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The Forever War

The Forever War

Scritto da Joe Haldeman

Narrato da George Wilson


The Forever War

Scritto da Joe Haldeman

Narrato da George Wilson

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (213 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1999
ISBN:
9781436121170
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

When it was first published over 20 years ago, Joe Haldeman’s novel won the Hugo and Nebula awards and was chosen Best Novel in several countries. Today, it is hailed a classic of science fiction that foreshadowed many of the futuristic themes of the 1990s: bionics, sensory manipulation, and time distortion. William Mandella is a soldier in Earth’s elite brigade. As the war against the Taurans sends him from galaxy to galaxy, he learns to use protective body shells and sophisticated weapons. He adapts to the cultures and terrains of distant outposts. But with each month in space, years are passing on Earth. Where will he call home when (and if) the Forever War ends? Narrator George Wilson’s performance conveys all the imaginative technology and human drama of The Forever War. Set against a backdrop of vivid battle scenes, this absorbing work asks provocative questions about the very nature of war.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1999
ISBN:
9781436121170
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Joe Haldeman began his writing career while he was still in the army. Drafted in 1967, he fought in the Central Highlands of Vietnam as a combat engineer with the Fourth Division. He was awarded several medals, including a Purple Heart. Haldeman sold his first story in 1969 and has since written over two dozen novels and five collections of short stories and poetry. He has won the Nebula and Hugo Awards for his novels, novellas, poems, and short stories, as well as the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Locus Award, the Rhysling Award, the World Fantasy Award, and the James Tiptree, Jr. Award. His works include The Forever War, Forever Peace, Camouflage, 1968, the Worlds saga, and the Marsbound series. Haldeman recently retired after many years as an associate professor in the Department of Writing and Humanistic Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He and his wife, Gay, live in Florida, where he also paints, plays the guitar, rides his bicycle, and studies the skies with his telescope. 


