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Bird Box: A Novel

Bird Box: A Novel

Scritto da Josh Malerman

Narrato da Cassandra Campbell


Bird Box: A Novel

Scritto da Josh Malerman

Narrato da Cassandra Campbell

valutazioni:
4/5 (538 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 13, 2014
ISBN:
9780062331908
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Nota del redattore

On the screen…

Instead of walking around blindfolded for the “Bird Box” challenge, read the original novel. Josh Malerman’s chilling, apocalyptic debut has been favorably compared to the likes of Stephen King. It’s no wonder the Netflix adaptation starring Sandra Bullock has become such a craze.

Descrizione

Something is out there . . .

Something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.

Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remain, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, Malorie has long dreamed of fleeing to a place where her family might be safe. But the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat—blindfolded—with nothing to rely on but Malorie's wits and the children's trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. And something is following them. But is it man, animal, or monster?

Engulfed in darkness, surrounded by sounds both familiar and frightening, Malorie embarks on a harrowing odyssey—a trip that takes her into an unseen world and back into the past, to the companions who once saved her. Under the guidance of the stalwart Tom, a motley group of strangers banded together against the unseen terror, creating order from the chaos. But when supplies ran low, they were forced to venture outside—and confront the ultimate question: in a world gone mad, who can really be trusted?

Interweaving past and present, Josh Maler-man's breathtaking debut is a horrific and gripping snapshot of a world unraveled that will have you racing to the final minute.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 13, 2014
ISBN:
9780062331908
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Josh Malerman’s literary output began as a young child as he wrote about a space-travelling dog. During his many years spent as lead singer and guitarist for band The High Strung, Josh never stopped writing, until one day, the drafts began to form chilling debut Bird Box, published in 2015. Josh lives in Michigan and tweets at @JoshMalerman.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Bird Box

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    A very suspenseful, scary, and chilling post apocalyptic story of people surviving in a terrifying world that has been invaded with extra terrestrials that drive humans insane if they are looked upon. Survivors must wear blindfolds when outsideand have all windows covered to the point of "blackout" so no beings could possibly look in any window. Many friends and relatives of the survivors have already gone insane and killed themselves or killed others. To begin the story, the main character, Mallory, and her sister who live together listen to the news about the strange suicide deaths all over the world until the stations quit broadcasting and Mallory finds her sister has committed suicide. Mallory has just discovered that she is pregnant. However, she comes across an add in the news paper offering a safe house that is opening it's doors to people before it is too late. Mallory sets off with a blindfold to find the house. When she does, the people there take her in. She finds some refuge until suspicions take hold of her by the throat. One more person, a man, comes knocking on the door and needs sanctuary just like she did............ A truly frightening book that makes you realize just how dark the world could get as described in the Book of Revelation. Mallory has been influenced by the hope and determination of some of her roommates which drives the story to it's conclusion. The book has been made into a movie on Netflix and stars Sandra Bullock .
  • (3/5)
    Quick, decent read.

    In terms of "not seeing" novels, I prefer Blindness for Saramago's prose.
  • (4/5)
    This was a short book, but it packs a punch. There were several points where I realized I was physically leaning forward while reading because I was so on edge about what would happen next. Josh Malerman does a great job of conveying the isolation and claustrophobia of a world where simply opening your eyes can lead to madness and suicide, and what that would do to your choices as a person and as a mother. The subtle elements that convey this world is both like ours and not like ours often pay off in unexpected ways (instead of names, Malorie calls her children Boy and Girl). I haven’t yet seen the Netflix movie, but if it does half as good a job of building tension and suspense as the novel does, I’m definitely going to be sleeping with the lights on that night.
  • (5/5)
    The post-apocalypse genre saturates so much of pop culture these days that I try my best to avoid it whenever I can. Color me surprised when I picked up Josh Malerman’s Bird Box, expecting more of the same, and discovered that post-apocalyptic novels are not quite dead yet. Malerman’s debut tells the story of Malorie, Boy, and Girl, an unconventional family living in a world where using one’s sight has become dangerous, and too often leads to horrific acts of violence, murder, and eventually, suicide. The novel shifts between past and present, providing glimpses into Malorie’s life before and after the world started to unravel.

    Malerman provides just the right amount of background information to compel the reader from the very start. He also withholds information brilliantly, as he establishes the haunting atmosphere, pulls you into the mystery behind the sudden acts of violence, and then leaves you wondering who or what could be causing so much chaos and death. The time shifts are also written in such a way that the reader is aware of an absence or is wary of a character, but they don’t yet know why. Putting the pieces together will become a desperate need, but Malerman only gives out information when he feels it is the right time. The anticipation is a killer.

