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Romeo and Juliet: The Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

Romeo and Juliet: The Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

Scritto da William Shakespeare

Narrato da Full Cast


Romeo and Juliet: The Fully Dramatized Audio Edition

Scritto da William Shakespeare

Narrato da Full Cast

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (124 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
2 ore
Pubblicato:
Aug 5, 2014
ISBN:
9781442374317
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Folger Shakespeare Library, The World's Leading Center for Shakespeare Studies

The Folger Shakespeare Library, home to the world's largest Shakespeare collection, brings Romeo and Juliet to life with this new full-length, full-cast dramatic recording of its definitive Folger Edition.

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare creates a tragic world in which two young people fall in love. It is not simply that their families disapprove; the Montagues and the Capulets are engaged in a blood feud. This play, set in an extraordinary world, has become the quintessential story of young love. This new full-cast recording — based on the most respected edition of Shakespeare's classic — expertly produced by the Folger Theatre, is perfect for students, teachers, and the everyday listener.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Pubblicato:
Aug 5, 2014
ISBN:
9781442374317
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three children—an older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeare’s only son, died in childhood. The bulk of Shakespeare’s working life was spent in the theater world of London, where he established himself professionally by the early 1590s. He enjoyed success not only as a playwright and poet, but also as an actor and shareholder in an acting company. Although some think that sometime between 1610 and 1613 Shakespeare retired from the theater and returned home to Stratford, where he died in 1616, others believe that he may have continued to work in London until close to his death.

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Romeo and Juliet

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124 valutazioni / 103 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    O teach me how I should forget to think

    I was prepared to be underwhelmed by a jaded near fifty return to this plethora of love-anchored verse. It was quite the opposite, as I found myself steeled with philosophy "adversity's sweet milk" and my appreciation proved ever enhanced by the Bard's appraisal of the human condition. How adroit to have situated such between two warring tribes, under a merciful deity, an all-too-human church and the wayward agency of hormonal teens. Many complain of this being a classic Greek drama adapted to a contemporary milieu. There is also a disproportionate focus on the frantic pacing in the five acts. I can appreciate both concerns but I think such is beyond the point. The chorus frames matters in terms of destiny, a rumination on Aristotelian tragedy yet the drama unfolds with caprice being the coin of the realm. Well, as much agency as smitten couples can manage. Pacing is a recent phenomenon, 50 episodes for McNulty to walk away from the force, a few less for Little Nell to die.

    Shakespeare offers insights on loyalty and human frailty as well as the Edenic cursing of naming in some relative ontology. Would Heidegger smell as sweet? My mind's eye blurs the poise of Juliet with that of Ophelia; though no misdeeds await the Capulet, unless being disinherited by Plath's Daddy is the road's toll to a watery sleep. The black shoe and the attendant violent delights.
  • (4/5)
    Romeo and Juliet. William Shakespeare. Folger Shakespeare Library. 1992. As I said above, this was a book club selection. Cannot remember when I last read this play, but I loved reading it this time. How can I forget how much I love Shakespeare?!! After I read the play, I found a BBC Radio production with Kenneth Branagh playing Romeo and Judie Dench playing Nurse! I really enjoyed reading along as I listened and got more out of the play the second reading. I sort of wanted to listen to it again, but instead decided to watch Zeffierlli’s movie and am so glad I did. A great way to enjoy Shakespeare!
  • (4/5)
    Romeo and Juliet- Manga Classics – by William Shakespeare, by Stacy King, Crystal S. Chan (Adaptation), Julien Choy (Art), Akanovas (Lettering), Jeannie Lee (Lettering)There is no need to go into the synopsis or plot of one of William Shakespeare’s most famous plays. We all know the basics of this story by now. Many have read the play in school or have seen a stage or movie adaptation at one point. So, I think it is safe to skip the analysis. For me, Manga is something I flat out ignored for years because I presumed without ever giving it a fair chance that it would not be something I’d enjoy. Then I discovered it was often geared towards teens or young adults, which was yet another strike against it. But, by sheer accident, I discovered Manga covered a lot of areas, and was much more complex than I’d given it credit for. Having gotten to an age where I’ve dipped my toes in many different genres, and sub-genres, I find that the ‘I’ve outgrown this’ or ‘aged out of’ attitude closes off many unexplored avenues and because I like to think I’m open minded, I’ve begun to reconsider areas I’ve previously closed off. As a result, I’m having a lot of fun learning about Manga, Graphic Novels, and Comics. Much to my surprise, I’ve found a nice selection of classic stories, in Manga/Graphic Novel format. After recently reading a memoir by Olivia Hussey, the actress who portrayed Juliet in the famous Zeffirelli 1968 film, this play was on my mind quite a lot. So, when I noticed this Manga version on Netgalley, it grabbed my attention immediately. For anyone who may be thinking the dialogue is 'updated' with more modern dialect, you’d be wrong. This is the same script you’d find in the original play- except there are no stage directions. Instead, those are replaced by images, which works out much better than I’d have imagined. The artwork is spectacular, as is the adaptation. Obviously, a great deal of thought went into how to present this classic in Manga form, and I’d say it came off beautifully. Granted, I’m still a novice at this, but I was pleased with the presentation. I did have a few technical issues, since this one is not in Kindle/ MOBI format. I had to use Adobe Edition, which is a pain, and the scrolling was terrible, especially since, of course it’s back to front. Several times my screen jumped to the end of the book and caused a great deal of frustration.Shakespeare is still difficult to read and adjusting to this format made it an even bigger challenge. It took me a good long while to get through it. (If anyone has a suggestion on how to make this less daunting- please feel free to offer me some suggestions.) However, despite the heaviness of the drama, and the extra effort it required to read the book, I was impressed, and enjoyed reading this classic with the well-drawn illustrations and art work which certainly enriched and enhanced my experience.Despite the disdain of melodrama- I liked all the angst between Romeo and Juliet- but not that sad ending! It still makes a great cautionary tale- even after all these years. 4 stars
  • (3/5)
    Like most, I imagine, I was forced to read this in high school (freshman year, specifically). I was no fan of Shakespeare at the time, though I've since come around somewhat. While I've not read it since, I've no real desire to. They're just a couple of horny teenagers thinking they're experiencing true love and all that. For that reason, this work does not entertain me as one might want. However, I do appreciate what it's lent to our culture, and specifically to derivative works. Without this book, we would not have West Side Story, which I do happen to be fond of.
  • (4/5)
    4.25 StarsA fanciful retelling of Romeo and Juliet in Manga format. Emotive artwork and much of the dialogue is in true Shakespeare form. A nice addition to the Manga Classics series. Keep up the good work! For classics and adaptation fans.Net Galley Feedback
  • (3/5)
    I would've given a star for the crazy plot. But then again, that's what makes this unforgettable. The story's crazy. Also, Shakespeare's as smooth as usual, especially in the language of love. I can see why this has become a classic.
  • (3/5)
    Beautiful language, classic Shakespeare.
  • (4/5)
    Ah, my favorite classic.
  • (5/5)
    great classic
  • (5/5)
    As long as you remind yourself that this is teen melodrama and not tragedy the essential vapidity of the central relationship and the frustratingly buried deeper and more complex relationships--actually all Romeo's, with Mercutio but also Benvolio, Tybalt, the priest--don't get in the way of good tawdry enjoyment. Now I think about it, Romeo's like a cryptohomoerotic sixteenth-century Archie.
  • (5/5)
    This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!
  • (5/5)
    It was fun to listen to the narration in character!
  • (5/5)
    Loved this audio. Easy to follow. I especially enjoyed hearing the play done in American accents for something different.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastically performed! Very entertaining, and easily understood. One of if not the best recording I've heard.
  • (4/5)
    I love the idea of a fully dramatised audiobook as it brings the book alive. However, for Shakespeare i think it would be better to use specific accents. Actors speaking in the style/tradition of the Royal Shakespeare Company in England seem to add a certain je ne sais quoi. For me American accents etc do not always compliment Shakespearean plays.
  • (5/5)
    Shakespeare according to "RedBook"A magazine at the dentist's office said romantic relationships can be broken into three categories, based on progressive levels of emotional maturity:The least mature are founded on mutual physical attraction ...basically high school "puppy love". If that's all the relationship has going for it, it is fated to fail. The next step up are relations based on shared interests. These are a little better, because your appearance isn't "you" the way your interests are. Shared interests represent an intellectual connection, and some degree of understanding one another. Still... one's intellect isn't quite at the heart of one's essance. The most mature relationships are based on mutually-held values. A relationship on this level has the best odds of enduring, since the partners' bond comprises not only mutual understanding and respect, but common goals and purpose. I think that may help explain why arranged marriages seem to have such a low divorce rate, even though some of them may lack physical attraction and shared interests. Of course none of these categories are mutally exclusive, so the strongest relationship of all would have all three components.This scheme of classification isn' scientific by any means, but it sounds reasonable, and is supported by some personal experience, so I'm going to use it here.Applying the above to Romeo and Juliet: By the end of Act 1, Romeo and Juliet are firmly in the eye of a Category 1 Love Affair (feel free to use that for your garage band's next song title). The Veronese duo are about to become sacrifices to the cruel god of Physical Attraction. If they have any common interests, we don't know about them. They do have one shared value: family loyalty... but to opposed families, so it works against them. EXTRANEOUS TANGENT (skip this too): What are Romeo's hobbies? A silly question, but can you answer it? He hangs out with his friends- no help there. He does some fencing, but doesn't come across as a fencing buff. An upper-crust kid of those days may well have had fencing imposed on him as part of his eduation. He's just not a three-dimensional character. Same for Juliet, our 16th century Paris Hilton. That's not a knock against Shakespeare; it's partly a limitation of the vehicle: this is a play, not a 1000 page novel. Still... there are plays out there that do wonders with character exploration ([book:Death of a Salesman12898]). The Bard certainly could have fleshed out these characters, if he had wanted to, but it wasn't useful to the story.What we are looking at here is a relationship doomed to fail from within, and a score of outsiders determined to expedite the process. Young lovers, blinded by youth and its attendant hormones, lack the foresight to see their passions will come at too high a cost. Families, blinded by lingering animosity for unnamed past events, cannot restrain themselves to let the relationship run its natural course. In fact, parental interference probably enshrines the affair in a mystique of "forbidden fruit", and unites the paramours in their defiance -a common purpose which alone can not sustain their attachment. Friends on the periphery, like the Friar Lawrence and Mercutio, lack the wisdom to see that aiding and abetting the couple will only hurt them in the long run. You should've known when you saw Shakespeare's name on the cover this was going to be a story about human folly- and those never end well. The romance part was just to suck you in; this is a disaster flick. Everybody in this play suffers some degree of debilitated judgment and is running loose, looking for trouble. To paraphrase my mother "It's all fun-and-games until somebody gets killed." ...which they always do. By Act II, we all know how it will end; the only variable in question is the body count. When Friar Lawrence starts explaining he's got this fabulous new drug that gives the appearance of death, that's the equivalent of the first rivet popping off a wing in mid-flight. When you see that in a movie, it is unthinkable that the disaster it implies will not come to pass.I'm not saying that predictabiity ruins this play. It's a great work, not a Michael Bay film. It's got a solid story, well-told, with characters you'll like, endlessly interesting language, with memorable lines ("All these woes shall serve. For sweet discourses in our time to come."), a bit of comic relief, and even some valuable lessons (kids: don't fuck up your lives; parents: don't fuck up your kids). I just don't want to overstate the scope and nature of Romeo and Juliet's greatness. To put it in perspective: it's a tragedy, but it doesn't explore human suffering the way [book:Of Human Bondage31548] does; it doesn't have the "cringe factor" of [book:Oedipus Rex1554]; and it doesn't intrigue you with uncertainties as only complex characters can ([book:The Brothers Karamazov4934]). Romeo and Juliet is a ride. It's all about the spectacle of catastrophic misjudgment - and that's good enough for five stars.
  • (4/5)
    It was pretty good but some parts were confusing.
  • (5/5)
    The definitive edition of this play for 21st century academics. Weis is an intelligent editor who shows an objective viewpoint when looking at textual cruxes, and really provides a decent overview of the scholarship on the text. Perhaps the introduction doesn't cover the text in a literary analysis sense, but I suppose there are more highschool-oriented texts out there for that. Very good, and - while not perhaps in my Top 5 of the current Arden series - an example of what the Arden editions aspire to be.
  • (3/5)
    Publiekslieveling, maar ik vond het niet altijd overtuigend, soms zelfs stroef. Bevat uiteraard weergaloze passages. Vertaling van Komrij.1595, bekend verhaal, midden XV?, maar wel afstand van moralistische behandeling,exuberante po?zie, evolutie van romantische komedie naar tragedie, maar heel vlot alsof het door Shakespeare zelf niet serieus werd bevonden. Twee stijlen: hoogdraven-mani?ristisch en rijper en sober. Thema is de roekeloze hartstocht; daarom een noodlottragedie: ondergang buiten hun wil om (bij de andere tragedies komt de ondergang door een tekort aan krachten of een gebrek).Huis van Montague tegen het huis van Capulet in Verona. Julia is 14 jaar.Boodschap van de prins tegen geweld I,1 (?Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace?, p 1012); omschrijving liefde I,1 (?Love is a smoke rais?d with the fume of sighs:/Beining purg?d, a fire sparkling in lovers? eyes;/Being vex?d, a sea nourish?d with lovers? tears:/What is it else? A madness most discreet,/A choking gall and a preserving sweet.?, 1013)Hoogtepunt: de dialoog Romeo-Julia II,2 en III,5Vlottere taal dan de vorige, maar toch ook stroeve delen; opvallend korte, komische entractes.
  • (3/5)
    It's okay. And I love the Queen Mab speech. And look, Shakespeare's SHAKESPEARE. Man knows how to write. And I get that it's not a love story and that Shakespeare knows this. Just. Everyone in this story needs to calm down like forty notches. It's histrionic. And I love Catcher in the Rye, so when I say something's histrionic, I mean it.
  • (5/5)
    Teenage Proclivity for Conjugation: "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, J.A. Bryant Jr. Published 1998.

