Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
A History of Loneliness

A History of Loneliness

Scritto da John Boyne

Narrato da Gerard Doyle


A History of Loneliness

Scritto da John Boyne

Narrato da Gerard Doyle

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (19 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
12 ore
Pubblicato:
Feb 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781501220296
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The riveting narrative of an honorable Irish priest who finds the church collapsing around him at a pivotal moment in its history.

Propelled into the priesthood by a family tragedy, Odran Yates is full of hope and ambition. When he arrives at Clonliffe Seminary in the 1970s, it is a time in Ireland when priests are highly respected, and Odran believes that he is pledging his life to "the good."

Forty years later, Odran's devotion is caught in revelations that shatter the Irish people's faith in the Catholic Church. He sees his friends stand trial, colleagues jailed, the lives of young parishioners destroyed, and he grows wary of venturing out in public for fear of disapproving stares and insults. At one point, he is even arrested when he takes the hand of a young boy and leads him out of a department store while looking for the boy's mother.

But when a family event opens wounds from his past, he is forced to confront the demons that have raged within the church and to recognize his own complicity in their propagation, within both the institution and his own family.

A novel as intimate as it is universal, A History of Loneliness is about the stories we tell ourselves to make peace with our lives. It confirms John Boyne as one of the most searching storytellers of his generation.

Pubblicato:
Feb 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781501220296
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

John Boyne is the author of Crippen, The Thief of Time, Next of Kin, and the New York Times and internationally bestselling The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Boyne won two Irish Book Awards (the People’s Choice and the Children’s) for The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, which was made into a Miramax feature film, and his novels have been translated into more than thirty languages. Ireland's Sunday Business Post named him one of the forty people under forty in Ireland "likely to be the movers and shakers who will define the country's culture, politics, style and economics in 2005 and beyond." Crippen was nominated for the Sunday Independent Hughes & Hughes Irish Novel of the Year Award. He lives with his partner in Dublin.

Correlato a A History of Loneliness

Audiolibri correlati
Articoli correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di A History of Loneliness

4.5
19 valutazioni / 15 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Stretching 40 years, a priest recalls his vocation in Ireland as the sex abuse coverup begins. In the story e tells what it does to him,an innocent, to his vocation, and to his extended family. Very powerful!
  • (5/5)
    A History of Loneliness: A Novel is by the great Irish contemporary writer, John Boyne. It is a timely work of fiction because it is about the priesthood and Church in Ireland with a particular emphasis on sexual abuse of children. Apparently this has been a big issue of which I have been totally unaware. Boyne's writing is superb and the story is compelling if somewhat predictable. I can't remember a writer who can tell a story with the ease and fluidity of Boyne. I urge you to read this book which I have rated with five stars.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant and sad.
  • (5/5)
    What I love about John Boyne's novels is that each one is so different to the last. Having read several, I know that I will not only enjoy his writing but also will be challenged by it, and A History of Loneliness is probably his most challenging work to date. Father Odran Yates is a priest in the Catholic church in Ireland. When he joined the church in the 1970s priests were revered figures, but by the 2000s things had changed quite drastically following the scandal surrounding child abuse.Each chapter is told by Odran about a different year in his life and they jump around a lot. This isn't confusing and in fact it really helps the development of the story. It's a moving book and one which I found quite sad in places. Odran is a good man but unfortunately it's easy to be tainted by the actions of others. It's certainly a thought-provoking book and I also liked the way that real-life events, such as the death of Pope John Paul, who had been Pope for only 33 days, were drawn into the story. A very clever and completely compelling read.
  • (5/5)
    The audio for this was terrific and, for me, essential! I'm not sure I would have appreciated this nearly as much, or even finished it, if I had tried to read it. The voice of Father Odran Yates is wonderfully spoken by Gerard Doyle. Peeling back just some of the layers of the Catholic church to find what has gone on for far too long produces a vast and compelling questioning of what happens to some, or to all?---of those heading into the priesthood---different forms of loneliness that are expressed in ways that hurt so many. The self-discovery by Odran is slow but painful only when he finally recognizes himself for what has happened to him.
  • (5/5)
    this was a fabulous book about a terrible subject , child abuse by Catholic priests and how Father Odran Yates tried to do his job properly and naively, superbly written , highly recommended .
  • (5/5)
    A powerful book. It made me think about how I would have handled what happened. Would I have looked away or would I have spoken up? I liked how the story was woven between years. I figured out what happened early on to Ordan as well as Aidan. I was surprised that Ordan did not make the connection. Ordan has much that he had to live with as he aged. I wonder what happened to him. Well done.
  • (5/5)
    In his first "Irish" novel, John Boyne takes on the abuses in the Catholic Church in Ireland during the 1970s & 1980s. Told from the standpoint of Odran Yates, an Irish priest, and moving back and forth across his life, we learn no one is blameless. A fascinating story, rather like a train wreck that you can't take your eyes off, Boyne looks at all sides of this difficult story and, as in most of his books, leaves you stunned at the end. Excellent book.
  • (5/5)
    The History of Loneliness by John Boyne was an interesting book to be reading right now. Boyne is best known for The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, and like that novel, this one is told from the point of view of an “innocent” on the side of the guilty. The History of Loneliness is the story of an Irish priest who is watching the Catholic Church crumble in light of what appears to be systemic sex abuse of children by his counterparts.

