Scopri milioni di ebook, audiolibri, riviste e altro ancora

Solo $11.99/mese al termine del periodo di prova. Cancella quando vuoi.

Desperation

Desperation

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Stephen King


Desperation

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Stephen King

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (2.525 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
21 ore
Pubblicato:
2 feb 2016
ISBN:
9781508218289
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come e-bookE-book

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come e-bookE-book

Descrizione

"The terror is relentless" (Publishers Weekly) in Stephen King's #1 national bestseller about a little mining town, Desperation, that many will enter on their way to somewhere else. But getting out is not easy as it would seem…

Located off a desolate stretch of Interstate 50, Desperation, Nevada, has few connections with the rest of the world. It is a place, though, where the seams between worlds are thin. And it is a place where several travelers are abducted by Collie Entragian, the maniacal police officer of Desperation. Entragian uses various ploys for the abductions, from an arrest for drug possession to "rescuing" a family from a nonexistent gunman. There's something very wrong here, all right, and Entragian is only the surface of it.

The secrets embedded in Desperation's landscape, and the evil that infects the town like some viral hot zone, are both awesome and terrifying. But as one of the travelers, young David Carver, seems to know-though it scares him nearly to death to realize it-so are the forces summoned to combat them. "Stephen King's knack for turning the stray junk of pop culture into sick, darkly engrossing thrills has rarely been this much in evidence as in Desperation" (Salon).
Pubblicato:
2 feb 2016
ISBN:
9781508218289
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come e-bookE-book