    Upon each re-reading I always wonder why Shakespeare does not reveal the reason that the families hate each other. We are told that the households are alike in dignity (social status). We are even provided with a "spoiler alert" when we learn that the "star crossed lovers" will commit suicide, resulting in a halt to the feuding between the two families. In addition, we receive the clue that the feud has gone on for a long time (ancient grudge) However, the omission of the reason for the feud leaves us wondering and imagining a variety of scenarios--just as Shakespeare must have intended. I think it is important for an author to leave a mystery for the reader to explore. In Star Wars there was a sense of mystery about the Force, what was it. Are there any reasons needed, ever? The humankind's history is filled with feuds which are completely pointless... "Ancient grudge", servants' street fight -- and general desire to feel better than someone else. Isn't this very pointlessness that Shakespeare intended the viewers to see?

    The rest of this review can be read elsewhere.
  • (4/5)
    Note: this is only four stars compared to other Shakespeare. Romeo and Juliet is not the best play he ever wrote, but it is far and away better than almost anything else in the English language.
  • (4/5)
    The play, set in Verona, begins with a street brawl between Montagues and Capulets who are sworn enemies. The Prince of Verona intervenes and declares that further breach of the peace will be punishable by death. Later, Count Paris talks to Capulet about marrying his daughter, but Capulet is wary of the request because Juliet is only thirteen. Capulet asks Paris to wait another two years and invites him to attend a planned Capulet ball. Lady Capulet and Juliet's nurse try to persuade Juliet to accept Paris's courtship.

    Meanwhile, Benvolio talks with his cousin Romeo, Lord Montague's son, about Romeo's recent depression. Benvolio discovers that it stems from unrequited infatuation for a girl named Rosaline, one of Capulet's nieces. Persuaded by Benvolio and Mercutio, Romeo attends the ball at the Capulet house. However, Romeo instead meets and falls in love with Juliet. After the ball, in what is now called the "balcony scene", Romeo sneaks into the Capulet courtyard and overhears Juliet on her balcony vowing her love to him in spite of her family's hatred of the Montagues. Romeo makes himself known to her and they agree to be married. With the help of Friar Laurence, who hopes to reconcile the two families through their children's union, they are secretly married the next day.