    Full review at: http://www.literatureandleisure.com/2018/09/book-review-a-history-of-loneliness/
  • (5/5)
    Second book I’ve read by John Boyne and I’m very impressed by his writing and story telling skills. The story is about two priests, one who is a pedophile and the other a seemingly honest and good chaplan. The author goes back and forth in Odan’s life weaving his life with the life of his friend Tom. What was happening in the church in the late 2000’s regarding child abuse was fascinating to read because we read about how the church was dealing with the accusations of child abuse. Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    This is the 2nd book that I have read by John Boyne. This book looks at the life of Father Odran Yates from the 60's up through 2013. The main focus is the Catholic Church and the ultimate problems with priest abuses that have been well documented. You see how the church forces many unsuited young men into the Church and refuses to acknowledge their human sexual needs which unfortunately manifest themselves in taking a terrible toll on huge numbers of families. Although most of the accusations against the Church go towards the denial and complicity of the leadership, this novel shows how Yates never could accept what was happening in his Church. His own lack of compassion and failure to realize his unsuitability of the priesthood contribute to his complicity. My one complaint about the book was that it took a long time to bring out all of the issues with the problem priests. The last 100 pages moved very quickly and led to a reasonable conclusion. The book shows the impact on families and how priests went from the high to low in public perception. A strong indictment of the Catholic Church.
  • (4/5)
    The appalling cover-up of child sexual abuse by the Catholic church is told through the story of Dubliner Odran Yates who enters a seminary in the 1970's at the age of 17. During the following five years, Odran's best friend is 'cellmate' Tom Cardle who has been forced into the seminary by his abusive father. Later, Tom will be moved from parish to parish by the church - does Odran really not guess why or is he just willfully ignorant? When a tiny proportion of the paedophiles are brought to trial at last, those who kept quiet are vilified by the population. Boyne's book spans the years 1964 to 2013, and it wasn't until page 348 that I found something of Odran's behaviour to like. The book is a powerful and disturbing story of a cult that had taken over the whole country of Ireland [and much of the world], to the point where a woman with a child, an old man, and a heavily pregnant woman on a crowded train were in competition with each another about giving up their seat to the 'father'! A story that had to be told, and will need to be told over and over again.
  • (5/5)
    Odran Yates is a Catholic priest in Ireland. He entered the seminary as a youth, has endured the bad times of pedophile priests, and lives with the diminished stature he and his colleagues bear. The story follows Odran throughout his career. It offers some Vatican intrigue, church politics, and insight into the result of the unnatural celibacy practiced by most priests. The corrosive effects of the widespread scandals are on almost every page. Odran’s own inaction ultimately and dramatically haunts him.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    The events unfolding over the last five years concerning sexual abuse has seen the emergence of a bitter and enraged public calling for justice to be seen to be done and to be done with immediate effect. What has made this all the more shocking is the naming of celebrities who were to many of us cherished and household names, and whose downfall was all the more dramatic. It is impossible to believe that the signs of such abuse were not present or noticed at an earlier time, the fact is it was always there and out of fear or misguided loyalties was simply ignored. In this mishmash of deceit and lies the church (and in particular the catholic church) presented itself as the face of salvation and hope when in reality it's clergy were some of the greatest perpetratorsOrdan Yates is a priest and had always wanted to be a priest since he received "the calling" at an early age. He accepts the ceremony, the conformity, the celibacy and dedicates his life to a greater being knowing whatever the pain, whatever the trial it is god's will. We travel with him back and forth from days of his youth, his intern at college, his administering to the holy pontiff during his time in Rome. We learn of the tragedy in his life; the death of his younger brother Cathal at the hands of his father William, and the demise of his beloved sister Hannah cruelly stricken with dementia from a relatively early age. He accepts with fortitude his vocation basking in the knowledge that he has the love of his young nephews Janus (now a successful author) and young Aidan. He has always been close with this childhood