Informazioni sull'autore

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


Correlato a Desperation

Audiolibri correlati

Articoli correlati


Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Desperation

3.3
2525 valutazioni / 69 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Mr. King prides himself on not being a writer who plots his books. He counts some of the books he has approached with an outline or predetermined structure as among his least favorite projects (Insomnia is an example - which I take exception with, because I really like Insomnia).Desperation is ultimately what I think is a good example of how that free-flowing, go-where-it-takes-you style can flop. A good opening - cartoonish, but intentionally so - fast pace, some promise of brutality, very foreign to his typical New England digs. In opening chapters, the hills literally and figuratively have eyes (throughout, as well - but the direct references dwindled as the book moved on) - something I think set the stage for a drama comparable to The Hills Have Eyes. Senseless, ugly, "What are you going to do about it?" brutality that strikes at fragile family members and lovers alike.It moved on to become a story about whether God is love, or cruelty. The Christian God, of course - this is mainstream pop-culture American writing, don't you know? When you say God in the US, you best not mean any of the hundreds of gods it is okay to be atheistic towards, and instead be referring to John 3:16 fanatical sign-waving-in-a-stadium God. An SK book is no place to pay lip service to diversity, at the end of the day. Mostly white, nearly always straight folks - the ones who don't shy away from shopping their local Rite Aid for books to read on the beach.I didn't hate it. I've come out the other end of some of SK's books hating them for their poor endings and untied loose ends - this ties up fairly neatly. I don't think SK liked it all that much, about 4/5ths of the way through he gives this description of a writer who feels too old to care about what he's offering his publishers:"He was getting on, and if he wanted to take himself a little less seriously, surely he had that right. There was no need to shoulder each book like a backpack filled with rocks and then sprint uphill with it. That might be okay for the kids, the bootcamp recruits, but those days were behind him now. And it was sort of a relief that they were."I can't read that and not think of it as other than self-referential. I'm grateful that he changed his tune after his brush with death in '99, though - some really mature writing has come since this book - seemingly from the mind of a man who realized that he couldn't really retire if he wanted too. He needs to do this - and if you are going to do it, you should give a better effort than what Desperation is made of.Little cursed statues, demons in rotting dead flesh, supernatural communication, faux religious significance, stormy backdrop (the crux of other books he's written before and after - Duma Key, Pet Semetary, The Shining, The Stand, on and on). Most of his staples are here. Gunslingers are here (with more than one DT reference). It is a decent read for people who already like SK a lot. Not a great example of his work, though, at the end of the day.A saving grace could be its relationship to The Regulators, a 'mirror-book' released by his long-known/embraced pseudonym and released simultaneously. I haven't read it yet, though - so I can't comment on whether it gives more pleasure to the reader to have both books under their belt.
  • (5/5)
    Travelers are waylaid to the mining town of Desperation, Nevada, where they are imprisoned and slaughtered by a monstrous entity wearing the skin of a traffic cop.This is a parallel novel to The Regulators, published under King's pseudonym of Richard Bachman, in that it has the same characters and premise but the story unfolds very differently. I liked The Regulators more because it was different from King's usual fare, but this is a terrific read as well. In the venerable Stephen King tradition, a small group of ordinary people must work together to battle an extraordinary evil and make a stand for the white.Read upon release (1996) because King is one of my favorite authors.
  • (4/5)
    Desperation by Stephen KingThe Carver family, Ralph, Ellen, David and Kristen, are on a fun filled vacation trip. They are enjoying the trip until they have a blow-out of one of the tires on the R.V. Their lives are suddenly turned up-side down when they meet up with a police officer who takes them into the town of Desperation.Peter and Mary are on their way home to New York when they are stopped by a police officer. Things go from bad to worse when the police officer finds a bag of pot in the trunk of their car. They take a ride with the officer into the town of Desperation.Several others have the misfortune of meeting the cop from hell. They soon figure out that this is not a simply case of a cop gone bad. They have little time to figure out what is going on and get out of the town of Desperation.The book holds my attention through most of the book but falters some close to the end. I don't think this is one of Mr. Kings better novels but I still enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    I couldn't put it down. Lost lots of sleep reading this deep into the night. Another excellent story by Mr. King!
  • (2/5)
    I tried to like this book. I really did. But it wasn't to be. Originally, I said to a friend that this book was a short story that was tortured into a novel. Later I just said that this was a torturous novel. Yes, there is some interesting theology, but man, it comes at the expense of a good story being depicted. I've already got a source for interesting theology. I turn to King for a story. On this occasion, he left me hanging.
  • (4/5)
    This dry story is part of a Lovecraftian universe SK works with throiugh several pieces. Tak! Desperation is a town in Arizona or one of those sunny states where the cow bones bleach in the sun and we KNOW there's something wrong from the first time our normees are stopped by this big ole po-leesh-man.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book for the typical King reasons. The whole premise behind the horror, which is often left untold, is hit on and I really enjoyed the details explanation and eerie details that closed the book.
  • (2/5)
    Probably my least favorite King book. Depressing, grim and confusing.
  • (4/5)
    This was the first of Stephen King's books I've read in a long time that didn't seem to fall into his normal pattern. It seem like his novels have been settled into a three part system: long character set up, something bad happening, and then he introduces a weird out of place monster to for the characters to overcome. This pattern tends to hinder my enjoyment in the books because the set up is so good that when the first bad things start to happen it's really breathtaking, but then, as almost always, he just throws in a monster that never lives up to the build-up and it's all down hill from there.Desperation sort of breaks this tradition by beginning in the middle, with the bad, and filling in all the character pieces as the book goes along. There's still a weird monster to overcome, but for once I think it works a whole heck of a lot better in this new format.