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    The Forever War by Joe Haldeman and narrated by George Wilson is a good old fashion sci-fi adventure! Space travel, aliens, action, battles, social changes, military intrigue, and a hint of romance! This book has it all in written expertly! I hung on every word! I loved this book! I read this in 1975 or about then and couldn't remember all the details only parts and that I enjoyed it. I wanted to revisit this now that I am older and wiser. Also to see what social changes time has come true from the book.The narrator was terrific! Perfect for this story!
  • (5/5)
    Review from BadelyngeI've just reacquainted myself with Joe Haldeman's anti-war sci-fi classic The Forever War. First published in 1974 the book tells the story of William Mandella, one of the first conscripted troops to be trained and thrown at an alien race the expansionist human race has encountered unimaginable distances from Earth. After his first tour of duty, lasting two years, Mandella returns to Earth to a home that has advanced by a decade due to the relativistic nature of long distance space travel. The alienation and disconnection with the world he returns to echoes Haldeman's own experiences of returning home from his tours in Viet Nam. As more time passes, Mandella becomes more divorced from the human race as a whole, compounding the meaningless of conflict to preserve a race he no longer identifies with. It's all cleverly written, leading the reader to consider the nature of war and man's relation to it. He explodes the glorification of war and all its cliches one by one, bringing the act of war down to something mechanical with its human components as mere specialised cogs in the machine. The book won the Nebula, Hugo & Locus awards which is no mean feat considering the hot bed of sci-fi talent operating when The Forever War first appeared. Ridley Scott is said to be interested in bringing the book to the big screen.
  • (4/5)
    The Forever War by Joe Haldeman is one of those books that it seems like everyone is telling me I need to read and so I finally got around to it. I'm not entirely sure why it took me so long seeing as I've read and thoroughly enjoyed several of Haldeman's short stories and poetry. From what I can tell, there are actually several different versions of The Forever War available. The story was originally serialized in the Analog science fiction magazine in 1974 and was later collected as a novel in 1975, winning the 1976 Hugo, Nebula, Locus, and Ditmar awards. The first version of the novel was edited for length for some reason (the book is well under three hundred pages). In 1991 the book was republished with some of the missing content included (I believe this is the version that I read). All editions of The Forever War published after 1997 have been completely restored.William Mandella was a university physics student when he was conscripted by the United Nations Exploratory Force in the war against the Taurans. He is part of an elite group of highly educated soldiers, all with IQs of 150 or more and all in exceptional physical condition. The war last centuries but due to time dilation caused by traveling at close to the speed of light, William only experiences it as a few deplorable decades. Against all odds he repeatedly manages to survive the encounters with the Taurans and UNEF's own lethal training regimen. But while he and his fellow soldiers are off fighting in an interstellar war, human society is undergoing drastic changes. Eventually they no longer have a home where they are accepted to go back to.Apparently, The Forever War can be read as a commentary on the United States' participation in the Vietnam War, of which Haldeman was a veteran. Unfortunately I can't speak much to that--my high school history classes stalled out at the First World War. However, I can say that Haldeman has effectively conveyed the anger and despair of soldiers that are caught in a conflict that they want no part in and which everyone else is trying to ignore is happening. The Forever War is a science fiction story, but like all good science fiction it reveals just as much about current and past events as it does to future ones. And even the story was written in the 1970s, it is still relevant for the twenty-first century. But by using science fiction as a vehicle, Haldeman is able to get his point across, emphasizing certain aspects of the war experience, in a way that would otherwise have been unavailable to him.Perhaps as a result of it's serialization, parts of The Forever War feel slightly disjointed--almost as if the book is a collection of very closely related short stories rather than a single novel. (This may also have to do with the particular edition of the story I read.) However, this does not necessarily detract from the tale's overall effectiveness. One of Haldeman's strengths is that he pays attention to the little and big details that makes his world different without over-analyzing or over-explaining them. Although, he does occasionally choose to focus on things that seem relatively unimportant. Perhaps the thing I enjoyed most about The Forever War was Haldeman's exploration of time dilation and the alienation and culture shock people go through as society and technology continue to change without them. In general, I really enjoy Haldeman's science fiction and The Forever War is no exception.Experiments in Reading
  • (4/5)
    During the interstellar war with the Taurans, William Mandella climbs the ranks from private to major. While the war itself only lasts a few years from the perspective of the troops—since much of their time is spent traversing wormholes well beyond the speed of light—nearly 1,200 years passes on Earth.While on a mission early in his career, Mandella falls in love with fellow soldier Marygay Potter and the feeling is mutual. After Potter is nearly killed during their final tour, the army grants the pair a discharge on Earth. However, Mandella and Potter soon discover that retirement is not an option. Only one job opportunity is made available to them—return to the war.In their next campaign, both Mandella and Potter each lose a limb and are sent to a world known as Heaven to regenerate. Mandella is then promoted to Major and Potter to Captain—but each are assigned to separate companies. After saying their final goodbyes, Mandella takes command of a Strike Force headed to Sade-138, while Potter was assigned to fight the Taurans elsewhere. Mandella fears that they will never see each other again. In order to qualify for command, Mandella must undergo a deep-sleep learning process during which his mind is filled with facts and theories from Earth’s military history. What’s more, Mandella finds himself in command of a platoon comprised completely of homosexuals. Heterosexuals, while tolerated in human society today, are now considered queer. ForeverWar is a satisfying hard-SF novel that presents a unique and often candid view of futuristic military life and the possible drastic changes that might occur in Earth’s culture given 1,200 years. While the Taurans are treated lightly and never developed as anything more than an alien menace, Haldeman does an admirable job detailing the battle scenes and showing how the enemy improves their tactics and weaponry with each successive confrontation. Most of all, it was Mandella’s experiences with his fellow soldiers, his struggles with changing times (especially on Earth), and his ability to adapt and survive that kept me intrigued.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not generally a huge SF fan, but The Forever War was hugely interesting. Haldeman's military background was evident, but that added to the book rather than detracted it. Furthermore, Haldeman can actually write. I was impressed by how he wrapped everything up as neatly as he did--and it wasn't a completely tragic ending, either! His characters evolve and are sympathetic to the reader, and though it took me a great deal longer than I anticipated to get through this book I'm so glad I read it.
  • (3/5)
    A satire in he Vietnam war, unlike he accolades that are evident on reading the introduction to this, I do feel that this has aged. I have every sympathy for those soldiers that served but I wonder if this mechanism of reflection is the right one. I don't see the Taurans as particularly believe able, nor threatening and this becomes more an escapade abo how time travels in different relative speeds in space and the social isolation that can come about as a result of this.
  • (4/5)
    The FOrever war is a classic scifi novel written in 1974 which details a thousand year space war between humans and a new species. It covers the ups and downs, romance and commentry on sexuality - the disillusionment at returning from war to a society the soldiers feel like they don't belong in. Being written by an ex-vietnam soldier you do wonder how much is fiction and how much is the writers own experience returning from war.Overall, it's a compelling work, if you weren't aware it was written in the 1970s it would be hard to pick what year its from as its as current today as it was then.
  • (4/5)
    The first time I read this book it had a profound affect on me. I was not alone as it was highly acclaimed and won awards.Rereading it, twenty five years later, I am slightly less enthusiastic but still enjoyed it as a great SF book. I will be reading more books by this author.
  • (5/5)
    A great scifi book.
  • (4/5)
    published 1974, a science fiction of interstellar war with the Taurens, winner of the Nebula Award, Hugo and Locus. It is also on the npr-100 best SF. The main character is a physics student. He has been sent to war because the smartest are being sent. He does not want to be a soldier. The author wrote this in 1974 probably based on his own Vietnam experience. I was a young adult during this time and I think that the book really does reflect that war. The people going to war, not wanting to go, no one really knowing why they are fighting and when they get a chance to leave the war, they no longer fit in the world because everything has changed so much. As with many SF books, I was impressed how the author writing in the seventies pictures the world in the 21st Century and beyond. The author not only captured the feeling of going to war for a young person, fighting far from home and not fitting in the world anymore without being preachy, he also captures some of the changing aspects of the current culture. I give this book 4 stars. Quite a bit of sexual content. Some compare this book to Heinlein's Starship Troopers but besides being
  • (4/5)
    Very good military sci-fi. Well written, but violent and fatalistic, so if you don't like that sort of thing, stay away. It felt like the writer understood war (and sure enough, he is a Vietnam vet). The cover has a number of very flattering quotes from well known writers. I think I might have liked it even more if they had not raised my expectations so high - but then again, the quotes were what got me interested in the first place.

