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Good as Gone

Good as Gone


Good as Gone

valutazioni:
4/5 (50 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Pubblicato:
Jul 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781522650393
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

"So gripping you might start to question your own family's past." -Entertainment Weekly

"[One] of the most anticipated summer thrillers . . . Gentry's novel isn't primarily about the version of the self that comes from a name and a family of origin; instead, it draws our attention to the self that's forged from sheer survival, and from the clarifying call to vengeance." -New York Times Book Review

Anna's daughter Julie was kidnapped from her own bedroom when she was thirteen years old, while Anna slept just downstairs, unaware that her daughter was being ripped away from her. For eight years, she has lived with the guilt and the void in her family, hoping against hope that Julie is still alive. And then one night, the doorbell rings. A young woman who appears to be Julie is finally, miraculously, home safe. Anna and the rest of the family are thrilled, but soon Anna begins to see holes in Julie's story. When she is contacted by a former detective turned private eye, she is forced to wonder if this young woman is even her daughter at all. And if she isn't Julie, what is it that she wants?

"So much about this novel is fresh and insightful and decidedly not like every other thriller . . . Good as Gone ranks as an outstanding debut, well worth reading. This is no mere Gone Girl wannabe." -Dallas Morning News

Pubblicato:
Jul 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781522650393
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

AMY GENTRY is the author of Good as Gone, a New York Times Notable Book, and Last Woman Standing. She is also a book reviewer and essayist whose work has appeared in numerous outlets, including the Chicago Tribune, Salon, the Paris Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and the Austin Chronicle. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Chicago and lives in Austin, Texas.


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50 valutazioni / 24 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    Rating at 3.5 stars, rounding down.

    I enjoyed this book; when I wasn't reading it I wished I was. However, the book fell short in the actual plot and events. I enjoyed the multiple perspectives from both Anna and Julie, however, I also felt as if they were unnecessary to unraveling the story until the very end. On that note, as far as "unraveling" the story goes, I didn't really feel like it was moving forward, or backwards. I felt like I was doing a side shuffle with Julie, and that Anna was stuck in the past.

    I think it is unfair to say that this novel was not suspenseful. For one thing, I really had no idea how it was going to end, which is great because after you read enough thrillers you tend to pick up on small details that give away the ending. Also, I definitely had to know what was going to happen next, it wasn't that heart accelerating oh my gosh what is going on type of suspense, which is what I both expected and would have preferred. All in all, I would still recommend this book to fans of mystery/thriller/suspense novels, however it probably won't be the best thriller you read all year.
  • (4/5)
    Julie was kidnapped from her house when she was 13, but the circumstances were very suspicious. She was never found, but suddenly appeared on her parents’ doorstep eight years later. Except several people don’t believe that this is the real Julie, and they have evidence.
  • (5/5)
    This novel.... where do I begin? The story mainly focuses on Anna and "Julie"; the rest of the family are still present but they take a backseat here. While there are quite a few people who have complained about that, I actually quite liked that there was a limit to how many characters I was required to focus on, especially as the story became more convoluted. And I mean convoluted in a good way... if that even makes sense. The story switches between Anna, who is going through the present-day events, and "Julie" with her many different personas, who is recounting all of the things that have happened to her in the past 8 years that she has been missing. At times, trying to keep the story straight can be a challenge, but it was still executed so well and kept me engrossed. As I kept reading, I was overwhelmed by all of the emotions. The pain that every family member felt was so strong, and I could sense it in every word, and action. Every family member may not have been represented as much in the story, but their emotions were aptly shown. Just reading about the experiences that "Julie" has gone through was heart-breaking, and I almost cried. Not only did this story deliver in the amount of unexpected twists, it also sent me on an emotional rollercoaster. At the end of the novel, I was exhausted by the journey... and was astounded by the quality of the work and the caliber of this author. All in all, this was a great novel that tugs at your heart while also playing on your sense of paranoia, as you try to piece together the truth behind Julie's identity.
  • (5/5)
    Kidnapped daughter returns, or does she...
  • (3/5)
    Rating at 3.5 stars, rounding down.

    I enjoyed this book; when I wasn't reading it I wished I was. However, the book fell short in the actual plot and events. I enjoyed the multiple perspectives from both Anna and Julie, however, I also felt as if they were unnecessary to unraveling the story until the very end. On that note, as far as "unraveling" the story goes, I didn't really feel like it was moving forward, or backwards. I felt like I was doing a side shuffle with Julie, and that Anna was stuck in the past.