  • (4/5)
    Tack! Great Horror book. Don't get caught in the town of Desperation...you'll never get out again.
  • (5/5)
    I'd almost given up on Stephen King. When I was a teenager, he scared me half to death and back again with books like "'Salem's Lot," "The Shining" and "The Dead Zone." But then he entered a sloppy period--a literary wasteland with books like "The Tommyknockers," "Insomnia" and "Rose Madder;" books that were aimed more to turn your stomach than to whiten your knuckles.Then along came "Desperation," a masterpiece of bite-your-nails-to-the-quick terror.All hail the return of the King!This is the Stephen King of the early years, where he built his reputation on burrowing under the reader's skin with finely-detailed, cleanly-written tales of ordinary men and women suddenly thrust in horrible, extraordinary circumstances. The horror grew out the way King twisted the familiar sights and sounds of our contemporary world into the very real possibility of the supernatural threat. In "The Stand," a global plague starts off innocently enough with the common cold and flu. What reader hasn't had the sniffles at least once a year? I don't know about you, but for a month after reading "The Stand," I was paralyzed with fear every time I sneezed.In "Desperation," King once again plays and preys on our universal paranoia. This time, it's our fear of law enforcement. Again, the dread starts quietly enough. A good-ole-boy lawman named Collie Entragian is pulling motorists over on a lonely stretch of deserted highway in Nevada. Entragian issues tickets for minor things--missing taillights, parking by the side of the road--but as the characters soon learn, there's more madness than method to his citations. You see, what they don't realize is that Entragian is one of the scariest characters to be brewed up inside King's head since Randall Flagg, the unforgettable villain of "The Stand."In less time than it takes to say, "There must be some mistake, officer; I was only going 60 mph," Entragian has corralled a small group of tourists traveling the backroads of Nevada and jailed them back in Desperation, a nearly deserted mining town. Nearly deserted. There's an evil that looms even larger than the out-of-control cop, but to say more would be to ruin some of King's most effective "boos" in this novel."Desperation" works so well as page-turning terror primarily because King knows what really scares us--and it's not gorefests like Freddy Krueger and company; it's closer to the unseen horror of "The Blair Witch Project." In "Desperation," he draws on creepy pop classics--books like "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," movies like "The Stepford Wives" and "Westworld," songs like "Hotel California." These aren't leap-out-and-go-boo frighteners. These are filled with slow chills that creep up your spine in broad daylight; the unease you can't shake even if you put on some happy bubblegum music like Hanson or watch a carefree Gene Kelly movie. It's the dread you can't get out of your head.This is not to say that King doesn't occasionally take the easy way out with excessive and needless violence. Blood and guts? Sure, there's plenty of those here. What else would you expect from a novel whose opening line is "Oh! Oh, Jesus! Gross!"? And then there's problems with the third act where the supernatural events careen wildly out of control and characters perform unbelievable acts that don't really keep with the rest of the book's subtle tone.But even in the midst of excess, King knows how to tighten the screws. I read the last one hundred pages in one jittery, all-the-lights-on sitting. I hadn't been this scared since "'Salem's Lot."
  • (5/5)
    Written & read by Stephen King just makes the story better.
  • (5/5)
    Not one of Stephen King’s most famous novels its still very good and narrating his own work really brings it alive.
  • (5/5)
    The book was great because of Stephen King's way of drawing characters that I could see in my mind, care about, and believe they could be real. Everyone who thinks they want to write a novel should first read a dozen of King's books and then think again. Stephen King's "horror stories" usually make me cry because of the life-like people with whom he populates them.
  • (3/5)
    It kind of left me silent. Every time I thought I saw the point I realized I didn’t. The concept of good and evil God and SatanAre very confusing.
  • (4/5)
    Read this one about 10 years ago and wanted to revisit it through audio. Classic Stephen King. Decent story and characters. Glad I enjoyed it again .
  • (5/5)
    Its so interesting i love it, got me hooked in the 1st 5 minutes, the ending is sad and beutiful!!
  • (5/5)
    A decent re-imagining of a "shadow over Innsmouth" kind of story. Good characters, good pace
  • (5/5)
    Bravo. Loved every bit of it, as always I'm a fan.
  • (5/5)
    Another solid book by the king. I should have read this then the regulators m
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books written by Stephen king I’ve ever read
  • (5/5)
    Once again Mr. King never ceases to amaze me an move me
  • (5/5)
    Superb detailed descriptions! Keeps my attention! Love these books! Awesome!
  • (2/5)
    Have loved Stephen king since a teen. Read many of his books, love his writing but this one, not so much!!
  • (5/5)
    It’s a bit weird and nothing I would normally pick but I loved the ending and not the way I would have thought Steven King would have written.
  • (4/5)
    This is my second read of desperation by Stephen King. I can say this book is enjoyable and pretty unpredictable with religious undertones. One thing I don't quite enjoy is how much of the storyline depends on a young boy who basically has lost everything. That makes it tough to care about the outcome of the book. You're left wanting for hope and not quite getting that at the end.
  • (5/5)
    Long but worth it! It gives you things to think about while be entertaining you and a little scary and thrilling. It’s S. King; what else do you need to know❗?
  • (5/5)