    Update August 2016. I forgot I read this book checked it out again and started reading. Something seemed fishy but it took me awhile to figure out what had happened. Anyway, it was still pretty good the second time through. There was a little bit of weirdness about gender orientation but it did not bother me too much.
  • (5/5)
    This hard-scifi interstellar was written in the midst of a country immersed in the Vietnam War. It won the Hugo and Nebula awards in 1976. This is at least the 2nd or 3rd time I've read this book. This time on audio.The story centers on the United Nations Exploratory Force, the military arm of a united world as humanity pushes out into space. As they expand, they run into an unseen alien race and are forced into conflict. Mech-suits and lasers and nova bombs, typical fare. But then its not so typical, its not all about technology, they find as battles across the far flung universe progresses, its necessary to resort to ancient medieval weapons. War is war, but the interesting thing in this story is how Haldeman handles actually getting to war. They discover "collapsars" (effectively wormholes) that allow for near lightspeed travel capabilities. But its not as warping in Star Trek or hyperspace in Star Wars. There are consequences to the extreme distances. The first battle expedition takes 2 years of subjective time to the troops, but by the time they get back home, over 25 years has elapsed. As they go out on new campaigns the distances and time dilation's get larger, the extrapolations that Haldeman explores on how the culture and economy and peoples of Earth change during the intervening 10s and 100s of years between battles is what I find very interesting.One of my favorite books, highly recommend.10/10S: 7/9/17 - 7/22/17 (14 Days)
  • (2/5)
    The Meh War.
  • (5/5)
    Haldeman's "Forever War" is often compared with Heinlein's "Starship Troopers" but I think the similarity is superficial and both stand in their own right.

    In "Forever War" the characters have a very jaded and weary look on life, military service and the war they are involved in, something probably influenced by Haldeman's own experiences in Vietnam.

