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A Study in Charlotte

A Study in Charlotte


A Study in Charlotte

valutazioni:
4/5 (257 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 2016
ISBN:
9780062417329
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

The first book in a witty, suspenseful new trilogy about a brilliant new crime-solving duo: the teen descendants of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. This clever page-turner will appeal to fans of Maureen Johnson and Ally Carter.

Jamie Watson has always been intrigued by Charlotte Holmes; after all, their great-great-great-grandfathers are one of the most infamous pairs in history. But the Holmes family has always been odd, and Charlotte is no exception. She’s inherited Sherlock’s volatility and some of his vices—and when Jamie and Charlotte end up at the same Connecticut boarding school, Charlotte makes it clear she’s not looking for friends.

But when a student they both have a history with dies under suspicious circumstances, ripped straight from the most terrifying of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Jamie can no longer afford to keep his distance. Danger is mounting and nowhere is safe—and the only people they can trust are each other.

A HarperAudio production.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 2016
ISBN:
9780062417329
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Brittany Cavallaro is the author of the New York Times bestselling Charlotte Holmes series and the poetry collection Girl-King. She earned her BA in literature from Middlebury College and her MFA in poetry from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She lives in Michigan. Find her at her website, www.brittanycavallaro.com, or on Twitter @skippingstones.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Charlotte and Jamie are the latest generation of Holmes and Watsons. They meet up a boarding school where Jamie romanticizes Charlotte and she indulges his perceptions - at least for a time. Behind the Sherlock Holmes style, Ms. Cavallaro manages to make Charlotte and Jamie real people. Charlotte is an addict trying to cope with the aftermath of a rape and growing up brilliant in a dysfunctional family. And Jamie, while dealing with more prosaic issues, is trying to cope with his anger at the father that abandoned his mother and went on to have a whole new happy family.
  • (3/5)
    This was a fun read, though I'm not sure that I'll pick up the second one. Maybe eventually? It's a bit of a modern take on Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick, Watson. But in this story, our Sherlock is a girl named Charlotte, and her deductive reasoning skills are all that you'd expect from a Holmes. Our Watson is a boy named James, and he is also everything you'd expect from a Watson. When a murder occurs, they both end up on the heels of the case together, trying to solve things before one or both of them ends up killed.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about teen Jamie Watson who is sent to a boarding school in Connecticut on a Rugby scholarship to pursue his interest in writing. The drawback is that he didn't want to leave his family in England to return to the states where his father's new family is. On the plus side, Charlotte Holmes, who he has admired from afar since he could understand the stories of their families, is also a student. Soon, the teens are embroiled in a murder mystery which has them living up to their respective heritages.I really did enjoy this book. Jamie's feelings of anger about his family are pretty understandable and rang true to me. Charlotte's family issues seemed a little less realistic, but did stay true to the Holmes mythos. Glimpses into the why of how she is were quite tragic on many fronts. I liked the relationship between the two and how they seemed determined to keep in form with their own self-perceptions and preconceived notions of each other. Between the Holmes/Watson dynamic and the murder mystery it was a story that moved right along and didn't bore me at all.I'm very much interested in moving on to the next book of the series.
  • (4/5)
    I thought this was a great reimagining of the Sherlock Holmes story. Jamie Watson and Charlotte Holmes have good chemistry together, and I can see them working well as a team in the future. I liked how Charlotte had the remarkable intellect of Sherlock Holmes, as well as the self doubt and insecurities of a teenage girl. Sure she was unemotional most of the book, but there were glimpses of her other side too. That made her seem more 3 dimensional. The mystery was a solid one, and I am looking forward to the next book in the trilogy.
  • (3/5)
    I received this book as a free summer audio book. It is a story of the offspring of Sherlock Holmes and Watson as teens. Charlotte Holmes is a troublesome teen with addiction issues who has been sent to the states to a school and Jamie Watson also ends up in this school. Murder happens and they work together as a team (or not) to solve the case. I did not particularly like this book. I did not like Charlotte much. There really was nothing special here except the references to various works from the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. I also did not appreciate the language in the book.
  • (3/5)
    Very fun idea: descendants of the Homes, Watson, and Moriarty families continue to have interesting relationships. Teenage Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson have a case to solve at boarding school. Clever and cute.
  • (4/5)
    Book one, this series revolves around Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson, the descendants of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.Jamie has always been fascinated with Charlotte, but he’s never been around her much until he ends up at the same boarding school in America. His mother finds the Holmes family to be worth little of her time, so she discourages Jamie’s interest. When he moves to the United States to be closer to his father, he finds himself as a classmate to Charlotte. Charlotte is not your average student. She’s famous for solving a case at a young age and has little regard for people. She seems close with her roommate who dates Jamie’s friend. She also seems to like drugs more than she should, a Holmes problem.Shortly after Jamie’s arrival, there’s a murder and it’s assumed Jamie or Charlotte are the culprits. The murdered student was far from a nice guy and had run-ins with both of them. Jamie now has what he’s always wanted--a case to solve with Charlotte Holmes. She’s a lot more to deal with than he could have imagined. With the help of his father, he learns the “rules” for dealing with a Holmes. Of course the mystery is solved in the end, but the machinations of the Holmes family becomes clearer. The sacrifices the Watsons make to help the unappreciative Holmes and the mysterious relationship between Charlotte and Moriarty give it more depth than an amusing modern retelling of Holmes and Watson. I really fell into this story, but I do enjoy Sherlock Holmes, especially the PBS version. Charlotte is as difficult and as “Holmes” as a girl could be--so, she’s difficult. I look forward to hearing more of the series. I found these when Audiobook Sync released this novel this summer. Consider listening to it!
  • (5/5)
    I cannot say enough good things about this. The writing was absolutely superb, even breathtaking in places. You can totally tell that the author is a poet.