    Juliet's cousin Tybalt, incensed that Romeo had sneaked into the Capulet ball, challenges him to a duel. Romeo, now considering Tybalt his kinsman, refuses to fight. Mercutio is offended by Tybalt's insolence, as well as Romeo's "vile submission," and accepts the duel on Romeo's behalf. Mercutio is fatally wounded when Romeo attempts to break up the fight. Grief-stricken and wracked with guilt, Romeo confronts and slays Tybalt.

    Montague argues that Romeo has justly executed Tybalt for the murder of Mercutio. The Prince, now having lost a kinsman in the warring families' feud, exiles Romeo from Verona and declares that if Romeo returns, "that hour is his last." Romeo secretly spends the night in Juliet's chamber, where they consummate their marriage. Capulet, misinterpreting Juliet's grief, agrees to marry her to Count Paris and threatens to disown her when she refuses to become Paris's "joyful bride." When she then pleads for the marriage to be delayed, her mother rejects her.

    Juliet visits Friar Laurence for help, and he offers her a drug that will put her into a death-like coma for "two and forty hours." The Friar promises to send a messenger to inform Romeo of the plan, so that he can rejoin her when she awakens. On the night before the wedding, she takes the drug and, when discovered apparently dead, she is laid in the family crypt.

    The messenger, however, does not reach Romeo and, instead, he learns of Juliet's apparent death from his servant Balthasar. Heartbroken, Romeo buys poison from an apothecary and goes to the Capulet crypt. He encounters Paris who has come to mourn Juliet privately. Believing Romeo to be a vandal, Paris confronts him and, in the ensuing battle, Romeo kills Paris. Still believing Juliet to be dead, he drinks the poison. Juliet then awakens and, finding Romeo dead, stabs herself with his dagger. The feuding families and the Prince meet at the tomb to find all three dead. Friar Laurence recounts the story of the two "star-cross'd lovers". The families are reconciled by their children's deaths and agree to end their violent feud. The play ends with the Prince's elegy for the lovers: "For never was a story of more woe / Than this of Juliet and her Romeo."
  • (2/5)
    READ IN ENGLISH

    I suppose this is an absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been to high school. I read it in my fifth year and actually I really couldn't understand what gave this story it's marvelous reputation.

    May Contain Some Spoilers!

    Maybe it was more normal in those days, as I'm not the slightest a professor when it comes to both English Literature/Plays and English History, but it seems at least a bit weird, to run away and kill yourself over someone you've only just met and everything. Yes, there is of course a lot of drama in it, and presumably it is better to see it on stage than to read it, but I had expected more from this story, as it is so extremely famous!
  • (4/5)
    I like the nurse. I still don't think these dumb kids loved" each other."
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely love this! Romeo can be an idiot sometimes, their families are jerks and the Friar seriously screwed up but you have to love it all.

    Favourite Quote ;

    Oh she doth teach the torches to burn bright, it seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
    As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear, beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.
  • (4/5)
    Ah. The tragic story of Romeo and Juliet. After years and years of hearing what its about, I finally got to read the story for myself. And what a wonderfully tragic story is was. First thing that surprized me was the sexual stuff. Well, I didn't know it was referring to sexual stuff until the teacher pointed it out, but still. I also realised how unrealistic this play is. I mean, two people falling in love at first sight, getting married before the week is over, and dying because of each other is something that I don't see happening in real life. And I'm so glad it doesn't.
  • (5/5)
    This updated Folger's edition is very readable, yet still contains all of the explanatory picture from the previous editions.I sometimes was able to read several pages without referencing the footnotes on the left page. I also thought the suggested books for further reading were helpful, as they highlight major themes of this classic.
  • (2/5)
    I don't get the hype. I find Romeo to be completely annoying and the story is just frustrating. Worse is trying to see modern film adaptations of the same story, where life-or-death lost messages is impossible. I don't see the point in reading this story except to promote cultural literacy (in which case, a plot summary would suffice).
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite writes by William Shakespeare, along with Julius Caesar and The Merchant of Venice. Forbidden love, yet desire to be together. An elaborate plan that would have worked, had one been a little more patient as it pertained to Juliet waking up. The epitome of a romantic tragedy but not without lessons. The main one being that some feuds should be squashed.