    I think it is unfair to say that this novel was not suspenseful. For one thing, I really had no idea how it was going to end, which is great because after you read enough thrillers you tend to pick up on small details that give away the ending. Also, I definitely had to know what was going to happen next, it wasn't that heart accelerating oh my gosh what is going on type of suspense, which is what I both expected and would have preferred. All in all, I would still recommend this book to fans of mystery/thriller/suspense novels, however it probably won't be the best thriller you read all year.
  • (4/5)
    When Julie Whitaker, kidnapped from her home when she was only thirteen years old, seemingly returns to her family, it seems her parents and sister can finally begin to heal. But then a private detective begins to feed the flames of doubt Julie's mother, Anna, has already been feeling. If this woman isn't her daughter, who is she? And why would she be pretending to be Julie?Gentry has created a very suspenseful story. From the first chapter, when readers witness Julie's kidnapping through the eyes of her younger sister, Jane, we are given a look into a tale both tragic and twisted. While one aspect of the story moves forward, the other moves back in time, multiple perspectives upping the mystery.The one downside of these clever writing choices is that the book can occasionally get confusing. I had a hard time sometimes keeping track of what was happening and to whom. But I think this confusion was purposeful, and makes sense given what readers later learn about the characters and their lives up to that point.This is the second book in a row I have read dealing with child abduction, and one among many out there that have offered a fictionalized take on an all-too-real subject. But Gentry has created a unique story that will keep you guessing and have you unable to stop turning pages.
  • (3/5)
    Julie is kidnapped from her home, aged 13. Eight years later she turns up on her parents' doorstep and explains that she was sold into sexual slavery and was held in Mexico. Her mother, Anna, gradually becomes suspicious of "Julie's" story. I enjoyed the first half of this novel, although the chapters from the perspective of "Julie" and her various aliases/reincarnations were confusing to me as they appeared in reverse chronological order. I liked the sections where Anna and the PI who contacted her uncovered inconsistencies, but the "Julie" chapters got darker and darker and harder to read. In the end I skimmed the last third.
  • (5/5)
    Good as GoneIt's the mother of a missing child's most cherished wish: the child, returned.But what if you had doubts? What if your long-lost daughter wasn't being completely honest about the circumstances surrounding her abduction? What if you started to wonder if your daughter - your real daughter - might be dead after all? Who might the woman living with you be?Amy Gentry's astonishing debut explores exactly this scenario.What's it about?Eight years ago beautiful, innocent Julie Whitaker was kidnapped in the middle of the night from her own bedroom.Since then, her family have barely survived, hoping for her return while knowing it's nearly impossible.And then the nearly impossible happens: Julie is home. Or is she? And what did happen to her while she was gone?What's it like?Suspenseful. Chilling. Cleverly constructed.I loved this book and read it in a couple of days, sneaking pages into the smallest crevices of my days (Quick! The children are occupied hunting for worms! Read another page while reminding them (frequently) to be gentle.)There were so many directions the story could have gone in after the seeds of doubt are sown over Julie's identity, and I'm sure Amy Gentry could have made any of them into a gripping story, but I loved the backwards-chaining narrative she uses. (In terms of narrative structure, this reminded me of 'Memento' but with a female protagonist and a wider supporting cast.)As we witness Julie settling back into life with the Whitakers, we begin to learn about Gretchen's life...and Violet's...and Mercy's... These girls all have sad stories which are beautifully told; Gentry's style varies from the understated to the poetic as the mundanity of these girls' uncomfortable lives veers into significant moments, pivotal for their survival.What's to like?I loved the narrative structure, the story arc, the characterisation and the writing. So, everything, really.Anna's emotional unavailability is sufficiently well-established by her early spending splurge (what do you do when your 13 year old daughter re-emerges aged 21 after a traumatic 8 years absence during which she experienced multiple forms of abuse? Take her shopping, of course,) that her refusal to discuss the missing years seemed perfectly in keeping with her "hands-off" parenting style, though just occasionally I did want to scream "JUST TALK TO YOUR DAUGHTERS!" at her.Further thoughtsThe mother in me squirms a little when considering Anna's parenting. Could she have prevented Julie's disappearance? Was her emotional distance from her daughters part of the problem? Is Gentry placing part of the blame for Julie's kidnapping on a certain style of mothering or simply exploring the pressures society places on all women?It's no surprise to learn that Gentry has done a lot of research and spent a lot of time supporting women who have been abused. There's a raw honesty to her writing that makes each story she recounts compelling. I'm lucky enough not to have experienced any of the situations she writes about, but the unemotional brutality of them feels right.Final thoughtsThis is a perfect suspense novel; suspend your disbelief (why on earth didn't the police investigate a certain key avenue? If they had done so then, well, there would be no story, but it stretches belief that they didn't try at all) and this is a gripping, dark tale of childhood destroyed, sexuality abused and a mother's reluctant journey to find out the truth about her daughter's disappearance.Stunning. I highly recommend this.
  • (2/5)
    This book about the kidnapping of a 13-year old girl from her bedroom and her eventual return to her family (but is it really her?), was unnecessarily confusing (annoyingly so) and boring. It was only slightly redeemed by the last couple of chapters which explained all of the nonsense that went before. Maybe you shouldn't listen to me, though, because everybody else who reviewed this book seemed to like it a lot better than I did.
  • (4/5)
    Good story. Keeps you guessing. Interesting issues.
  • (4/5)
    Eight years ago, 13-year-old Julie was abducted from her home. Then, suddenly, she appears on her family's doorstep again, but it quickly becomes apparent that she's not exactly telling the truth about everything that happened to her. Or maybe about anything at all. This isn't a bad novel. It's decently written and has a good premise, and I got more into it as I went along, which is definitely better than the reverse. But it didn't really grip me quite as thoroughly as I was hoping it would somehow. I'm thinking that might partly be the cover's fault. The words "a novel of suspense" scrawled across it made me expect something, well, suspenseful. But despite a few twisty plot revelations (the biggest of which didn't come as all that much of a surprise, though some of the smaller ones did), I didn't find this story particularly suspenseful. Mostly it's just sad, but sad mainly in that detached kind of way that reading newspaper stories about terrible things happening to strangers is sad, even if I did start feeling more genuine empathy for the characters by the end.
  • (3/5)