    The mystery was masterfully constructed, and the main relationship is deep, intense, and respectful. Holmes has boundaries, and Watson respects them. It is beautiful and I loved it, and I went out and bought the second book before I'd gotten to the halfway point.
  • (3/5)
    This novel was good. But that's all I have to say. It wasn't spectacular. It wasn't special. As I kept reading, I found myself growing disinterested. There was no charm, no fun, no wit to anything. While Charlotte does embody Sherlock's character, she doesn't have any charm to make me want to like her or even admire her. Jamie's character is reduced to a bumbling, hot-headed teenager who just seems besotted by Charlotte. They didn't seem to really work well together, at least not as well as the real Sherlock and Watson did. I found the premise of the novel itself to be quite interesting, but I was quickly able to deduce who was the perpetrator behind the murder. The reasoning behind it was passable but the author really was trying to work on too many different angles, making it all quite muddled. Overall, this was a decent book but it did nothing for me. I think I'm just going to wait for the new season of Sherlock for my next Holmes and Watson fix.
  • (3/5)
    Jamie Watson has been waiting all 16 years of his life to meet her: Charlotte Holmes, his great-great-great-grandfather's best friend's great-great-great-granddaughter. They just happen to end up at the same Connecticut boarding school, and as soon as they meet a fellow student just happens to be murdered. Funny how that works. Jamie and Charlotte are being framed for the attack, and another, and must work together to figure out who is setting them up and how to stop them. And by "work together" I mean Jamie needs to keep her off drugs and get out of her way.I'll call this book "weak", somewhat charitably. The mystery is not compelling and the clues were broadcast so loudly I could hear them a mile away. I was looking forward to meeting the young, modern versions of Watson and Holmes, and watching them meet each other. However, when the book starts they already "know" each other by reputation, despite having never met, and by taking this shortcut the author denies us the chance to see sparks fly when the two meet for the first time. That would have been the best part of the book, if it was in it. Instead, Jamie comes from a long line of identical Watsons and Charlotte from a long line of identical Holmeses. My two biggest problems with the book are somewhat related to this premise. Firstly, this first book in a series does nothing to ease us into the lives of Holmes and Watson. Because there is no "getting to know you" period, it's high drama almost from the get-go, with constant heavy references to the original Sherlock Holmes stories, various minor characters from those stories popping up to betray the main characters, and the climax of the mystery hinging on a generations-old feud. There is so much ancillary drama that it completely overshadows the mystery, such that by the time I got toward the end I had fully forgotten that any students were attacked in the first place, or that Holmes and Watson were framed for it.Cavallaro's effort to gender-bend the character of Sherlock is well-intentioned. Doyle's stories are a sausage fest! But by changing Sherlock to Charlotte, leaving Watson male, and keeping Watson as the first person POV, Cavallaro walks right into a much more modern but equally tired trope - Charlotte Holmes is a manic pixie dream girl. She is an enigma who comes out of nowhere to make boring Watson's life more interesting so that he doesn't have to develop a personality. She is small in stature and needs him to take care of her. Worst of all, because of the Holmes/Watson legacy, Watson has basically been stalking Holmes his entire life. He has scrapbooks of news stories about her and has written fanfic about the two of them for years. It's super creepy! Because Watson is male and Charlotte is female, obviously he must be in love with her. We are told constantly about how he feels about her, with little regard for how she feels about him. She is not interested a relationship, as is canon, but it's because she was raped, not because she's just *not interested*. How tiresome. I have noticed that this is popularly read in audiobook format, and if I had done that instead I might have been able to overlook the book's shortcomings more.
  • (4/5)
    It was hard to separate this from all the other Sherlock Holmes professional fanfics out there. Contemporary Holmes? Been done. Gender-bent Holmes? Seen it. Grandchildren with cloned personalities? SNOOZE!But once I moved past the overwhelming "been there, done that" sensation, the story itself was really good and I believe I will eventually continue the series.
  • (3/5)
    Jamie Watson, descendant of Dr. John Watson, attends a boarding school in Connecticut where Charlotte Holmes, descendant of the great detective Sherlock Holmes, attends. They soon find themselves suspects in a murder of a fellow student. Trust no one. A Moriarty's involvement in their problem is almost certain. I suspect the book moves a little slower than the average teenager's attention, but readers familiar with the Sherlock Holmes stories will recognize similarities and differences between the characters in this novel and the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle books as well as parallels to the stories themselves, most of which are pointed out. It was okay, but not outstanding. I prefer Doyle's stories. I listened to the audio provided by AudioFile Sync for this summer's teen listeners.
  • (3/5)
    The modern day descendants of Holmes and Watson meet at a New England boarding school and make a connection as it becomes clear they are being framed for murder and assault. Charlotte Holmes is a troubled drug using cast off from her wealthy family, while James Watson is raking advantage of a rugby scholarship away away from the too costly school in London. The characters were decent, though James Watson is a bit too good to be real, but the story telling is weighed down with an over elaborate plot and has real pacing issues.Well, I find that even with a slant of Holmes/Watson fun, I find middle-to-upper income level white problems less interesting than tales including diversity themes. Although a favorite gay uncle is mentioned, so +0.1.
  • (3/5)
    looking forward to book 2
  • (4/5)
    So good!!!! I love a good if mystery, and this is a great one for teens! It's not just a modern Sherlock...
  • (3/5)
    A Sherlock Holmes- tie-in, though, in my opinion, that felt a bit overdone. What kept me reading and immersed in the tale was Jamie Watson's sharp narrative voice. Not your usual "dull" Watson in this book, and I would've like to have seen the father-son relationship between Jamie and his dad explored even more.
  • (5/5)
    This book was totally awesome on how she brought the Holmes and the Watsons together throughout history and how this likely couple found themselves in yet another dangerous adventure. She even brought into play the Moriaritys. She is ingenious in her tale telling and it has the w elements of Sir Arthur Canon Doyle. - Absolutely loved this book !
  • (4/5)
    I received this as an ARC/eGalley from the publisher. This review was originally published on Edelweiss on December 2, 2015:

    As a Sherlockian, I make it my aim to seek out and experience any iteration of the Great Detective and his friend and biographer, Dr. John Watson. I also enjoy reading YA and I was happy to experience both in the same story.

    It's refreshing to see a female personification of Holmes in Charlotte, and Jamie Watson is charming in his own right. There are plenty of references to the original stories, and naturally they are descendants of the famous duo, and that comes with all sorts of expectations and baggage. It's also pretty funny.

    This novel addresses addiction, rape, and family problems in addition to a murder investigation and high school crushes. It's not particularly brutal, but I would recommend this to a more mature reader.

    If you already like Sherlock Holmes stories, this is a must read. If you like realistic YA fiction and/or mysteries, this is a good story and may introduce you to one of the most influential and recognized characters in Western Literature today.
  • (4/5)
    If you enjoy Sherlock Holmes-themed stories, this one would be a five-star story. If you're not as enamored of Holmesiana, I'd knock off a star. The crimes, for example, are unrealistic, as is the villain. But the story is told well and the characters are likeable Holmes/Watson variations. I particularly like the idea that Holmes & Watson traits are shared by their descendants.
  • (5/5)
    had heard nothing but great things about the book, and was wondering if it would be worth it to listen to the audie. There have been times where I listened to the narrator with a British accent, and I shut the darn thing off because it put me to sleep. But this audie was definitely worth listening to.I wasn't expecting Jamie and Charlotte to become a couple in the book, but the relationship works and the timing was perfect. Charlotte possesses all of the traits that today's readers would associate with the typical "Sherlock Holmes" character: she hates her family, her brother Milo and her have a complicated relationship (at best), smoking, doing drugs, she lacks empathy, and has a knack for deducing.But she doesn't expect Jamie Watson. Jamie fantasizes about the great adventures that he and Charlotte would eventually have when he attends the same boarding school as her. However, Jamie must be chided for putting Charlotte up on a pedestal. I think Jamie has his own selfish expectations about what hanging out with Holmes would be; he wants to live out the stories that James Watson and Sherlock Holmes have done many years before. But Jamie realizes that Charlotte has her own problems that stem from this fame, and Charlotte comes to develop a strong and deep friendship with Jamie, which helps her break down her own boundaries and sees just how far she is willing to go when matters get very serious. Each have their own flaws, and that's one of the main components about why this adaption works. Some parts are heavy -- especially where the murderer talks about retrospectively planning Charlotte's rape and how Jamie & Charlotte can never really trust each other until the very end -- but somehow it works. It shouldn't, according to "the human laws of relationships", but it does.The animation that the narrator works into the telling of the story strengthens Jamie's character, and it provides cliffhangers when necessary. The epilogue, which is from Charlotte's point of view, is great in itself and I'm hoping we will see more books in the series, and more stories with multiple points of view (from Charlotte and Jamie together).
  • (4/5)
    One of excellent re-telling of my fav classic. It’s a 4.5
  • (4/5)
    The first 3/4 of this book where amazing but the ending seemed out of place

