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Red Mars

Red Mars


Red Mars

valutazioni:
4/5 (73 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
23 ore
Pubblicato:
Jul 16, 2008
ISBN:
9781436121200
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Red Mars is the first book in Kim Stanley Robinson's best-selling trilogy. Red Mars is praised by scientists for its detailed visions of future technology. It is also hailed by authors and critics for its vivid characters and dramatic conflicts.

For centuries, the red planet has enticed the people of Earth. Now an international group of scientists has colonized Mars. Leaving Earth forever, these 100 people have traveled nine months to reach their new home. This is the remarkable story of the world they create-and the hidden power struggles of those who want to control it.

Although it is fiction, Red Mars is based on years of research. As living spaces and greenhouses multiply, an astonishing panorama of our galactic future rises from the red dust. Through Richard Ferrone's narration, each scene is energized with the designs and dreams of the extraordinary pioneers.

Pubblicato:
Jul 16, 2008
ISBN:
9781436121200
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Kim Stanley Robinson was born in 1952. After travelling and working around the world, he settled in his beloved California. He is widely regarded as the finest science fiction writer working today, noted as much for the verisimilitude of his characters as the meticulously researched scientific basis of his work. He has won just about every major sf award there is to win and is the author of the massively successful and highly praised ‘Mars’ series.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Red Mars

4.0
73 valutazioni / 78 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    One of the best of a crop of Mars exploration novels from the early 90s.
  • (3/5)
    This book reads more like a jumble of things that happen over 40 years or so than a book plot, which I suppose is intended to read more like history, but it gets a little dull at times. I think I might have liked it better if it had be 3 or so books with more traditional rising and falling narrative arcs, but then again it might have been a lot more tiresome that all the characters were kind of awful and hyper-focused on their own narrow interests.
  • (3/5)
    Well written, but I wasn't interested in the story.
  • (4/5)
    It started well, becomes pretty tedious at times, but finished with a flourish. There were a lot pages spent on the relationships, especially the romantic aspects, that contributed to the tedium.

    This is really a story about how capitalism will devour anything it gets its hands on, regardless of the cost.
  • (3/5)
    Red Mars is the Moby Dick of interplanetary SF novels. Just as Melville's classic tells you everything there is to know about whales and the industry of whaling, Red Mars does the same with Mars and its colonization.

    It took me over 3 and half months to digest this whale of a book. I liked the story, enjoyed the complex, driven characters, found the scientific and social extrapolation utterly convincing. But it was all such a darn chore to read.

    I sampled some of the other reviews on GoodReads to try to figure out why. Some of these reviews are even more tedious than the book itself (and that's saying a lot!)

    An ambitious and intelligent novel that is, to quote some critic, "much easier to admire than enjoy."
  • (5/5)
    This should be Elon Musk's strategy guide to colonizing Mars. It's that detailed, science-based and fascinating. 
  • (5/5)
    This was a fantastic read. The characters all felt real, and each moment of pressure was vividly felt, as well as each moment of peace. It makes me excited for a day when we finally go to Mars, but also makes me wary of the various issues that will result. (I'd say I'm a green, by the way. Make Mars habitable, but don't make it Earth 2)
  • (4/5)
    I've had this Mars trilogy on my TBR pile for a while & have had the books waiting for me so it being summer, I decided to get to the first. I enjoyed following the main characters from the first 100 but I can't say that I particularly liked any of them. I enjoyed watching what motivated them especially when it came to the treaty negotiations in the final thirds of the book. The question of who and how a group is governed and managed plays throughout the book and with Earth in an ever tenuous situation, there's no way this is going to end politely or simply. In fact, things take a deadly turn before this ends and what comes next is in flux. Also, seeing new religious traditions take shape on Mars alongside those who've retained the faith and worship traditions they had when they were on Earth was interesting and well done.

    For me the book was best in the first and last thirds, the middle just felt unnecessarily ponderous and meandering. There was far too much time spent on the John/Maya/Frank ever shifting love triangle. They were,, none of them rendered so deeply as multifaceted characters to make it worth that much attention and it didn't influence or steer the real political and economic situation on Mars, so seriously, who cares? If I'm honest, I'm kinda looking forward to the next book because I won't have to be bothered with some of the main First 100. Most were as irritating as they were interesting and I'm just ready to meet some new people and see them take up the cause. The only one of the group that I wanted to see more of remained seriously remote and elusive most of this book but she finally showed up at the last page. The ending really gave me hope.