    If you're looking for a seriously mysterious.....Well....Mystery, look no further.

    This follows the story of a kidnapped girl named Julie and her sudden return to her grief-stricken family 8 years after the fact.

    Soon things don't add up for her mother, Anna, who begins to dig deeper into her daughter's abduction and the 8 years she's been gone. Definitely a good read with good characters and stories, but the ending could have been a little better, as well as some of the character development. Overall a pretty good story.
  • (3/5)
    Julie is taken from her home at the age of 13 in the middle of the night. Jane, her sister, observes all of this from within her room. Julie gently persuades her sister, through motions, to not say anything. Jane then waits 3 hours before telling her parents about what happened.It is 8 years later and Tom & Anna get a knock on the door, there is Julie. Or is it?I wasn't really interested in whether this was Julie or not. I felt no compulsion with the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Good as Gone is about a girl who goes missing when she is 13. Her younger sister sees her taken by a man but doesn't say anything for 3 hours. Then one night, 8 years later, there's a knock on the door. Julie is home. As the story unfolds you hear what is happening with the family with Julie's return and you also hear Julie's story backwards. Is it really Julie or who is the woman claiming to be their kidnapped daughter? What really happened to Julie 8 years ago? I really enjoyed the writing in this book and thought it was created perfectly. I would recommend this book!
  • (4/5)
    Good As Gone is a suspense thriller that kept me guessing until the very end. Much in the same vein as Mary Kubica, this novel was told from switching perspectives in each chapter. Julie disappears at thirteen-years-old, when her sister witnesses a stranger kidnap Julie from their family home. She reappears on the doorstep eight years later, and as the family comes to terms with her return, there are several questions left in her wake. It's obvious she's hiding something, but could it be this really isn't their Julie come back to them?
  • (4/5)
    3.5 At the age of thirteen, Julie is believed to be kidnapped at knife point by an unknown stranger. The only witness her younger sister, Jane, hidden in a closet. Eight years later she returns with a story about being imprisoned by the leader of a drug cartel? But.... is any of this true? Anna, her mother begins to have doubts, is this really her daughter? Her husband has no doubts and welcomes back his lost daughter unreservedly.I really liked how this book was set up, kept me guessing, going one way and then another. Suspenseful, realistic I thought with the involvement of social media. Things we see weekly on the news. The stress on the family, the somewhat neglected younger daughter and her bitterness, all rang true. Still, I could not understand why the police were not more involved, didn't try to get to the bottom of Julie's story, that struck me as unrealistic. Though it was suspenseful, I did want to know what was going on and the author did good job maneuvering the reader through the various threads. Will more than likely read this authors next book.ARC from publisher.
  • (4/5)
    Started strong. Told from multiple perspectives and makes use of the unreliable narrator that's become all the rage. Unfortunate title that makes it indistinguishable from the glut of other books piggybacking on the success of Gone Girl or Girl on the Train. Or maybe that confusion was intentional.Middle, introducing more 'POVs,' is confusing and sort of unnecessary to advancing the story. The end and the whodunit reveal is disappointing...and really?? The author only bothers to develop two characters. Quick read and pageturner-lit. Ultimately forgettable.
  • (3/5)