  • (5/5)

    Like many of the other reviewers, I chose to read “A Study in Charlotte” because, as a fan of anything Sherlockian, the idea of a YA novel featuring two of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson fascinated me. I was not let down.

    The characters, Jamie Watson and Charlotte Holmes, were perfectly accurate to their famous forebearers; however, Brittany Cavallaro has chosen to add them to a modern setting which is more likely to appeal to YA readers. Personally, I adored Jamie and Charlotte; watching their relationship and interactions develop over the course of the narrative.

    As for the plot, I was hooked; I didn't want to put the novel down. Perhaps one of my favourite aspects of the plot was that the mystery itself was a tribute to Arthur Conan Doyle's books; taking bits and pieces from the Sherlock Holmes' mysteries.

    Overall, I truly loved "A Study in Charlotte," and I can't wait to see what the series has in store for Jamie and Charlotte.

    I would certainly recommend this book, especially if you are looking for an engaging mystery that isn't overly gruesome.
  • (5/5)
    Love this variation on Sherlock Holmes. Both Charlotte and Jamie are such great, well-developed characters and I love their relationship.
  • (3/5)
    James Watson is not enjoying life in the American boarding school when he meets fellow student Charlotte Holmes. He knows all about her - after all, their great-great-grandfathers had been best of friends! But things quickly deteriorate when their classmates start being murdered and Watson & Holmes are prime suspects. What can they do but investigate on their own?I enjoyed this take off on the Sherlock Holmes books but Cavallaro worked a little too hard to make modern Holmes and Watson counterparts of the Arthur Conan Doyle versions. For example, drug addiction and violin playing aren't really inherited traits. However, she did do a good job of blending a Holmesian mystery with a young adult romance & it was a fun twist for the Holmes character to be a female.
  • (4/5)
    This was a fun twist on a Sherlock Holmes mystery with young adults as the main characters. Of course, a mystery ensues and figuring whodunnit is the fun part. I think this book wuld be a great way to introduce teens to the classic mystery writer, Sherlock Holmes. The characters were interesting takes on Watson and holmes, and the mystery is intriguing.
  • (5/5)
    This book was totally awesome on how she brought the Holmes and the Watsons together throughout history and how this likely couple found themselves in yet another dangerous adventure. She even brought into play the Moriaritys. She is ingenious in her tale telling and it has the w elements of Sir Arthur Canon Doyle. - Absolutely loved this book !
  • (3/5)
    3.5 this was a book absolutely outside my comfort zone but unexpectedly I quite enjoyed. REALLY GOOD STORY
  • (3/5)
    This was more of 3,5 but that's not an option. I enjoyed it! It had some really funny bits and would totally recommend it!
  • (4/5)
    Jamie Watson, the great-great-great-grandson of James Watson, knows about his family's history. He's read the stories and knows the current Holmes, Charlotte, is better admired from afar. When a murder, taken straight from the Sherlock Holmes stories, they'll have to work together to solve it.This was an interesting story. Though I do have my doubts about Sherlock Holmes marrying (or not marrying) and having a child to inherit his genius, I did like that Charlotte and Jamie were not carbon copies of the original Holmes and Watson. They work well off each other.The plot progressed at a good pace, though at times I did find it difficult to work out the logic. There were multiple instances of the 'F' word being used, which put me off. Overall, though, it was an enjoyable read.I would recommend this to Holmes fans who don't mind a modern-day twist.