friend Tom Cardie but has pondered and wondered why it is that he is constantly on the move from parish to parish.I was aware that A History of Loneliness concerned the sexual abuse of young boys when under the guardianship of those they always felt they could trust, the priests and elders of the church. John Boyne does a wonderful job of telling a difficult story and gradually introducing doubt into the mind of the reader. This must be akin to the reality of what actually occurred, the refusal to confront those in power and the inability to accept what the eyes saw but the mind did not question. In this respect and indeed in this story no one is blameless for that moment of hesitation, that moment of questioning what you refused to believe resulted in the destroyed and decimated lives of many young people. Father Yates was to make one such mistake that had devastating and far reaching consequences.This is a wonderful story, told with such depth of feeling and a true understanding of the subject matter being explored. I cannot say how glad I was that I read, even though at times the outcome was heart breaking. Boyne successfully portrays the catholic church as an institution more concerned with its own reputation and place in the community rather than protecting the vulnerable and young, the very people who looked to God as love and his workers the priests his guardians. Highly Recommended.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    Father Odran Yates narrates John Boynes’ scathing condemnation of the Catholic Church’s cover-up of sexual abuse of children by its Irish priests. As the novel progresses, Yates’ reliability as a narrator becomes increasingly suspect. The reader comes to realize that he is unsuited for the priesthood long before he does. His flaws emanate from a passive and self-centered nature combined with unwillingness to see the crimes being committed by his peers. Odran is uncomfortable with the messiness of human emotions and thus embraces the church as a way to escape engaging with the world. He elects to spend his career sequestered in a school where his first love is to organize its library rather than to council his students. He eschews assignment in the community as a parish priest but ultimately succumbs to the Bishop’s authority. Boyne develops Odran’s deeply passive nature by showing him readily accepting his mother’s belief that he has a calling to the priesthood; by his easy acceptance of church authority; and by the strangely passive way he deals with his own sexuality while a young seminarian in Rome. It is interesting to note that the new Pope’s way of dealing with that issue foreshadows how the hierarchy will contend with its abuse problem—Odran is moved from his esteemed position but not really punished.His passive nature combines with an inability to see events in their larger context, but instead only by how they affect him. The narrative builds on this by showing how the Irish people perceive the priesthood. This evolves from one of reverence to one of fear and loathing. Today they assume that all priests are pedophiles or sexual deviants. Odran goes from being a Father who must insist on not being fed by strangers on a train, to being arrested for attempting to help a young boy find his mother in a store. Also, he must wait for a parent to chaperone before he can meet with his altar boys. Through all of this, Odran shows little compassion for the victims even when it hits close to him. Instead he sees these changes in his priestly esteem as an insult to him personally and sub-consciously copes by turning a blind eye to the crimes. Boyne’s use of the word “loneliness” in his title seems not to reflect Odran’s willful blindness—“aloneness” may be a less elegant but more accurate term. In the end, Odran comes to realize that refusing to look does not equate with innocence. Boyne uses Father Tom Cardle to represent the abusive priest. Like Odran, his friend Cardle was ill suited for the priesthood, but unlike him, he knows it. Cardle’s openness about his sexuality presents severe problems for himself and the Church hierarchy. Despite this, Odran willfully refuses to see Tom’s behavior, a decision that has some severe consequences for him personally.Unfortunately, this is not an unbiased portrayal of the Catholic Church, but instead focuses on its flaws. Young boys are recruited to the Irish priesthood often against their will; the requirement for celibacy denies priests their human sexuality; the hierarchy adopts tactics of denial and cover-up while holding the people accountable with outdated rules against things like divorce and women’s freedom of choice. This remarkable novel is often frustrating to read because of Odran’s lack of self-awareness. If Father Yates doesn’t see abuse, then he will remain innocent and can go on with his comfortable cloistered lifestyle. Boyne elects to tell the story with frequent shifts in timeframe, but he executes these seamlessly and the story moves along briskly.