginning to end. I legitimately think it's an extremely strong four star book, but the fact that it's completely different from anything else I've been reading punches it out extra. It's a time travel novel (although not particularly science fiction-y, there isn't anything about how the time travel works, exactly), starting off with teenagers in 2013 post-Katrina rural Mississippi. (I think it's rural, I know nothing about Mississippi, there seemed to be a lot of woods) In addition to the time travel, you've a book-within-a-book story, featuring some of the same characters in various times. The humor was hitting me exactly right, too. I confess that, as usual, I struggled to keep up with exactly what thread was playing out in what way in what timeline, but that's definitely a problem I have often so I assume it's me. I mean, the broad strokes were clear, it's more like there were some details I know I fuzzed out a bit.It's not perfect, the tone oddly shifts around a bit and I'm not sure that was working for me, but overall, this book was hard to put down and whenever I had to, I found myself thinking about it a lot.
  • (2/5)
    I get the praise for this novel - it is awesome from a literary and cultural standpoint. The author was ambitious, and it paid off. I wanted to love this book for these reasons, but it just never grabbed me. There were some incredibly emotionally raw moments that prove the author's talent. Overall, though, it just wasn't for me, and I almost hate to say that.
  • (4/5)
    Oh what a refreshing gem this is. I love the humor, the characters, the writing is so full of life. Full full full. It gets a bit confusing with the time travel, and ends up seeming like the hand drawing a hand drawing, if I'm reading it as well as I hope I did. I feel like I missed so much though! The ending all but tells you to start the book over again, if only I had the time, but unless I start it again right away I don't think I could figure it out better than I already have. I can't really think about it without feeling my brain is broke. It's well worth the read anyway just for the writing style, even if you can't figure out this puzzle. I could probably think about this book for hours and never figure it out. I've got some questions! I can't tell if Laymon wrote the book intentionally vague or if I'm lacking some brain cells...so the book could probably be polished a bit, lose some loose ends. I especially loved the laptop dance party in 1964 but each page is filled with good stuff. I love that the characters compete in a sentence competition, as Laymon could certainly win one of those. The humor stays throughout the book, even when it gets confusing and sad. This book sure has HEART. I even had a dream that I was in the book with the characters. This reminds me of Mark Twain, Ralph Ellison, Victor LaValle and Haruki Murakami. If it wasn't for the Tournament of Books, I might not have found this one. A sad pairing in the ToB for this book to be against The Goldfinch. I feel like The Goldfinch was written a billion times before, but Long Division is the fresh beating heart of future books.... I will definitely be keeping an eye out for Laymon's writing in the future. Man, I need a drank.
  • (5/5)
    Enjoyed this book immensely and I can safely say this book has now become my favorite book of fiction. It’s intelligent, funny and like nothing I’ve ever read. Do yourself a favor and read it now!
  • (5/5)
    It's a crazy book but it really gets at truth
  • (3/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Read from February 26 to March 02, 2014 I had a difficult time wrapping my brain around this book. There were moments of "Wow, this is great" mixed with "I have no idea what just happened" combined with "That entire paragraph made zero sense, did the author forget a few sentences?" and then "Is 1964, 2013, or 1985 -- who did that happen to and when?"I've never been a huge fan of time travel. (That's probably why I am not a Doctor Who fan, I can't grasp the when.) But this book was even more confusing than just time travel, it's also a book-within-a-book with the characters having the same names in both the book and the book-within-a-book . Yeah, wrap your brain around that. If this book had JUST been the story of City and Shalaya, I think I would have liked it much more. (Basically, I just found parts of it way too confusing.)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile