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Prince Caspian

Prince Caspian

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Lynn Redgrave


Prince Caspian

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Lynn Redgrave

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (320 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
4 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854423
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Narnia ... the land between the lamp-post and the Castle of Cair Paravel, where animals talk, where magical things happen ... and where the adventure begins.

Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy are returning to boarding school when they are summoned from the dreary train station (by Susan's own magic horn) to return to the land of Narnia -- the land where they had ruled as kings and queens and where their help is desperately needed.

Performed by Lynn Redgrave

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854423
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.

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4.5
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    If I recall, Prince Caspian might have been the driest of the chronicles. I sure hope I remember right, because this was a dull read. As a child I enjoyed it, but I devoured all the Narnia books in short order. My children enjoyed the book well enough and frankly, they managed to make the movie worse (we watched it after reading). I know Lewis wrote so much of his work as allegories and Caspian is no different, but I just didn't have the focus for that with answering my six-year-old's constant questions about words she wasn't familiar with. We're on to the Voyage of the Dawn Treader!
  • (4/5)
    This is the fourth book in the Chronicles of Narnia series. I think so far this has been my least favorite one. I actually preferred the movie over the book. I didn't feel a whole lot happened in this book, even though a lot did happen. Not my favorite, but not horrible.
  • (2/5)
    This is my least favorite in the Chronicles of Narnia series. The only reason I reason it is to get the background for the characters in the Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the next book in the series. It doesn't have much going on, and very little of the story even has anything to do with the Pevensie kids from the Lion, the Witch, & the Wardrobe. If you have never read the entire series, I recommend still reading this book once.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good adventure. I like that Edmond is the 1st to put faith in Lucy when she claims to have seen Aslan. I found my self really disliking Susan.
  • (5/5)
    This is the third book in the Chronicles of Narnia. In this book the four children from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe find themselves tugged back into Narnia. A state of civil war has been declared, all the animals, trees and dwarfs have been banished, and Prince Caspian is desperately trying to regain his throne.
  • (3/5)
    Good stuff.
  • (5/5)
    Meet Prince Caspian, a boy who has become intrigued in stories of Old Narnia from his nurse. Where beasts can run and talk freely. He lives in the royal castle, where the current king strictly forbids talk about Old Narnia from the kingdoms backstory. The four Penvensies are transported to Narnia once again by Susan's own magic horn. It turns out that the beasts and men are in war, and the children are needed to help. Will the great land of Talking Beasts be restored to its glory? Or will the cruel men stay in reign? Read and find out. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, as fantasy being my favorite genre and the four children we're back. I was fine with Shasta in the last book, but it is definetly good to have the original children back. I reccomend this book to everyone, as it was a great read and i couldn't put it down.
  • (3/5)
    I was glad the story brought back Lucy and co. Prince Caspian was mildly interesting I suppose, if only because he rediscovered the magical creatures of Narnia. He was so flat though, like most of the characters in the series so far. His personality seemed to be "kind" and "innocent". The dwarves were more interesting, and some of the animals, though it was hard to hear their names listening to the audio. I found myself annoyed whenever the narrator was talking about Minkycheeps or whatever the sword-fighting mouse was called. There's something about this series that is just too simple for me. I often enjoy middle-grade, but I'm thinking I would have liked these books more if I'd read them when I was around 12 or so. They feel sort of like old fairy-tales: bare-bones characters and a simple plot, with many of enriching details left out.
  • (4/5)
    Another re-read, obviously. A bedtime story book for Jefferson. I'd forgotten how excessively pagan this one is. My favorite part was probably re-reading Reepicheep's story -- he's kind of an icon for Smarter Every Day -- appearing at the end of each video -- and I could only just barely remember him.

    Hardest part of reading aloud was definitely trying to differentiate the voices of the dwarves and the badger, who were all described to have deep, earthy voices. Otherwise, this series continues to be delightful for reading out loud.
  • (5/5)
    It was great to see the Pevensies back again for Prince Caspian. Caspian is a great character and combining him with Peter was interesting to say the least.
  • (4/5)
    This book was good, as I would expect from Mr. Lewis, but I found it to be much less impressive than the previous three Narnia books. The plot isn't too thrilling or surprising, and the characters are all rather plain, except for Reepicheep, the brave and slightly arrogant mouse. Maybe it was because I was tired when I read this, but this book seemed very much like a typical sequel--an imitation of the original, lacking its luster and fire. But when you imitate a great work, the result is still worth checking out.--J.
  • (3/5)
    Prince Caspian (the character) isn't very interesting—since he is pretty sympathetic in the beginning he never takes the Lewis-ish journey from jerk to king. But there are battles, Old Narnians, bacchanalias, and Aslan turning kids into pigs, and that makes up for Caspian somewhat.
  • (4/5)
    Out of all the scenes in this book, the one that stands out to me is when the Pevensies realize where they are. I've always loved that scene without ever being able to place exactly why. This isn't my favorite book, because so much of it is back story, but it does have some of my favorite moments: Edmund's electric torch, Peter dueling Miraz, and Susan and Lucy's adventure with Aslan.
  • (3/5)
    Prince Caspian wasn't as good as the first book in the Narnia series. It was a little slow in parts, and the resolution was even simpler than in the previous book. However, it was still enjoyable most of the way through.
  • (3/5)
    The really fun bits, down to Edmund suddenly realizing he left his flashlight in Narnia, mix uneasily with the awkward and nauseating bits. It's suspicious how the girls are always segregated from the boys in some special Aslan interaction in which they don't actually do much. And, as usual, Aslan presents the same problem an omnipotent god presents: why doesn't he do something if he's so powerful? Also, the special importance given to human beings when there are plenty of perfectly good Badgers and Beavers around makes no sense.Although it is only a year after the children were evacuated to the country there is no mention of the war at all.The High King's challenge to Miraz is well-written.
  • (4/5)
    Probably the first sequel I ever read. I remember the excitement of reading about characters of whom I thought I'd never hear again. The christian allegory is not present here (to my knowledge) and it was nice that so much changed after the first book. Good stuff.
  • (3/5)
    I have some issues with Aslan. Sure, he's great when he's around, but you're never certain of his help till the last possible second. Too much majestic roaring, too little explanation of his plans.
  • (4/5)
    We go back to Narnia, to rescue the Country from the evil neighbours. Our original family group has to make some changes, and we get some idea of aging, which isn't usually dealt with in this genre. Not my favourite, but a necessary part of the canon.
  • (3/5)
    Not as overtly Christian or misogynistic as it's predecessor. Though women are still portrayed as the weakest links...
  • (3/5)
    Missed these when I was younger.
    Catching up on some 'classics' - started with this so I could watch the movie.
    Good reading.
    Read in 2006
  • (5/5)
    This book would be good to use when talking about fighting for what is right even against the odds. I think students will like this book because the main character is relatable and the fantasy creatures are intriguing.
  • (4/5)
    Just don't remember this one very much. But then, I don't particularly like power struggles and questions of lineage. Still, of course one can't skip it, or even rate it differently, imo.
  • (2/5)
    Read as the second Narnia book - although I see it is the fourth book in other orderings. Still not Tolkien.Read in Samoa Nov 2002
  • (4/5)
    I read this series years ago, twice, in two different orders. Saw the BBC production too. Beautiful stories. Now my 8 yr old daughter is reading the Chronicles. She is currently reading Prince Caspian.
  • (4/5)
    While the Chronicles of Narnia don't get me going like other works (such as those by his good friend J.R.R. Tolkien), I did like the spirit of Prince Caspian himself. I probably liked it more at the time I read it, given that I was a lot younger.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book it is the stones of Narnia’s history
  • (5/5)
    "There were once four children who's names were Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy..." is the beginning of the best story in the world! If you have not read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, please read it first! You need it for most of this story to make sense. This has been my favorite story /series since I was 6 years old (I'm 25 now)! I read it to my nieces and nephews (3-8) and they love it too! I recomend Narnia to everyone!
  • (5/5)
    This is a grate book I loved it. It’s a lot of fun
  • (2/5)
    This novel in the Narnia series did not particularly do it for me. It seemed a bit forced, stoic, and unmoving. For this reason, I am not giving it a high rating.2 stars.
  • (4/5)
    2003, Harper Audio, Read by Lynn RedgravePrince Caspian begins and ends at a British railway station where the Penvensie children are waiting to return to school. Whisked once again into the land of Narnia, they land on a beautiful beach near an old, ruined castle, which they determine to be Cair Paravel, where they once reigned as Kings and Queens. Although the children are only one year older than they were in their last Narnian adventure, centuries have passed in the magical world.King Miraz has usurped the throne of Prince Caspian, its rightful heir. Aided by a talking badger, Trufflehunter, two dwarves, Nikabrik and Trumpkin, the inimitable mouse, Reepicheep, and, of course, the magnificent Aslan, the children engage in battle on behalf of Prince Caspian.Favourite Memories:I absolutely loved Reepicheep! I was saddened to learn that Peter and Susan, by the conclusion of the novel, are too old to return to Narnia – this reminded me fondly of a moment in my own childhood when my dad explained that there are some doors in life through which only little people can pass.Recommended: Absolutely, highly! These audio versions are fabulously done.