    I'll definitely read the next because it feels like it's just getting to what has most got my interest. I'm looking forward to see the next generation get into the game as their only home has ever been Mars and I hope to see more of Earth's push. The corporations gambit and the response to it have altered the entire planet so, very interesting times. Recommended for fans of colonization science fiction.
  • (3/5)
    Substance: The "facts" about Mars are outstanding in research and presentation. The "fiction" about the settlers, not so much. I found most of the characters only mildly interesting,not engaging; the endless massaging of personal relationship problems boring; and the Utopian-community politics less than compelling. OK for people that like soap-opera length sagas, but the exciting parts are few and far between, and even then are muted by the author's narrative style.Style: Sometimes confusing (starting the book with a chapter from the middle of the story didn't help), but the writing is serviceable. Obvious care was taken with the descriptions of the Martian landscape and areology, but nothing outstandingly poetic.Won't be reading the other two books of the trilogy.NOTE: History and the Bible and also The Book of Mormon demonstrate that NO group is immune to dissension and splitting. The colonists were tested for psychological compatibility and "scientific" world-view, but many admitted they cheated on the test (good thing, or the book would have been REALLY boring). Jealousy and pride (greed) triumph in the end.A better test would be to start them on a simulated but convincingly real "test" trip (cf "Ender's Game").
  • (5/5)
    This was probably the first 'hard' sci-fi book I ever read, almost 10 years ago now. It was bloody awesome then, and is even better now that I'm older and able to understand the politics and such better.

    This book opens up a very real and tangible universe, ours, and adds the colonization of Mars as a way of exploring human society and culture. Without spoilers, I can't say all that much more about how it does this, but suffice to say you'll learn about tech, about Mars, and even about us. There are love stories, tragedies, betrayal, and all the rest.
  • (4/5)
    Red Mars is a novel describing the near-future colonization of Mars; however, though Mars serves as a unique and intriguing backdrop, the story is really about people and humanity in general. We first read about the travails of the "first hundred" colonists--a group of highly-trained and highly-motivated scientists and engineers--as they deal with many of the engineering challenges that living on Mars presents. The author is very well-versed in the scientific aspects of living on Mars, and is able to point out minutia that ends up having a huge effect on the colonists. Despite the realism that this provides, the human factor really comes though, as interpersonal relationships become immediately important as many of the colonists have very different visions of the future. The book then fast-forwards through subsequent waves of settlers, and we find that our protaganists have a smaller and smaller say what the future will look like. However, the continue to serve as windows on the world as the new inhabitants of Mars deal with the age-old issues of humanity, including conservation versus development (in this case terraforming), mercantilism and the rights of the few (people on Mars) versus the rights of the many (people on Earth), religious freedom (and what it means to be religious on another planet), and corporate interests versus national interests versus what people actually want. The book (of course) ends in military conflict, which just highlights how fragile life is in a Martian environment where people have to set up complex systems just to stay alive. I enjoyed this book, but it read more like a history than a story. On one hand, it's certainly not an edge-of-your-seat page-turner, but on the other, the presentation is both fascinating and real in a way that you never doubt that this is how it would actually play out.
  • (3/5)
    I like this book, far superior to Bradbury's Martian Chronicles. I think this was the landscape used in the "John Carter" film of recent years, and close to the National Geographic map I own. Good fun, and I read the rest of them.
  • (2/5)
    I picked this up free for Kindle but didn't enjoy it. I'm not even sure if I bothered to finish reading it.
  • (5/5)
    I finished this last night in the car and I am still in awe. This book takes Mars from its formation in the solar system to our colonization and terraforming of the planet. The author takes great care to present things from diverse points of view, we see through the eyes of both a character for whom our very presence on Mars is destroying it and who wants nothing more than to be alone with the planet exactly as it is and a character whose ideas for terraforming Mars are too radical even for the UN.
  • (1/5)
    I actually didn't even finish this it was so terrible. Really boring and lame.
  • (3/5)
    Quite enjoyed reading it, but found it a bit of a long read, hard to stay focussed on it. Didn't read it all at once. Interesting ideas about what mars colonization would be like though, and interesting characters. Will go on to read the second part...
  • (5/5)
    The first volume, "Red Mars," is brilliant, masterful, and thrilling. Robinson writes convincingly on nearly every vector that a believable space colonization narrative needs to touch on: the technological, the ecological, the infrastructural, the psychological, the political. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Red Mars is an impressive piece of work. I would give it 5 stars, but it is, indeed, a tad bit too long. The book is "about" the colonization of Mars by humans who certainly are waaay ahead of science and technology than we are in 2011. The technical aspect of the story is hefty, so those who cannot deal with long arguments about terraforming or bioengineering or mining minerals might hate this book with a passion. The other hefty part is politics. The first 100 scientists who start the colonization go through a selection process and soon it becomes clear that most people had to hide their political views (among other things) to be able to make it. So soon after they take off, political factions start forming. This becomes the main drive of the story, in a way. As the colonization expands from just the first 100 to more people, the powerful force of capitalistic investment is felt and this further strains the different beliefs and factions among the Martians.

    The story is told form the point of view of a select few, who are some of the most important characters among the first 100. These characters are well-developed with distinct world views. They also represent different philosophical ideas. In the end, the main issue is if Mars is another mine to be used and abused by a crumbling Earth, or is it, should it try to be, its own, independent entity? And if it is going to be a power of its own, how should it be formed? The economic, philosophical, and biological arguments throughout the book address this and many related mini-issues.

    Ultimately, there is a sadness about the way humans go somewhere and destroy it. We have done this to Earth and we will surely follow with something else, if only we could get ourselves to that place.