    Amy Gentry's new novel, Good as Gone, takes inspiration from real life events. (There are many similarities to the Elizabeth Smart case)Eight years ago, thirteen year old Julie Whitaker was kidnapped from her bedroom at her parent's home. Her younger sister Jane witnesseD the crime from her hiding spot. Terrified, she didn't alert her parents for three hours. By that time, there was no trace of Julie and chances of finding her were slim..........until the day when a young woman knocks at the door. Could it really be Julie returned? Her parents are ecstatic - in the beginning. While Dad's faith that this is his daughter never wavers, Mom Anna has serious doubts. As does the reader.Gentry plays with the reader, giving the returned Julie her own voice and flashback chapters that plant the same seeds of doubt in our minds. Julie/Not Julie's life is hard to read about. I did like the present to past timeline for Julie/Not Julie's chapters. As the book progresses we get closer to the night - and the reason Julie/Not Julie was taken. The emotional upheaval of the return, the guilt, the questions, family dynamics and the mother/daughter relationships are also viewed and explored through Jane and Anna's points of view.I did find the police investigation into the return somewhat lacking. The night she returns, she is not even taken to a hospital. The question of whether it is Julie or not would seem to be easy to confirm with DNA. (Yes, that pragmatic nature of mine always asks these questions)I think the 'novel of suspense' moniker on the cover, may be a bit ambitious. I liked the book, but didn't find it overly suspenseful. Instead I saw it as a page turner - bit of mystery and a journey to the final answer - it it Julie or isn't it?
  • (4/5)
    This became confusing in parts- I think I wasn't paying close enough attention - or maybe it was the author's intention... but it was good.
  • (3/5)
    So back in the day there was a “Law and Order: Special Victims Unit” episode called “Stranger” in which a girl who disappeared a number of years prior came back to her family, but it turned out that she wasn’t actually the girl who had disappeared. She was an imposter, and it turned out that the reason the sister was so skeptical and cruel towards her was because SHE HERSELF HAD KILLED THE MISSING GIRL ALL THOSE YEARS AGO. WHAT A TWIST. God I love “SVU”. This is run of the mill nonsense on that show and I come back for it seventeen years in. This episode is based on the real life case of Nicholas Barclay, a Texas boy who disappeared at age 13 in 1994. His family was reunited with a man saying that he was Barclay years later… But it turned out he was a fraud named Frédéric Bourdin, a French man who conned many people using false identities. If I’m being honest, when I picked up the book “Good As Gone”, I half expected that to be the case (well maybe not so far as the sister doing the deed in the first place. That’s Grade A SVU malarky right there). But instead of detached and procedural methodical Benson/Stabler realness, I got a book that was actually a bit more twisty and turny, and one that attempts at genuine emotional connection along with the mystery it puts forth.It’s established right away that Julie may or may not actually be who she says she is. We see these mysterious deceptions through the eyes of Anna, the mother, and through ‘Julie’ herself. I kind of liked that the mystery itself wasn’t based on whether Julie was actually Julie, and that the mystery was whether or not Anna was going to figure it all out. And really, this book is more about the tragedy and trauma that a family has to endure when one of their children disappears, and how everyone copes should they suddenly come back. I think that a lot of the time we only hear about the family being reunited, but rarely do we hear about how hard it can be for everyone to readjust when so much has changed. “Room” certainly takes that theme on, and honestly, “Room” does it better. While it’s good that Gentry did make it clear that the damage is far reaching in this family, and that a potential reappearance isn’t going to just fix everything, I think that the problem for me is that, outside of younger sister Jane, I didn’t really connect to any of the characters in this book. Anna, while I have no doubt her actions are in step with how a person would react in her situation, was so cold and cruel to Jane and sometimes Tom, her husband, I just couldn’t quite get behind her completely. While I don’t doubt that the emotional trauma of losing a child is going to make anyone act in ways that aren’t always healthy, Anna didn’t grab at my sympathy heartstrings so much as put me completely off.