    Malorie desperately attempts to bond to her children in the present and her housemates in the past, but struggles immensely, as she has already lost so much and cannot fathom more death and isolation. While her thoughts dominate much of the narrative, important deviations to the minds of the other members of the household emphasize their similarities and differences. Everyone in the house has seen terrible things and they all have a common motivation, but they want to approach the solution in different ways. This tension and distrust causes much of the conflict in the house, and often makes the reader wonder whether living in the house is as safe as everyone seems to think.

    What makes Bird Box so unique is that it relies heavily on the reader’s imagination. The people in the house must use blindfolds whenever they venture outdoors to fetch water or to make a supply run. Hearing, touch, and smell become imperative to their survival, and when strange objects, sounds, or odors appear, the mind jumps to the worst conclusions. Large portions of the novel focus on journeys outdoors, and these sections are the most nerve-wracking of all. Nobody knows what lurks around the corner, and most of the time, they will never find out.

    Such a fast-paced and unpredictable novel begs for a marathon read. Bird Box by Josh Malerman will make you question your sanity and redefine your sense of humanity. It may also give you nightmares for weeks to come. In other words, it’s the perfect Halloween read.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! I haven't flown through a book this quickly in a long time. I picked this up about three, maybe four days ago, and I just finished tonight. (For me, that's pretty fast.) I'd seen a few things about the movie, but as it was on Netflix, I wasn't able to watch it. I'm so glad I read the book. This is an edge-of-your-seat, who-can-you-trust kind of book!!! I LOVE that the protagonist is a woman and a mother! This book had me mildly frightened most of the time, and at times I was exclaiming out loud in fear! Loved it!!!!!
  • (4/5)
    Spoilers: A horror/post-apocalypse hybrid and the author's first novel, intensely creepy and an absolute page-turner in the best sense of the word. The underlying phenomenon is never explained as it would be if it were Science Fiction, but it's grounded by a hugely sympathetic progagonist. It alternates between real time and flashbacks, and during the parts of the book that take place outside with the characters blindfolded, it becomes almost hallucinatory, with the author having to describe things without visual imagery. There's only one really hardcore shock, but it's as doozy. Doesn't read like somebody's first book, it's very sure-handed, fully realized and well written. The Special Edition includes a short story set in the same world, turning the concept inside out by getting into the head of an actual victim. A great read, whichever genre you're a fan of.
  • (4/5)
    The author is a master at tension building, which made this a very hard to put down book.I read it in two sittings and never got bored with it once.
  • (4/5)
    As it says on the cover, "Don't Open Your Eyes"! And you damn well better listen!I really liked the movie, and this book, as per usual, is better! It's much more realistic, and gets in to more survival details and makes the whole story a little more believable. Malorie is awesome, and Boy and Girl are pretty kickin' too! If you like the movie, you'll like this read. And if you haven't seen the movie, read this first!
  • (4/5)
    From goodreads
    Most people ignored the outrageous reports on the news. But they became too frequent, they became too real. And soon, they began happening down the street. Then the Internet died. The television and radio went silent. The phones stopped ringing. And we couldn't look outside anymore. Malorie raises the children the only way she can; indoors. The house is quiet. The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows. They are out there. She might let them in. The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall. Soon she will have to wake them. Soon she will have to blindfold them. Today they must leave the house. Today they will risk everything.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. So well-written, riveting, and completely terrifying. I still have questions and would love a sequel.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great book. It put you in the verge and it makes you imagine something different each time. I really like the ending, was quite unexpected. Is a perfect reading for october... Rainy day when you are not sure what is out....
  • (5/5)
    What can I say about this book? It was a different genre for me and it held my attention, I needed to know what was out there.I can't imagine having to live like these people, can't imagine doing what they had to do - I honestly don't think I could've done it.This book is pure suspense. I love suspense. I did have questions at the end of the book but I believe they are all natural questions evolving from the unnatural way of life that I can't comprehend.
  • (3/5)
    If you lay eyes on the creature it makes the viewer go insane and kill themselves. This is the world Malorie lives in now, the story is told in two time periods, when this first outbreaks and she is pregnant living in a house with survivors and 4 years later when all who is left are her two kids trying to find a safe place with other people. In both time periods, they must avoid looking outside or else risk seeing a creature, this means windows are covered and if they go outside they are blindfolded. Not knowing what the creatures are and the characters having to navigate around blindly, not knowing what is near them, watching them, creates a creepy mood to the book that makes it enjoyable and wanting to know what happens next kept me hooked. The writing isn't the best and there are a lot of loose ends, which was expected.
  • (5/5)
    Bird Box is good. Bird Box is excellent. Bird Box is a wonderful thriller that I recommend to horror and suspense readers alike. There is a plethora of adjectives I could put here in this (bird) box, but the book is short enough for you to create your own.
  • (5/5)
    The scariest part of this novel is the fact that you never find out what exactly it is that people see that causes them to become suicidal. The author leaves the "creature" to the reader's imagination, so we can each create our own perfectly scary horror monster. The story goes between different periods of time, and I really felt that the author did a great job with that. There is a part in the story when it becomes unclear what is the present and what is the past, and it was such a cool effect that it made me like this novel even more (that's all the details you get!). The concept for this novel was really good and it was executed well, so I was very pleased with this story. A word of warning: this is a very open-ended story; the author doesn't give too much and a lot of the descriptions are things your imagination has to put in. While I enjoyed that aspect, I know there may be readers who would prefer more details. Overall, a great horror story that really did justice to the genre!
  • (5/5)
    Wow! What a story! I listened to the audiobook of this and it was an awesome listen. In this book the world has changed. It's no longer safe to open your eyes and there are monsters out and about. The story of Mallory trying to survive in this new world is eerie and provoking. This book is one of the creepiest books I've read in a while. Loved it!
  • (5/5)
    If you're looking for something that is fast-paced and just might give you an anxiety attack, Josh Malerman's debut novel Bird Box may be exactly what you need. Set in the very near future, Bird Box is a book that simultaneously takes place during and after the apocalypse. Human beings find their minds under assault by an unseen force, one that drives them toward homicidal and suicidal tendencies. The only way to remain safe is to never, ever open your eyes.