    The molecular biology aspect of the technical stuff was well done. I will say that as of 2011 we do not know a way to just cause "autokilling" in any type of organism by just engineering in two genes. This is done in the book, and it can be thought as a simplified version of what actually happens. But the whole point of the already existing death mechanisms in cells is to prevent overgrowth. Cancer is not the lack of these genes, necessarily; it is the by-pass of such mechanisms. So just engineering in a cell death mechanism does not, would not, prevent an organism from taking over the whole surface of Mars, for example.
  • (1/5)

    This book is mind-numbingly boring. There's potential everywhere in the book, in the interplay between the characters, in the conservation vs terraforming, in the political wrangling, in the economics, in the national vs the big corps and in a myriad other conflict zones the author puts into his book. The exitement is drain out of them all by the prose and the miles and miles and miles of technical jargon, information dumps and repetition of previous technical jargon. The plot is also incoherent and the interplay between the characters is at best bland and at worst incomprehensible.

    Avoid unless you're on a quest to read all the hugo and nebula winners. *shiver*
  • (4/5)
    I really love the way he handles point of view, but to be honest, I don't like Frank and his point of view section bored me. I did feel like the balance was off between scientific description and culture/storyline, but I'm well aware that's subjective and based on my own personal quirks. I can't wait to read the next one.
  • (4/5)
    NOTE: "Piece is a self-contained extract from..Red Mars"Two scientists are on a mission on Mars to drop special windmills from their balloon craft to help terra-forming when they find that biological materials have added to their payload without their knowledge...But a big storm blows up threatens to blow them past rescue...
  • (3/5)
    A look into a future where we have the technology to colonise and terraform Mars. And as usual, the complications are caused by the human dynamic of how a new society is formed by the first 100 scientists sent over and the conflict between the people who want to make Mars their home and the Earth corporations who just want to profit from it.
    I don't claim to be a science expert, so I can't say how accurate or plausible the science is, but it was an enjoyable read.
    However, I must admit that I did skim some pages at the end with long descriptions of the landscape because I just wanted to find out what was going to happen next.
  • (4/5)
    A book chock full of hard science and a plot that is wonderfully complex. This is a great book and not the norm in todays market. A thinking man's book to say the least, and a must read for all SF fans who care what SF actually is about.
  • (5/5)
    Fascinating exploration on the theme of colonisation, examining the conflicting desires for terraforming versus preserving the native environment. A must-read for any Mars enthusiast.
  • (5/5)
    The opening and best of the mars trilogy.This book sets up the technology and social situations for the rest of the novel. Great characterization and a lot of scientific detail about Mars set up a wonderful series.
  • (4/5)
    A great story of colonizing Mars in the not-so-distant future. It describes the hardships the scientists went through when they were going through training in Antarctica, during the trip to Mars and when they finally get there. It also gets into the political impact colonizing Mars has on Earth. The different viewpoints of how to use the resources on Mars, whether or not to terraform Mars and the inevitable revolution that occurs as a result the many opposing views. Definitely worth reading the sequel Blue Mars - where the terraforming and revolution continues.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the trilogy a lot for the most part, but it got a little too hard-scifi for me sometimes. I'm interested in speculative geekery as much as the next person, but after about the 3rd consecutive page on Martian Geology or Martian Aquifer Management or whatever, my eyes would kinda start to glaze over. It also had a bit of the usual scifi one-dimensional Mary-Janeish characters, though not nearly as bad as in most cases. Really interesting and imaginative all-in-all though. The first book was definitely the best, and the last one was the hardest to get through, to the point where I quit on it for about a month before going back to finish it up. Glad I did though.
  • (2/5)
    wooden. I got 2/3 of the way thru, skimmed the last 10 pages and decided to toss it. So much of it was based on lengthy talk of the local rocks. And when John Boone spent months traveling from communities, I wondered why such a hi tech place didn't have rapid transport yet. It might have some interesting economic theory, but the story didn't even carry it as well as Atlas Shrugged did Rand's. Marina talking with John & Vlad: "...it should be the law that people are rewarded in proportion to their contribution to the system...There's all kinds of phantom work! Unreal values assigned to most of the jobs on Earth! The entire transnational executive class...Advertising, stock brokerage..." (p 298-9) This sounds exactly like John's role, yet we're supposed to believe this druggie (oh, but it's a legal drug) is a valued person in this tale.
  • (5/5)
    An amazing expensive novel of politics and science - I am not a big spacey science fiction person but I know this book will have a lasting impression on me and my thinking on a huge range of topics.
  • (5/5)
    If we are going to terraform Mars, the Mars Trilogy is probably the most realistic guess on how it will go. Kim Stanley Robinson seamlessly weaves hard science fiction, and a human plot. He does not forget what some of his predecessors forget: In every science fiction adventure, there are real people involved and they may do unexpected things. The one criticism is Robinson's politics are extremely obvious. Ultimately, characters fall into two maybe three modes of thinking, and it isn't hard to guess which one Robinson favors. In the real world, there would be about five hundred different modes of thinking, and it would be much less clear who was good and who was bad.