‘Julie”s sections were interesting, going backwards from her ending up on the family doorstep and marching back through time, showing how she got there and the experiences she had to go through. While I know this was done to humanize her and to better understand her psyche, I found myself tempted to skim through these parts. It was a neat way to explain who she was, I will fully admit that, but since she herself didn’t do much for me I wasn’t as invested as others may be. We’re meant to have a lot of mixed feelings about her, and unfortunately it was hard to recover from deep suspicion. And like Anna, I just didn’t quite feel myself attaching to her as a character, even when I saw her going through really horrible and terrible things. Ultimately, it didn’t matter to me if she was who she said she was. The moments I liked best were between her and Jane, the younger sister who always blamed herself for letting a man walk out the door with her older sister as she hid in the closet. Jane was by far the character who intrigued me most, as she has basically been emotionally neglected by her parents because she’s the child who was left behind. Her own guilt festers and manifests in self imposed isolation, and her mother’s veiled resentment throws a wall between them that neither really can push through. It really did make me think about what it must be like for the kids who are left behind in stories like this, and how they handle it.I think that had this book had some perspective chapters from Jane I probably would have enjoyed it quite a bit more.And on top of everything, the ending (which I’ll leave a mystery for everyone so as not to spoil anything) felt so haphazardly thrown together, with a number of things tied up neatly in a number of bows, that I had a hard time swallowing it. Some things were just too conveniently explained away, and other things were not really addressed as much as I wanted them to be.“Good As Gone” has all the elements that it needs to make a great book, but the execution left a little to be desired for me. So instead of a great read, it was a fine one. I think that it’s worth your time if you like this genre, but it may leave readers as satisfied as they wish to be.
  • (4/5)
    Good as Gone by Amy Gentry is a 2016 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt publication. This novel is deeply consuming and thought provoking. At the age of thirteen, Julie is kidnapped, while her sister, Jane watches from her hiding place. Her parents, Tom and Anna, struggle for years, caught in the limbo between hope and the reality of Julie’s probable death, which Jane pulls out of the stops just trying to live up to her sister’s mythological perfect, just trying to be noticed. But, when Julie suddenly reappears, the apparent victim of sexual abuse a trafficking, the family is once more thrown into an unusual tailspin as hope once more contrast with disturbing information about Julie’s sudden return and the truth of how and why she was kidnapped. For Anna, the only way to reestablish a relationship with Julie and hopefully heal the rift with Jane someday, will be to uncover the grim truth, not matter what that might be. Once again, we have the ‘Gone Girl/Girl on a Train’ comparison from the publisher, and once again, I’m going to tell you to blow that off. This is a solid and compelling psychological thriller, very moody and atmospheric, and emotional. I was impressed by some of the unique tactics the author used to weave the complex tale of Julie’s past together, but the switches in time and directions occasionally jarred. I also guessed some of the plot twists before they were revealed, but could not have worked out all the details and so it didn’t diminish my enjoyment of the book. This is an effective and compelling read, and is a notable debut. I will definitely read more books by this author. 3.5 stars
  • (4/5)
    ‘It’s so easy to forget how terrible the world is. Tragedy reminds us. It is purifying in that way. But when it starts to fade, you have to return to the source, over and over.’When Julie Whitaker was just 13 years old, she was walked silently out of her house by knifepoint. The last person to see her alive was her 10 year old sister, Jane. Eight years have gone by and the time for hope, hope that Julie could ever be found, has long since passed. A knock on their door one night just may prove that there is always a reason to keep hoping: Julie finally found her way home. …or did she? The girl at the front door is about the same age as Julie would be and looks like how they imagine she would, but after 8 years, how do you really know? She tells stories of being held captive, of being raped, of being kept at a drug lords compound in Mexico. But something about her entire story rings false and as the story continues unfolding, more suspicions arise. If this isn’t Julie, who is it and what could she possibly gain from pretending to be someone she’s not?