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Landline: A Novel

Landline: A Novel

Scritto da Rainbow Rowell

Narrato da Rebecca Lowman


Landline: A Novel

Scritto da Rainbow Rowell

Narrato da Rebecca Lowman

valutazioni:
4/5 (176 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Pubblicato:
Jul 8, 2014
ISBN:
9781427239334
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Nota del redattore

Humor & a magic phone…

In her return to adult literature, Rowell uses her signature humor and a magic phone to explore whether young love like in “Eleanor & Park” can survive the everyday pressures of caring for family and achieving career goals.

Descrizione

From the New York Times best-selling author of Eleanor & Park and Fangirl, comes a hilarious, heart-wrenching take on love, marriage, and magic phones.

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply — but that almost seems beside the point now. Maybe that was always beside the point.

Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her — Neal is always a little upset with Georgie — but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go without her. When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.

That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts. Is that what she’s supposed to do?

A Macmillan Audio production.

Pubblicato:
Jul 8, 2014
ISBN:
9781427239334
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Rainbow Rowell lives in Omaha, Nebraska. She has written two bestselling YA novels, Fangirl and Eleanor & Park, which spent six weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.


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Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Landline

3.8
176 valutazioni / 103 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    I love reading Rainbow Rowell books and I love that she is from Omaha where my sister lives and the fact Rainbow worked at a newspaper, like I did in college. Sometimes I feel like we have gone on the same type of path, except I haven't written any wonderful books. I really enjoyed this book and pretty much read it in one day. Georgie and Seth have been writing partners for almost 20 years, since college. Georgie and Neal met in college and have been married for 14 years. Seth and Georgie get the opportunity to have their own TV pilot but they have to write four episodes over the Christmas holiday which means Georgie can't go to Omaha to spend the holidays with his Mom. So Neal leaves with the girls and goes home without really saying good-bye.

    According to Georgie, they have always had issues in their marriage. Neal doesn't seem happy with the situation. He's a stay-at-home Dad and is a fantastic cartoonist but doesn't use his talents as a job, he considers it a hobby. Georgie is a little frazzled, she doesn't have time to get a new battery for her phone so it's always dying.

    Georgie starts staying at her Mom's house during the holidays and starts talking to Neal on the landline to landline but it's the Neal from college, the Christmas she thought he broke up with her but instead he showed up and proposed.

    The big question is, did this really happen in real life? Is she going to blow it and convince Neal he should break up with her for good. If she does convince him, what happens to their little girls Alice and Noomi. This book asks the big question, if you could go back and fix something in your past would you do it? Georgie has to decide can she fix her marriage talking to the old Neal or can she ruin it.

    I really enjoyed Georgie's family life with her Mom, way too young Father-in-law and her sister Heather who is 18. There is humor in this book that will make you smile and a little crazy. But I never got mad while reading it. I will say, her college days reminded me of when I was working on the college newspaper in a really old building. That's where I met my husband who was also on the newspaper staff.

    Give this a read. Then if you haven't read any other books by Rainbow, read them all, she is a wonderful and entertaining writer.
  • (4/5)
    Better than Fangirl, not as good as Eleanor & Park.
  • (5/5)
    It's very different from her other books. but somehow I just loved it!
  • (2/5)
    Cute premise, but I never really liked the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Georgie and Heather's mother is an absolutely dreadful character. I mean COME ON, if your daughter is telling you that she and her husband are not separating, don't tell her that she will move on and be okay in every conversation.

    Other than that, great book!
  • (4/5)
    Rainbow Rowell can write dialogue that is clever and raw. She has a distinct style and I find it captivating. She has a gift for connecting the reader to her characters. I love the hidden gems of Omaha in her novels. Landline is a quick read about a wife in the middle of a marriage crisis with her husband. To figure things out she recalls how they met and how they worked through their first fight.
  • (3/5)
    I dunno. It had some cute parts, but this book just made me angsty and frustrated. And kinda depressed. Maybe because Georgie and Neal and all the characters are just at a completely different point in their lives than me. I mean. Georgie had a 7 year old kid! She had been married for over a decade. A decade ago I was a freshman in high school. I'm not ready for a midlife crisis. And I didn't find it very fun to be thrust into someone else's. I did like that not everything was as 1st person absorbed as YA tends to be. But for real. This books was frustrating because Georgie was frustrated and there was nothing she or I could do about it. I had to set it down several times because I just couldn't take any more.

    I liked that these characters, while being super animated larger than life Rainbow Rowell creations, did have realistic struggles and feelings. I liked the concept of a time travel phone. I liked the backup characters a lot. Georgie's mom. Scotty. Noomi, the daughter who thinks she's a kitty. Come on. That's just the kind of ridiculous thing a kid would do. Adorable and kinda annoying. I just didn't like the feelings this book made me feel. Like all the worst "no one understands me, I can't get through to anyone even though I won't talk to anyone" angst that made the first half of Goblet of Fire and all of Order of the Phoenix so tough to slog through.

    Maybe I'm just not ready to plunge into the genre of mid life crisis fiction. Whatever. I'm gonna go get my degree in oceanography now.
  • (4/5)
    well done time travel
  • (4/5)
    It's a Rainbow Rowell book so it's obviously great, but it felt slighter than her others. The story was as long as it needed to be, but thus is more of a light confection compared to Fangirl or Eleanor and Park. Sort of a grown up version of The Future of Us.
  • (4/5)
    Cute and feel-good. A nice Christmas story about perseverance in love and not taking your person for granted.
  • (3/5)
    I read Carry On and Fangirl (twice) and wanted to read another book by Rowell so I read this one. I love her writing style--she can get in a character's head so clearly and convey an inner monologue so well. But I didn't like this nearly as much as Fangirl or Carry On. Mostly because I didn't connect well with the main character. She seemed kind of annoying to me and I sided more with her husband than her when he left her. I wasnt' really into the magic phone/time travel thing. I think the story would have been more effective if it was implied that Georgie was imagining it all--that somewhere deep down she had all these thoughts and emotions that were coming out under stress and she figured out what she needed to do on her own. But, since there was a scene when Heather talked to Neal on the landline, the only explanation was that it was a magic phone which just seems lame to me. I liked Cath's and Levi's cameo at the end (because I still am in love with Fangirl) but that was just a simple plot device. I wish that connection was developed a little more--Georgie could have had a real heart-to-heart talk with them during the car ride and their young love could have provided a good foil to Georgie and Neals' stale relationship and they could have offered a nice perspective on love to Georgie. Over all, it was enjoyable because of the writing but not as well developed character-wise or plot-wise as I would have liked.
  • (2/5)
    Rainbow Rowell is a new author for me. I'm sorry to say I didn't like Landline even though it won Goodread's Best Fiction for 2014.I thought this book was boring but I stuck with it hoping it would get interesting. It didn't. The plot was not enjoyable with a troubled marriage where both the husband and wife were self-centered. The wife always put her job before anything else, including spending Christmas with her family. Her husband's personality, or lack thereof, had me wondering why any woman would even consider marrying him.The premise of a magic phone with conversations from the past was not for me. I wanted to like this novel but I just didn't get it.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting story with a bit of magical realism. Quirky and fun, perfect for when you're looking for something just a little bit different from the norm.
  • (4/5)
    Rowell's trademark deft and real characterizations ring true again in this, her frist novel for adults about a woman who is given a chance to reevaluate her marriage and the course of her life. Humor and emotion combine.
  • (4/5)
    Absolutely positively undeniably wonderful. Practically fell in love with this book from page one.
  • (4/5)
    Imagine having a "magic" phone line to the past. That's what happens when Georgie, a TV comedy writer, stays home to work over the Christmas holidays while her husband and two daughters leave for Omaha to visit family without her. The guilt & seemingly frostiness of her husband begin to eat away at her. When her cell phone dies and she's forced to use the landline at her mother's house in an attempt to call her husband, something weird happens and she realizes she's talking to him in the past. She then convinces herself that she's supposed to somehow change the past in order to save her marriage.This is my first read by Rainbow Rowell, but I suspect this is not her best novel. It's a fairly quick read and I enjoyed it more than I didn't enjoy it, although the story line was somewhat farfetched and predictable. What I liked most was Rowell's ability to write enjoyable and convincing dialogue and banter between the characters. That was by far my favorite part of the novel, and where I feel Rowell's strength lies. I do look forward to reading some of her other novels, as they seem to have more positive reviews.
  • (3/5)
    While I enjoyed this book when I was reading it I never really got sucked in. Maybe if I was in a 15 year relationship I would feel differently. Just a bit too much angst for me - There is a whole section in the book where I just thought "ok come on just move this along". And also was I the only person who had a mental image of the protagonist being just a complete slob?
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    I nearly gave it 4 stars but it just wasn't in me. It never really grabbed me like I had hoped. I did like the ending actually, and how it all tied together but was hoping for more from it. I do love how vividly she paints every character, you feel like you know all about them down to facial expressions. Such descriptive, great writing, but didn't love it
  • (4/5)
    Overall, more unique, quirky goodness can be found in Rainbow Rowell's newest work. Having also read Fangirl this year, I'm really getting a sense of Rowell's style. I like and can identify with her nerdy, somewhat nonconventional main female characters.

    At first, Landline reads like a slice-of-life of a marriage with young children that is on the rocks. There's a real sense of struggle and sadness in the story. Of wanting to do what's right for family but also wanting to advance career goals. Later, magic phone calls add an element of fantasy. For me, the magic calls were really downplayed. I assumed the story would center on the awesomeness of this power, but I really have to stress that the focus of this story is maintaining and strengthening marriage. I was expecting a little more of a romantic comedy, so I also have to stress that the story is fairly serious. It has funny moments, but also has lots of stress and family disfunction.

    Most of all, I enjoyed the sweet holiday ending. It was classic Christmas movie worthy.
  • (2/5)
    DNF.

    I'm a huge fan of Rainbow Rowell's YA books, but I wasn't able to connect with this one.
  • (5/5)
    Rainbow Rowell is becoming one of my favorite authors. I've read all of her books and have enjoyed each of them. In Rowell's latest novel, Landline, we meet Georgie McCool and her husband, Neal Grafton. They've been married for 14 years, have two beautiful girls, Georgie works her dream job and Neal stays home with the children. They are about to embark on a trip from L.A. to Omaha for a visit with Neal's mom for Christmas. Right before the trip a major player in the television show arena, approaches Georgie and her best friend Sean, to develop their own show. This is a dream come true for the two of them, this is what they've wanted since college. What's a great opportunity without a catch? They must come up with four scripts and they have to be done over the Christmas holiday. As the story unfolds, we see Neal going to Omaha without her. Georgie staying in town to work with Sean on the scripts. She reflects on how they first met, how they got married, and then the impossible happens. Her phone dies and she finds the old landline that was in her room when she was younger. She tries calling Neal, but the unexpected happens. The landline puts her in contact with Neal, not in the present, but in the past. Can Georgie fix her marriage by talking to Neal in the past? Will she convince him he should've never married her? What lengths will she go to, to keep the man of her dreams? To find out the answers to these questions, you've gotta pick up Landline by Rainbow Rowell!
  • (3/5)
    I LOVE Rainbow Rowell. I only discovered her this year with Carry On and this my 4th book by this amazing author since then. She is excellent at capturing all of the angst that goes along with adolescence and young adulthood, from navigating a first love to all of the social landmines of high school and college. But unfortunately, Landline is the story of a rocky marriage between adults. Not only that, but adults with 2 children. I find it hard to believe if someone is deciding whether or not a marriage is worth saving, that the focus would still be on the cute dimples that appear whenever he smiles. Still, there's definitely a feel-good vibe about this book, with a plot that is very similar to that Christmas classic, It's a Wonderful Life. Enjoyable, but not her best. Will I read more by this amazing author? Definitely!
  • (4/5)
    This was a fun read, if a bit predictable, but I have to admit that I wanted something more. It seemed like it veered away from some of the conversations it brought up which, if explored, might have offered a bit more weight and depth. It just sort of stopped short of going there, seemingly wanting to keep the book light. As a result, it didn't engage me as much as I might have, and while it made me laugh and entertained me... I often wanted more. I probably will read more of Rowell's work, but I'll expect a heavier dose of humor than depth.
  • (4/5)
    Good book! I usually like books with a little time travel aspect and this one didn't disappoint!
  • (4/5)
    There can't be all that many novels about women TV writers trying to move up to their own show and being a show-runner, so it's odd that I read two so close to each other. This one is also a bit of magical realism. And it was adorable. I don't know what I expected, but it wasn't a story about a marriage on the rocks, let alone one about a phone from the twilight zone that enables the heroine to call her husband in the past. I love that the fantastic element is acknowledged to be weird, but that it isn't ever explained. Anyway, the marriage and the stresses therein felt real, as well as the desire to reconnect and make things better.


    Library copy
  • (4/5)
    Georgie tells her husband that she needs to stay in LA over Christmas - something has come up at work - and hopes he will agree to stay with her. He doesn't, and takes the kids to visit his mother, leaving Georgie wondering just how much trouble her marriage is in.She's desperate to talk to her husband, but when she picks up the phone, what she gets is a chance to talk to Neal of 15 years ago. Neal as he was before kids, before marriage, before university graduation...This could make for an oddly lopsided love story, because Neal of the past gets more of a say than his present-day self, whose presence is felt more through his absence. However, I thought it actually worked really well: 20-something Neal is grappling with a lot of the same questions as 30-something Georgie: What sort of sacrifices and compromises does staying together require? Can they deal with the pressure Georgie's career puts on their relationship? Is love enough?Georgie's inexplicably magic (time-travelling) phone gives her is not so much a chance to pretend to be 22 again as a chance to talk with Neal honestly about themselves. Without being able to hide behind chatter about their girls, or what's going on at work, or current events. And, in getting to know past!Neal better, she gets to understand her Neal better.Rowell's really good at writing this sort of story. I loved the conversations and the descriptions and the characters and everything.
  • (3/5)
    I think I'm too old to read these type of books anymore. It was entertaining, I guess, but there really wasn't anything memorable about it, plot or character-wise. Generously giving it 3 stars because it managed to get me out of a tiny reading slump after a couple of super busy weeks!
  • (4/5)
    I have enjoyed all of Rainbow Rowell's books. They have all been quick, fun reads and this one is no exception. I was intrigued by the concept of a phone that could call into the past. However, I didn't enjoy it as much as I hoped. It reads more like a YA book, but because of the age of the main characters, it didn't work as a YA. I did enjoy it and think it was well worth reading, but I have enjoyed the other Rainbow Rowell books so much that it didn't quite meet the high expectations I had for the book.

    Thank you to the publisher for sending me this book through the GoodReads First Reads program.
  • (1/5)
    This was not a very good book. I thought that it was YA but I don't actually think it was. There was too much use of the f word. YA books will use just about all the other cuss words in the English language, but they don't usually use the f word. Plus the main characters were thirty-something. Late thirties even, and in YA books the characters are rarely over the age of twenty-four.

    The book just didn't hold my interest. I wouldn't have even finished it if I hadn't been listening to it on audio book. I didn't care that much about any of the characters. I felt bad for Georgie's kids because it's hard to have a parent who acts like the most important thing in their life is work. I felt bad for Georgie because her husband, what was his name? That's a record, for me to forget a character's name less then five minutes after I finished reading it. Anyway, I felt bad for Georgie because her husband wasn't very nice to her. I felt bad for Georgie's husband because she acted like her job was way more important then him or their daughters. There's nothing wrong with loving your work, but she was more in love to her job then him. I felt bad for Georgie's best friend, who's name I also don't remember, because he was in love with Georgie and missed his chance to be with her. So I felt sort of bad for all the characters in this book, but I never really cared about what happened to them. I also felt that it was sort of weird that Georgie didn't tell her husband that she'd been talking to his past self and find out that he had never realized that when he was talking to her that weekend that he was talking to her fourteen years in the future.

    Even though I felt bad for the characters, I never really cared for them. It was really more like I felt pity for them. I think the only thing that I really liked in this book was that it was shown that marriage really is hard. You have to work at it, and I guess I liked that it looked like Georgie's marriage wasn't going to end (at least at the end of the book, who knows what will happen in the years out past that unless Georgie stops neglecting her family for her work. But mostly I really didn't care about this book or its characters. I was trying to decide whether I'd give the book one star or two, but I think I'll just give it one. I saw in other people's reviews that they thought Rainbow Rowell's other books were better, so maybe I'll give some of the other ones a chance yet, but I do not recommend this book.