    Imagine with me what living in a world, robbed suddenly of sight, might be like. We rely heavily on our senses and, as an avid reader, I highly value my ability to be able to see the written word. I can't even begin to fathom what it would be like to find myself forced into an eternally dark void, and never have I thought of a scenario in which I would choose to be blind.

    In Bird Box, Malorie and her children aren't given that option. Stranded in a home that is not her own, and faced with dwindling supplies and a lack of social interaction with anyone but her two children, Malorie must embark on a dangerous mission to find a new, safer haven for her small family: only their destination isn't very close to them, and they are not alone. There's a fourth party traveling with them and they are helpless to identify the newcomer.

    The entire story does not follow that journey alone, though. In fact, it simultaneously takes place prior to Malorie's endeavor, introducing us to an entire cast of characters ranging from lovable to untrustworthy; from the purely innocent to those whose madness goes beyond all help. Though I'm not a huge fan of the constant back and forth chronology (in fact, I find it to be extremely distracting), the manner in which Malerman reveals bits and pieces of his story is crucial to progression: it gives readers the opportunity to develop their own feelings for Malorie and how she handles her problems. I also found that the odd way in which he split the story kept me reading, if only because more often that not, I found myself wondering how or why something was the way it was presently if, at the beginning of the end, everything seemed to be headed in a totally different direction.