    I find Haldeman a little hit-and-miss sometimes, but overall "Forever War" is one of his best. Good characterization, good central theme and uses the consequences of time-dilation to great effect.
  • (4/5)
    Follows a soldier in a future war from private through major, a career that spans centuries due to all the stargate-jumping. A cool take on the idiocy of war (without at all being preachy) and the culture shock of living through so many social changes. Slightly dated, but still a good read.
  • (4/5)
    When Vietnam vet Joe Haldeman wrote The Forever War in 1974, the U.S. had been involved in a conflict in Southeast Asia for approximately 14 years. The Vietnam War would not end until the next year. I'm sure that Haldeman's experiences influences his writing. The novel's protagonist is William Mandella, a highly intelligent physics students who is drafted in 1997 into an elite troop of similarly skilled recruits to fight the Taurans, an alien race who was discovered when they suddenly attacked several ships transporting interplanetary colonists. The motivation behind this heinous act is unknown since humans are unable to communicate with the Taurans. The initial military campaign last two years but since wormholes are used to travel at speeds nearing light speed, relativistic effects occur; he returns to an Earth 20 years in the future. Finding the return to civilian life difficult, especially since jobs are issued by the government only to those in financial need (Mandella has been accumulating a salary for the twenty Earth years that he has been gone), he re-enlists as an officer. Haldeman's novel is a science fiction award-winning classic written with a touch of humor about an extended war fought with no clear purpose. If one is a long-term science fiction fan or new to science fiction, you must read this classic.
  • (5/5)
    The Forever War, for me, lived up to its reputation. I had been wanted to read this book for at least a couple of years. An excellent use of time-dilation to represent the way that a war leaves soldiers disconnected from the civilian population (especially the Vietnam War). Would highly recommend this as an excellent example of the way that science fiction can mirror society.
  • (3/5)
    I loved the concept of relative time portrayed throughout , but at some point the book turned into a homophobic diatribe and I couldn't tell if it was coming from the main character or the author. Since the main character is based on the author, I'm not sure what to think.The ending was also too quick and simplistic.
  • (4/5)
    The sound quality was great, and it was a space opera
  • (5/5)
    This is the first time I got through an audiobook in its entirety. Generally, they put me to sleep but the quality of the story plus the style of the narrator made this an enjoyable read. On to more books narrated by George Wilson
  • (5/5)
    Wow. I picked this up pretty much at random and it was surprisingly good. Too good. Why hadn’t I knew about this one.
  • (3/5)
    First half was quite engaging but later chapters were not available! I listened through chapter 15 when it abruptly ended. Tried deleting and re-downloading -also streaming but was not able to hear the rest of the book. Just my device?I hope so. Maybe you'll have better luck than me.
  • (5/5)
    I liked it! Could have had a little better descriptions of the aliens and the future but it was good
  • (5/5)
    I was discussing this book yesterday with a co-worker who had taken a writing course with Haldeman (I was envious!). I'm cautiously giving this a 5 star review because I haven't read it since it first came out in the 1970s ... but I remember what a hammer-blow the book was for many sf readers then (me included), and how much I loved it: it's flat-out, unsentimental, brutal ... and there are things in it I remember vividly to this day.
  • (3/5)
    Great concepts, big ideas. A star off for the fact that I didn't care about any character except the protagonist, and another star off for the abrupt and unsatisfying ending. It could have been slowed down and told more closely, since it was such a big moment and all. Also, all the gays choose to be straight? Really? Ugh.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Really imaginative. Looking forward to reading his other books!
  • (5/5)
    Imaginative work on an epic time scale say through the eyes of, I suspect an actual war veteran. Engaging, challenging, and although fantastic in the true sense of the word, always an authentic representation of war. I don’t like war genres, but I really like this book because it focused on the human story.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! To think this book was written in the 70’s! The description was wonderful; I could practically “see” the story. Not sure how anyone could make physics sound interesting. I’m going to reread just to make sure I didn’t miss anything. The ending was a great closure with a twist.
  • (3/5)
    This was so-so, in that it flowed well enough but wasn't at any point revelationary for me. I felt that everything interesting in this novel is available in stories I can better appreciate. Reading FOREVER WAR didn't result in the emotional impact of Heinlein's STARSHIP TROOPERS, OSC's THE WORTHING SAGA, or any decent Romance novel. Ben Bova and Hal Clement wrote more engaging scientific conflicts in every one of their stories I've read. Well after reading, I struggle to tell this book apart from John Scalzi's OLD MAN'S WAR, as I might've picked out some of the more memorable parts of Scalzi's WAR to fill in the most boring parts of Haldeman's WAR (inadvertedly bumping up my rating here).What I remember most clearly is the limited ways gender/sex and sexuality were handled, as if everyone is highly sexual and on a binary. Entire worlds are segregated based on sexual orientation: either heterosexual or homosexual. That makes no sense. In evolutuinary terms, same-sex partners are beneficial for predominantly heterosexual family groups, not only to limit reproduction but to enforce a support structure. Sure, that wasn't common knowledge at the time Haldeman wrote his book, but it's an awkward omission today. And what about gay people who want to raise children? More apparent and more horrifying in the worlds Haldeman described is what sexual and gender minorities would likely face on being on the wrong planet. We think growing up closeted in a small city is tough. Imagine if the entire world believes your existence is wrong! The ending left me with a bad feeling toward the main characters, who I felt were off to start a colony as bigoted as any in an OSC series.
  • (3/5)

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    I'd expected better as this book is regarded as a classic, but I found it boring. War is hell, I already know that and don't need to be told over and over again.The female characters were very cardboard (well, so were the men to be fair). I kept wondering when the women would realise they had been mentally conditioned to want sex all the time so as to keep the guys happy, but the writer seemed to miss that one. (It would have been very plausible in the context of the novel.

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