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The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

Scritto da Atul Gawande

Narrato da John Bedford Lloyd


The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

Scritto da Atul Gawande

Narrato da John Bedford Lloyd

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (203 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 ore
Pubblicato:
Dec 22, 2009
ISBN:
9781427208996
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The New York Times bestselling author of Better and Complications reveals the surprising power of the ordinary checklist.

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies—neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist.

First introduced decades ago by the U.S. Air Force, checklists have enabled pilots to fly aircraft of mind-boggling sophistication. Now innovative checklists are being adopted in hospitals around the world, helping doctors and nurses respond to everything from flu epidemics to avalanches. Even in the immensely complex world of surgery, a simple ninety-second variant has cut the rate of fatalities by more than a third.

In riveting stories, Gawande takes us from Austria, where an emergency checklist saved a drowning victim who had spent half an hour underwater, to Michigan, where a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection. He explains how checklists actually work to prompt striking and immediate improvements. And he follows the checklist revolution into fields well beyond medicine, from homeland security to investment banking, skyscraper construction, and businesses of all kinds.

An intellectual adventure in which lives are lost and saved and one simple idea makes a tremendous difference, The Checklist Manifesto is essential reading for anyone working to get things right.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Pubblicato:
Dec 22, 2009
ISBN:
9781427208996
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Atul Gawande is the author of four bestselling books: Complications, a finalist for the National Book Award; Better; The Checklist Manifesto, and Being Mortal. He is also a surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, a staff writer for The New Yorker, and a professor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. He has won the Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science, a MacArthur Fellowship, and two National Magazine Awards. In his work in public health, he is Founder and Chair of Ariadne Labs, a joint center for health systems innovation, and Lifebox, a nonprofit organization making surgery safer globally. He is also chair of Haven, where he was CEO from 2018-2020. He and his wife have three children and live in Newton, Massachusetts.

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203 valutazioni / 53 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Great examples across multiple industries about how using checklists can avert failure.
  • (5/5)
    Great insight on why checklists are such a wonderful tool in our lives!! I’m convinced!!:)
  • (5/5)
    Very well written and narrated. Worth the time to listen.
    Recommend!!
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed the stories and the action steps needed to create a practical and efficient check off list.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent book with a compelling set of arguments. However, the point is made by chapter 2 or 3. After this, it adds context but seems more like it could have been a long journal article instead of a book. 4 stars for the solid concept and references though
  • (5/5)
    Great read with lots of real stories that keep you engaged! Tons of wise words that make me want to implement checklists into my own field. Highly recommend for any profession!!
  • (4/5)
    Great book, In showing how using a checklist can make the difference between success and failure. Must be on every entrpreneur reading list
  • (3/5)
    The book could have been condensed. Basically, it's important to have a checklist as it will prevent major errors from happening.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Thought this might be a bit dry but it was interesting. Anyone interested in process analysis, process control or systems management should read this book.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    A quick read, and a bit repetitive, especially in style, I still give it 4 stars. I got a little teary-eyed reading how the checklists Gawande used in his hospital saved a patient's life. Gawande's frustration that professionals in most fields - aviation excepted - spurn checklists as anti-heroic is valid. Great book.
  • (5/5)
    Not as helpful as Gawande's previous books - especially Better which improved my business quite a bit with the injunction 'count something' (so we did, everything, and saw the patters). However the stories of aircraft and flying and the medical ones were very interesting. Recommended for people who are allergic to self-help books (me) but work in a complex industry and for Gawande fans (me again).
  • (2/5)
    Definitely a book geared to those working in the higher levels of the medical field (surgeons, heads of departments) to show how important a simple thing like a checklist can be to keep the complexity of modern medicine from overtaking our ability to help patients. There are many examples from the medical field, and I thought the book had too many of them, and the ones in the beginning included way too many details. Also, the author had a tendency to mention five or seven things that could be included in a set, rather than the usual three or four, and continuing to do that irked me so that I was fastforwarding a lot in the first few chapters. Once the third chapter started things got better, perhaps because the author wasn't talking about medicine or surgery, and didn't include as many details. I liked that the book mentioned examples of using checklists in building and finance in addition to surgery and aviation... but it would have immediately gotten another star if he had projected how to use checklists in other professions that he mentioned frequently - law and teaching. Part of me wished I had read a paperback, so as to skim the parts that I had to fastforward on the CD, but then no time was wasted - I cleaned the house and drove while listening, so the CD was probably better.
  • (5/5)
    Fascinating. Gawande is just a great writer, to start with, connects practice and theory really well. Walks through the problem of medical errors, especially in surgery, and then connects it to other fields handling complex decision-making: flying and construction in particular. I want to put this stuff to work in my professional and personal life.

    [ed, 4/2/2011: I realized on Friday that I already do some of this. I was updating Drupal on my work site, and I have a very clear checklist that I've refined over the last year, so that I don't leave out any crucial steps. I often find that I would have forgotten something, either in back up or in the actual order of updating, too! Checklists FTW.]
  • (5/5)
    My first words upon finishing this book were in reaction to Dr. Gawande's story about a surgery he performed. I felt that he was so brave in sharing that story. However, let first things be first. If you think reading about why a checklist is important might be silly, you're wrong. This book is a convincing and intelligent argument favoring how checklists work to decrease errors. Dr. Gawande's book also examines other theories which assist in creating better than expected outcomes of unexpected or emergency situations. Contrary to what may seem a simple answer, having an expert give directions, the proven better option is to have participants in a project communicate among themselves to formulate the best resolution. Taken together, a checklist plus a team of interested and communicating individuals have proven to decrease errors in many professions. It might be worthwhile for all of us to give "the checklist" much more credit. I so much enjoyed reading this book. I easily applied it to the environment in which I work as a quality auditor. I began using checklists for myself after my tasks became increasingly lengthy and complicated. My manager uses weekly meetings for our team of five to discuss problems and, together, decide the best resolutions. The next step in my personal checklist for this book is to pass it along to my manager just so she can she what she's been doing right!
  • (4/5)
    The author takes an interesting journey through the development of checklists in medicine, commercial aircraft flight, and building construction. My thoughts about checklists before reading the book was that they needed to be comprehensive lists of tasks that are used to turn off your brain and make outcomes more consistent. Dr. Gawande, though, leads us through the development of a World Health Organization checklist for reducing surgery complications. At first, the developers try to make a comprehensive list of tasks, but in practice it is viewed as unwieldy and unusable. We then learn that checklists are best used as points to synchronize communication and prompt for the most important and most often overlooked tasks.Read this book through to the end. If you get half way and you think it is slowing and starting to repeat itself, keep going...there are more insights to be gained by reading through the whole book.
  • (4/5)
    A very simple idea illustrated with some decent anecdotes. Gawande presents a convincing case for the checklist as an answer to the increasing complexity of fields such as medicine, engineering and finance.
  • (4/5)
    Intriguing research and well-written. I learned a lot. It does feel a little long by the end, however.
  • (4/5)
    my notes/lessons from the book:* the value of checklists* even intelligent and experienced people forget small obvious things sometimes (naturally); checklists can prevent this and allow you to focus in the things that require more thinking* the importance of decenralizing power when tasks are complex* what makes a good list; i.e. not including everything* reminder that most knowledge and experience exists, just isn't known or utilized* systems thinking is often missed... as only a systems thinker would think to think of it (others are specialized/boxed)* a checklist can be a good place to include verifications that contingency solutions are available
  • (2/5)
    Atul Gawande has knack of writing good medical narraitves and those are only parts which carry this book. Premise - that checklists are useful in all kind of complex tasks - isn't bad but there only so much one can write on such a simple subject. Author does a good job of it and it's a light easy read. However from the idea point of view, well, a paragraph would have sufficed. Rest is mere evidence. Further, examples of real checklists, the meat of the book, was obvious miss.
  • (3/5)
    A worthwhile, thought-provoking book even for those not in any of the health care fields
  • (4/5)