    I got the paperback copy of Stephen King’s DESPERATION for Christmas some many years back, and it sat on my shelf far too long before I picked it up and read it. This was one of King’s 90’s efforts, which some of his avid fans think is his lesser period after he’d kicked his alcohol and drug habits, although I would disagree. I remember catching a TV miniseries version back in the 2000’s, co-starring Ron Pearlman, but as good as that show was, the book is so much better, even if in many ways, DESPERATION is a potboiler, where a sundry group of characters are thrown into a perilous situation, and must find away to save themselves. If the book hits on some of King’s familiar horror tropes, then he plays them here like a master here.Many horror stories succeed or fail on the nature of the Big Bad, and in DESPERATION, I would give King an A+ with his creation of Tak, an evil entity (the Unformed) existing deep under the Nevada desert, that is until an old mine shaft is opened in the China Pit just outside the little town of Desperation, located in the middle of nowhere off of Rt. 50. Tak may well be a pagan God, one that ravenously craves death. Though unable to leave its underground lair, Tak is able to take physical possession any unwary human who wanders too close, and falls into its grip, literally entering their bodies and grotesquely swelling them with its life force. Not only that, but most of the local wildlife – canine, insect, reptile, and avian – come under the entity’s control. First a mine manager, then a receptionist, and finally a cop, becomes Tak’s vessel, and soon the human population of Desperation has all but been wiped out. But I give King credit, he does not make his villain all powerful, it may deal out a lot of carnage with its oversized victims, but the possessed bodies very quickly break down, necessitating a constant jump to another one, which just as quickly starts to fall apart. In Collie Entragian, the monster sized cop from hell, King has created one of his most fearsome, and memorable, antagonists. In some ways, Tak is similar to Pennywise from IT, another evil force that hides itself underground and lures the unsuspecting into its clutches, but in DESPERATION, the sober King wisely does not give this evil a cosmic mythology that nearly derails the book. The other thing DESPERATION has going for it is King’s deft talent for characterization, as the malevolent Entragian picks off one traveler on the highway after another, and throws them into the Desperation jail. I became totally invested in these people right from the get go, feared for their safety, and worried what final fate would befall them. The two standouts of this group, who must ultimately face Tak on his home ground, are eleven year old David Carver, and the very middle aged author Johnny Marinville. King has always had an uncanny ability to write wonderful child characters, from the boys in THE BODY, to the Losers Club in IT, to THE GIRL WHO LOVED TOM GORDON, to Danny Torrance in THE SHINING; they remain among his most vivid creations. I think David might be among the author’s best, a boy whose faith in God is put to an awful test. Marinville is a character familiar to any King reader, a once famous literary lion whose talent has been rusted away by alcohol and toxic fame. David’s family makes the mistake of traveling to Vegas in an RTV, while Marinville, hoping to get his writing mojo going again, takes a cross country motorcycle trip, which ends with all of them fighting for survival against Tak in the town of Desperation. Johnny and David instantly go to the top of my list of favorite King characters, a pair of most unlikely heroes.In many of King’s books, he speculates about the nature of God, none more so than in DESPERATION. As in THE STAND, the God who emerges from King’s writing is not the loving deity of Sunday morning sermons, but a harder and sterner God, one who asks terrible things of his children when they are beset by a vile evil, when even his most faithful break under the weight of the struggle. There is an ongoing argument between the young believer, David, and the selfish cynic, Johnny, that I found most interesting, and to be some of King’s best writing. That King raises questions and then leaves it to the reader to answer fully is as it should be. One thing King is not mysterious about is the nature of evil, for his Tak is an all devouring entity, alien in every way to humanity, incapable of feeling anything but a voracious desire to kill and destroy. It is the embodiment of selfishness itself. Those who like what King calls “the gross out” will not be disappointed here, the story has a high violence and gore content, even by the King’s standards; all that and plenty of creepy crawly encounters with spiders, rattlesnakes, scorpions, not to mention man killing coyotes and a hateful wolf. There is a high body count, and no punches are pulled when it comes to certain characters that would have been considered safe in many other mainstream horror novels. As in many of King’s books, there is a pause near the end of the mid section of the story where a lot of back story, exposition, and explanation are laid out, a necessary trope in order for the main characters to gain information they will need to take on Tak in the novel’s climax. If a lot of the final showdown feels familiar to any “constant reader,” that’s fine by me, as I feel we have become so invested in David and Johnny, along with Steve, Cynthia, Mary, and Ralph, that we should hardly notice. And there are a few references that date the book to the mid 90’s, like video rental stores, Albert Belle, spotty cell coverage, and hating Bill Clinton instead of Hillary. If King were writing it today, he would have to tweak it in the era of GPS and the Internet.There is a companion book to DESPERATION, written by King under the name of Richard Bachman, titled THE REGULATORS, which I managed to read a few years back, and though not quite the epic ride of DESPERATION, it is a nasty (in the best way), and fun read on its own. I highly recommend it. A few years after this book was published, Stephen King narrowly survived being hit by a motorist while out on walk. He pulled through, and was able to resume his writing career. Many readers have noted a change in his books since then, complaining that he too often rewrites himself, and regurgitates old themes he’s already visited. Too often in these latter books we are forced to witness another character’s struggle with substance abuse, or muse on the finer points of making music – two things very important to King. But this latter period has produced some great books: 11-22-63, DUMA KEY, FROM A BUICK 8, DOCTOR SLEEP, CELL, and the Bill Hodges trilogy. I would consider any of them to be among his finest. And after the success of IT on the big screen, I am sure some Hollywood producer, either at the studios, or at Netflix or Amazon Prime, is looking for another King title to make into a movie. I would respectfully suggest they take another look at DESPERATION and consider a reboot. It has a good story, great characters, and plenty of opportunities to scare the audience in the best way possible.
  • (3/5)
    I love Stephen King and always look forward to a book he has written. While the story is good in the usual Stephen King fashion...the book itself is way, way, way too long with way, way, way too much useless detail... long and drawn out dialogues... and the excessive over-the-top character development. After about 100 pages or so the plot thins and I found myself caring little for the characters. That was unfortunate as the paperback edition had 693. Still he is still the King of Horror...Long live the King!
  • (5/5)
    This book was absolutely wonderful. It was disgustingly wonderfully suspenseful.