    Like most stories that take place after the world as we know it has met its doom, whether by nuclear fallout, bio-warfare, or the collapse of government, Bird Box brings out the best, and more readily, the worst in people. They become desperate or panicked, sometimes to the point that their actions defy all logic: such as the voluntary or involuntary blinding of oneself to avoid madness. Perhaps I so easily love post-apocalyptic books for that reason alone. They have a habit of reminding us exactly how pathetic and disgusting our own race can be; how often we are willing to put ourselves first, despite the suffering of others, should the situation call for it.
  • (4/5)
    Bird Box tells the story Mallorie, a young mother who has not looked outside of her home in more than four years due to her fear of the unknown creatures that make anyone who sees them go insane. Flashing between the time when Mallorie first discovers she is pregnant while the epidemic seems far away and Mallorie is living with a group of people who share a common goal, and over four years later while Mallorie and her children attempt to escape their home in hopes of finding somewhere safer, Bird Box builds its tension slowly and lets you simmer in your questions; what is making these people go insane, and why are Mallorie and her children now completely alone? The story itself is beautifully told, and builds incredible imagery throughout the novel. I particularly enjoyed the flashbacks between the two points in time. Knowing that Mallorie ends up alone leads to incredible suspense each time a new character is introduced or whenever the group attempts a riskier maneuver, leaving you wondering, is this it? Is this how they die? Josh Malerman also did a great job of showing the trajectory of the epidemic, starting from the beginning when reports of people going insane and killing themselves are countries away, up until people that Mallorie herself knows and cares for begin to suffer from the affliction themselves. Because of the nature of the story, I think that Bird Box benefits from its audio form. The novel contains detailed descriptions of how the world outside feels and sounds, as whenever the characters go outside they are blindfolded. Hearing the words spoken aloud provides an interesting perspective- rather than seeing these descriptions for yourself, you are hearing them described to you. And because this book is so descriptive, being able to close your eyes and visualize the story unfolding adds an extra layer onto the story (and gives you a small idea of what it may be like to be a character in this world).This book is dark; many of the characters have suffered from extreme tragedies prior to the part of their story told in Bird Box, and most suffer more while we are with them. However, if you are in the mood for another great apocalyptic thriller, I encourage you to give this one a try!My rating: 4/5 stars. This book reminded me a lot of The Fireman by Joe Hill, so if you are looking for a read-a-like this one may be for you!
  • (4/5)
    Samarago's Blindness meets Day of the Triffids with a dash of The last Man - not to imply that it's derivative, I agree that it is very good and engaging. But it's pretty firmly in the horror category for me - there no sfnal explanation is even proposed, let alone resolved, for what has been going on, and the mechanisms used by the evil forces to wreak evil seem a bit magical to me.
  • (3/5)
    If you lay eyes on the creature it makes the viewer go insane and kill themselves. This is the world Malorie lives in now, the story is told in two time periods, when this first outbreaks and she is pregnant living in a house with survivors and 4 years later when all who is left are her two kids trying to find a safe place with other people. In both time periods, they must avoid looking outside or else risk seeing a creature, this means windows are covered and if they go outside they are blindfolded. Not knowing what the creatures are and the characters having to navigate around blindly, not knowing what is near them, watching them, creates a creepy mood to the book that makes it enjoyable and wanting to know what happens next kept me hooked. The writing isn't the best and there are a lot of loose ends, which was expected.
  • (1/5)
    The description seemed so promising when I first read it. Then I started reading the book and everything fell apart. It started in the first few paragraphs. I had trouble classifying this book (which is a mixed positive for me.) It starts sounding like it's a literary fiction type book, then offers a thriller/suspense/mystery type, then suggests it's a science fiction type thing. It's all very confusing. The whole thing with not looking is not well done, as the author doesn't do as well just describing sounds. He has to describe as if seen. It's also made worse when the writer proves he's never actually been IN a rowboat. She places the girl in back. The boy sits up front. Yet when she stops rowing, she leans forward to touch the boy then backward to touch the girl. Which would be wrong. And what's with calling the kids Girl and Boy? Too lazy to give them names throughout the book?I don't mind frame stories, but this jumping back and forth between memories and present day is just annoying to me. It breaks up the time line too much. And once the characters are on the river, there's a monotony to the whole story that just kills any suspense or momentum the writer might have built. There's no forward motion. The characters are stuck in a time loop. I feel proud to have made it more than half way through the book. I think I'm going to give up and label it a dud.
  • (4/5)
    This is a story about what happens when the world goes violently insane, and just like a Shirley Jackson story, Bird Box kept me riveted. So it was no surprise to find out that Josh Malerman's novel was a 2014 Shirley Jackson Award Nominee.

    The story is told by Malorie by going back and forth between her and her two children's present situation and Malorie's past in which you find out how they got to the point of trying to row down a river blindfolded. This construction is why the book sucked me in and kept me listening. Not only did I want to know what would happen to Malorie and the children, but I wanted to know even more how it all happened and why Malorie is the way she is. There were so many questions I wanted answered that I got through the book in a matter of days.