    I appreciate counter-intuitive ideas. A book that confirms what I already believe has an easy task – preaching to the choir, if you will. But Gawande, a surgeon who has reflected on performance challenges in previous books, had a bigger hill to climb in this book about the use of checklists to improve performance on complex tasks. Prior to reading this book, I believed that checklists were appropriate for routine tasks, but might limit creativity and teamwork for complex tasks. Using examples from industries like healthcare, construction, investment services, and aviation, Gawande argues that checklists can be useful for complex tasks. They remove the need to focus on the routine and free up cognitive space for other parts of the task. They can be used to encourage communication between team members at various points in the process. And they can be used to insert pause points in processes so that unforeseen complications can be addressed. In making his point, Gawande sometimes makes claims that may need a bit of qualification. For example, he repeatedly asserts that team members who do not know each other previously to working together should introduce themselves before starting a surgery or flying a plane. This I agree with. However, I’m uncertain that this step alone creates teamwork to the extent that Gawande claims. But for the most part, Gawande uses evidence and examples to support the potential benefits of checklists for a range of complex tasks.
  • (4/5)
    I agree with some of the lukewarm reviews. I found the perfect description in another review: "gladwellian". a bit disappointed with its (lack of) depth.
  • (4/5)
    A heartfelt and thoughtful call for simple systematics action to prevent potentially catastrophic failure.
  • (5/5)
    This was a fascinating read, a real page-turner which I've already shared with others, who were equally excited about it. The idea is absurdly simple, and that's exactly why it gets ignored. People think anything that easy and obvious cannot possibly be useful. Dr. Gawande builds his case with care, providing powerful, far-reaching and riveting stories of this tool at work in the worlds of medicine, aviation, and construction. He also provides guidance for taking the idea home and building one's own effective checklists. The idea may be simple but there is a science to using it properly! Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting read. The author gives good examples of how checklists have helped humans manage complex problems. Examples are given in a number of professions - construction, medical, aviation, and finance. He also explores why it is so difficult to have professionals adopt a clearly effective strategy in their work.
  • (4/5)
    An immensely easy read. Gawande doesn't try to impress you with big words (he is a surgeon). Jargon is kept to a minimum as though he is talking to a patient who doesn't need to know the big words.And so checklists are not new. The case he makes is that in a world - our world - which has become more complex we need to make checklists to keep us focused on our tasks, to avoid "ineptitude" to use his word.Plenty of interesting examples from medicine (his field) to the aviation business, construction business and beyond.Useful if applied. This is one of the challenges facing the implementation of the checklist - it is so simple that one feels like a simpleton. But a checklist (not unlike making a note of something in case one forgets) is a solution to many of our daily operational problems.
  • (3/5)
    This book was recommended on the Freakonomics blog (I think) so I decided to check it out. The author, a surgeon, explores how simple checklists at critical points can have dramatic effects on the outcome of complex processes. Although it dragged at times, overall I found it fascinating. All my pilot friends will definitely enjoy the discussion of how aviation embraced checklists and how new ones are developed and tested.
  • (4/5)
    I just love reading Gawande. He's so enthusiastic and makes his stories so accessible and interesting. I'm a checklist girl, too. So: liked the book a lot.
  • (4/5)
    At first glance the story of the creation of pre-surgical checklists to avoid frequent complications, surgeon and writer Gawande persuades us that one way to cope with complexity and specialization is to create the expert checklist. This idea of the checklist is not the exhaustive list of someone who is just learning or who has a poor memory. No, this idea is that we need more spare, whittled down lists, and that they should be weighted towards the few simple but high-impact things that we might be liable to forget among all our specialized tasks, plus items to get us to work better together: to meet our teammates and to share our specialized and context-specific knowledge. As always, Gawande gives a quick and pleasurable read.
  • (3/5)
    Gawande makes a good case for the usefulness of checklists as a means of avoiding human error in medicine and other areas of human activity. The argument that checklists used systematically save lives and prevent accidents is convincing and worth making. Whether there is enough, however, to justify a book is doubtful. This book is a relatively easy read and can be finished in a few hours.