‘If there is something missing—if I am afraid to love her quite as much as before—it is only because the potential for love feels so big and so intense that I fear I will disappear in the expression of it, that it will blow my skin away like clouds and I will be nothing.’It’s clear that the inspiration for this story came from Elizabeth Smart’s tragic story, but Gentry’s debut novel impressively builds off inspiration and stands strong on its own merits. To me, the definition of a good mystery is one that continues to keep you riveted while also keeps you guessing. Good as Gone seems to reveal far more than it should early on, however, nothing is simple and straight forward about this mystery. Gentry throws continuous curve balls, introducing many girls all with heartbreaking stories like Julie’s. Of the experiences they endured just to survive and how those experiences altered their very being making it near impossible to remember a time before. Before their lives were irrevocably obliterated.Good as Gone was a surprising read that stood out in a sea of mediocre mysteries with an abundant amount of effectively written plot twists, keeping the reader hypothesizing. The ending felt mildly flat only because there were so many diversions, I was on the edge of my seat expecting a final one to end it on a shocker. Good as Gone is a tangled family drama with an outstanding mystery from a promising debut author.
  • (4/5)
    TEXAS MYSTERY / SUSPENSEAmy GentryGood as Gone: A Novel of SuspenseHoughton Mifflin HarcourtHardcover, 978-0-544-92095-8 (also available as an ebook, an audio book, and on Audible), 288 pgs., $23.00July 26, 2016 Anna, Tom, and Jane are sitting down to dinner one night when the doorbell rings. Anna answers the door. “The first thing I see is her pale hair,” thinks Anna, “then her face … there’s something familiar about her.” Julie Whitaker has been gone for eight years, kidnapped from her bedroom at thirteen, “and just like that, the worst unhappens. Julie is home.” As the family tries to move forward, treading lightly, fault lines are exposed. When Anna gets a phone call from a private detective, he adds fuel to her dawning suspicions, and she begins to question this Julie’s identity. Is she or isn’t she? Beginning with the exquisite tension of the prologue, Good as Gone, Austinite Amy Gentry’s debut novel, is by turns gripping, insightful, brutal, depressing, and hopeful. Gentry, a veteran of volunteer work helping victims of domestic and sexual violence, dives deep into murky psychological territory and sets up camp, empathically conveying the particular and disparate mindsets of small children, teenage girls, and grown women alike. Gentry’s portrait of contemporary American girlhood — attempting to grow up in a culture that pounds them about the head and shoulders with the message that their bodies are commodities (but don’t you dare presume the power to use it as such—this is reserved for men) — is devastating. Anna, mother, wife, and university professor, is the practical one, the analytical one, the one who must believe, for her own sanity, that Julie is dead. Tom, father, husband, accountant, is the emotional one, the one who quits his job to devote his time to search efforts: collecting and administering donated funds for such things as reward money and billboards, creating Facebook pages and attending support groups. Jane, sister and troubled college freshman, was ten years old when Julie was taken, and the only witness. Gentry does a fine job of rendering the complicated relationship between Anna and Jane, who feels she’s been grievously neglected. The fast-paced plot is carefully crafted, casually dropped hints are perfectly placed, details matter. Alternating narratives and shifting points of view demand close attention. The many startling plot twists are worthy of Gone Girl (with shades of Elizabeth Smart), the kind that confuse your brain as it struggles with learned cultural stereotypes that preclude possibilities, and then requires you to consider those possibilities. Gentry’s ingenious technique of working backward from the present, all the way back to before the beginning, to reveal how Julie became who she is now is particularly compelling. In the end, Good as Gone is part thriller, part social critique, and wholly satisfying. I read Good as Gone in a single sitting because it wasn’t possible to not.Originally published in Lone Star Literary Life.
  • (3/5)
    There seem to b a lot of "kidnapped by cult" mysteries cropping up. This was a worthy effort, though I found the interspersing of change of POV and names confusing for a good bit of the book, and almost gave up. Finished it though.