    Has this story been done before? Yes, as is the case with most Post-Apocalyptic novels. However, never once did I feel the story was contrived or overdone. Instead, it was a refreshing take on the subgenre that didn't, for once, involve zombies or The Stand style super-virus. I also appreciated that we never really know what the monster is or looks like, where it came from, or why everyone is driven to extreme violence after seeing them. To me, that's realistic and horrifying. Aren't we often more afraid of what we don't know than what we do know? I recommend Bird Box to anyone who loves Horror and Suspense, Post-Apocalyptic stories, and fans of Shirley Jackson.
  • (4/5)
    Not a book for reading alone in the dark. Something is infecting the world and you get infected by seeing it, turning you homicidal and suicidal. To survive, you must close your eyes an keep them closed. Maybe, in a small space that you have cleared, you can dare to open your eyes in a small space.Mallory faces this new reality. It's scary not knowing what is out there or around you when you can't see.The narration of the audiobook is very good.
  • (4/5)
    Suddenly, people who see mysterious creatures turn violent and attack one another or themselves, so everyone who survives must barricade themselves indoors and not open their eyes outside.First of all, the premise for this book is ridiculous. Malerman handles this by not making the story at all about the "creatures" but instead about the effects of having to avoid seeing them. Also, this is a horror story, not a survival story, so Malerman glosses over the niceties of staying alive in such an environment. As a result, he keeps the tension high and the pace quick, with several genuinely creepy moments, and the story works on that level as long as the reader doesn't get overly concerned about the details. Not deep, but a nice, creepy little read.
  • (4/5)
    A very strange book, that crept into my dreams. Glad I read it, it was impressive to see how determined a mother can be to save her children no matter how bad the world becomes.
  • (5/5)
    How do you survive in a dangerous world you cannot see? Welcome to a postapocalyptic world where you simply cannot open your eyes. Those who do eventually see a "creature" which causes them to go mad, violently attacking their loved ones and strangers and killing themselves. Few survivors exist several months after the first creatures are spotted, and those who do, must cover all the windows and blindfold themselves if they go outside. Malorie is several months pregnant when she first seeks refuge with a group of survivors in an abandoned home. In opposing chapters, Malorie is now raising her two four year old children in isolation, trying to move them to an unknown location 40 miles away. What happens in between is very suspenseful, as it is not clear how Malorie ends up by herself with the children and if she will eventually see the creatures that threaten their lives.This is a terrifying and suspenseful thriller, where the enemy is unknown but death is only moments away at any given point. I can't believe I waited so long to read this book. If I were you, I would download it immediately.
  • (5/5)
    This is the first book, in my entire reading experience, that I went so far into the chapters in one sitting. Yes, even more so than I did for the Harry Potter series. (Then again, HP had waaay more pages than this, so...)
    Anyways, I can always tell the quality of a thriller/horror story by how easily other (regular) sounds in my room are able to make me jump while reading. In this case, my text message tone made me very literally jump out of my skin at one point of reading. At the back of the book, Hugh Howey says that the book 'demands to be read in a single sitting', and I couldn't agree more. Had I more hours when I first started the book, I'd have probably finished it in one sitting.
    The only thing that I was a bit disappointed with about this book was that it was not revealed what the 'creature' was, or why people went mad and killed themselves when they saw it. I had been dying to know what it was, and why it had the reaction it had to people, and even animals. Other than that, this book has brilliant creep and suspense factor.
    Now allow me to excuse myself as I search to find out if there were any Easter Eggs that I had failed to notice in the book, or if I had been that dumb to not catch on about what kind of 'creatures' these things are.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't quite realize I was picking up another dystopian novel when I started this one. Seems I've read more than my fair share of them this year. But this one is not only depressing but downright creepy. Imagine a world in which people suddenly begin going mad, usually resulting in suicide. No one knows exactly what causes this madness, other than the fact that it happens after seeing something or someone. Thus, the small population that remains does so by keeping their eyes closed or blindfolding themselves so as not to risk seeing whatever it is that's out there.I'm not sure I'd classify this as horror, because it's not horror in the traditional sense. But it's creepy. The beauty of this book is that it invokes paranoia in the reader by taking away the sense of sight. Without sight, the imagination runs wild. With the exception of some less-than-realistic scenes near the end of the book, the story is for the most part unique and well-written, although it does leave the reader with some unanswered questions. I listened on audio and was on the edge of my seat for a majority of the second half of the book, not wanting to get out of the car. If you're up for a disturbing and thought-provoking book that will stick with you for a while, this one will fit the bill.
  • (4/5)
    If you open your eyes and see it, you become deadly violent. Towards yourself and whoever is around you. No one knows what it is that you see because you don't stay sane long enough to tell anyone. A samll group of survivors have banded together in a house. They board up the windows and blindfold themselves before going out to the well to get water. There are two pregnant women in the house also. The story is told between the present of one woman trying to get two children to possible safety down the river (while blindfolded) and the past of the survivor's story.I thought this was very clever, but was completely unsatisfied by the ending.
  • (5/5)
    What happened? Almost everyone in the world is dead. Dead because of SOMETHING they saw outside. SOMETHING that drives humans and animals insane. Now Malorie is alone in an abandoned house with two children, waiting for the time when she and the kids can escape to a safer place. But how will they escape when they can't open their eyes outdoors? The children have never been outside the house without their blindfolds, and neither has Malorie for five long years.But today is the today Malorie and the children will put on their blindfolds and go outdoors to take their long and hazardous journey towards an unknown future. And the SOMETHING is still out there, waiting for them....This is the perfectly creepy scenario that Josh Malerman gives us in Bird Box, a novel that's high on suspense and relatively light on gore. Bird Box has all the atmosphere and tension of an old-fashioned black-and-white horror film, and never fails to surprise and shock from the first to the last page. Highly recommended!