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The Talisman

The Talisman

Scritto da Stephen King e Peter Straub

Narrato da Frank Muller


The Talisman

Scritto da Stephen King e Peter Straub

Narrato da Frank Muller

valutazioni:
4/5 (2.473 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
28 ore
Pubblicato:
6 nov 2012
ISBN:
9781442359079
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Stephen King and Peter Straub's epic thriller about a young boy's quest to save his mother's life.

Jack Sawyer, twelve years old, is about to begin a most fantastic journey, an exalting, terrifying quest for the mystical Talisman—the only thing that can save Jack's dying mother. But to reach his goal, Jack must make his way not only across the breadth of the United States but also through the wondrous and menacing parallel world of the Territories.

In the Territories, Jack finds another realm, where the air is so sweet and clear a man can smell a radish being pulled from the ground a mile away—and a life can be snuffed out instantly in the continuing struggle between good and evil. Here Jack discovers "Twinners," reflections of the people he knows on earth—most notably Queen Laura, the "Twinner" of Jack's own imperiled mother. As Jack "flips" between worlds, making his way westward toward the redemptive Talisman, a sequence of heart-stopping encounters challenges him at every step.

An unforgettable epic of adventure and resounding triumph, The Talisman is one of the most influential and highly praised works of fantasy ever written.
Pubblicato:
6 nov 2012
ISBN:
9781442359079
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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2473 valutazioni / 72 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite Stephen King books
  • (5/5)
    Read this book when I was eleven years old, which is also the year it came out. I was enthralled with it. I loved it then, the layers, the depth. It was a stretch for King. I think he was pulling on some personal demons while writing this. Now as an adult I am reading it again. It has not lost its sense of wonder. Of course it is easer to understand. There are a few chapters where you really feel for Jack. His first night alone in the territories is frightening. Kings makes it clear what it would be like for ourselves as a child to experience this lonlieness. I admit, I am not that familiar with Straub, but I will soon be putting a remedy to that. This is a direction however that I did not want to see King step into. Of course a good writer cannot pigieon hole themselves, but his later fantasy work just flew by me.
  • (3/5)
    God pound it, that was a tedious read! There is an awesome 300 page book in this behemoth! Jack Sawyer takes on a Herculean task and must cross the country/Territories to achieve it. Part Tom Sawyer, part Jack Kerouac, and even a bit of Jesus in this 12 year old! A good tale, but stretched out much too long. Makes me nervous about the sequel. Wolf!
  • (3/5)
    A coming-of-age, fantasy, horror story, starring the usual resourceful, intelligent white boy. An entertaining read.
  • (5/5)
    Read it when I was a teen loved it.
    I have the sequel but have yet to indulge.
  • (3/5)
    This was about the only 80’s King I hadn’t read and was excited to get into it, but it didn’t really work for me on the whole.

    There are a few sequences which rank among Kings better stuff; the intro, Jacks trials at Oatley, and the final confrontation at the Sun House, which are perhaps the three most horrific sections of the book.

    The rest dragged for me terribly. I felt like they could have done something more interesting with The Territories.

    Maybe it’s because I’m not the biggest fantasy fan, maybe it’s because I’m too old (I feel like this book would be best for a teen.) but I didn’t love it. But hey, I loved Cujo and Tommyknockers, and everyone thinks those are terrible, so take this with a grain of salt.

    Frank Mullers narration is great as always. Recommended for teenage King fans, fantasy lovers and purists…maybe worth the read for those above notes sequences alone. Wolfs rampage is gripping.
  • (5/5)
    Highly recommend a great book great story definitely read it or listen
  • (1/5)
    I loved the book when I read it a long time ago. I was really looking forward to the audiobook since my eyesight is not that good. But I simply cannot get through the audiobook . It's the narrator. I wish someone else would narrate this book as the story is very entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    I've always liked the writing of Stephen King,having read all the books by him that I bought for my Wife before she passed,several years ago. It's good to be able to listen to them now,as my eyes aren't up to reading so much anymore.
    His writing is quite articulate and easy to follow,and tends to draw me into the story as I read along. VERY good story here!
  • (5/5)
    My favorite book of all time. Beautifully read. Oh my heart.
  • (5/5)
    One of my most favorite books of all time. I didn't really care for the reader. I found his reading style a bit too breathy, but I didn't let that detract from the wonderful story. If you haven't read it and you love fantasy, this is a must read.
  • (2/5)
    Ive been on a Stephen King spree listening and reading his books and watching the movie/tv adaptation to them. This so far is the only one im currently working on finishing and its a struggle. I really like Frank Muller as a narrator and was a lil disappointed they had to make the switch from him during the Dark Tower series as his narration is lively and does an excellent job of depicting his voice depending on the character. Unfortunately not even that could keep my interest in this story. I listen to audiobooks while im working as i can keep working, but i would find myself distracted as parts would not hold my interest and i would have to restart chapters over to fully grasp what was going on. I will probably let this one go and start something else as i feel im just wasting time i could be listening to something that will hopd my interest more
  • (5/5)
    Solid book now on to the next rd . I hate that I’m just now getting into these great books
  • (3/5)
    It’s an unusual story by King. It’s very long and so the story doesn’t flow but rather gets going and then stops for a few chapters. The characters are onedimensional and lack depth and motivation. There are a lot of coincidences and a lot of intuition, which makes the story a bit hard to believe.
    There isn’t a good antagonist. The World in which the story is set is huge, but we barely learn about it. I don’t think I’ll re-read, but I do recommend for fans of coming of age stories and fantasy travel.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books ever! I love the story!
  • (5/5)
    Red this book when I was younger, it always stuck in my mind, finally tried it again in audio book format... Still the best book I've ever read in my life.. PS. Still waiting for the series for TV, come on, just make it soon.. ?
  • (5/5)
    I read this book when I was in my teens and it’s still to this day my favorite book. It gets me in the feels every time.
  • (3/5)
    Came off as a cheap version of the dark tower series.......... does nothin we havent seen before.. and the character building isnt well done...... has a weird reoccruing sexual theme for no reason... and gets a bit boring and anticlimatic......
  • (1/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This is one of my favorite books, but the guy reading is terrible. It’s unlistenable. He ends every sentence... and I mean every sentence, with a low, slow breathy word, like a cheesy impression of William Shatner. It never stops!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (1/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This guy is unbearable to listen too.
    His “soooo very dramatic” inflection is just too much to bear. EVERYTHING shouldn’t be said so menacing. I can’t do it.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Excellent straight fantasy by King. This isn't horror or part horror and fantasy, more straight fantasy.
  • (4/5)
    When twelve-year-old Jack Sawyer, and his mother, Lily, move to a hotel called the Alhambra on the coast of New Hampshire, Jack somehow knows his mother is dying. He feels lost and alone until one day, Jack meets a strange old man on the beach, and they become friends. Speedy Parker seems like a cool guy, but the more time they spend together, the more Jack starts to remember strange things from his childhood. Jack soon realizes, if he wants his mother to live, it's up to him to find the Talisman—whatever that is. Following Speedy's instructions and his own intuition, Jack lights out on an epic quest that is nothing short of an action-packed, horror-filled adventure where he barely escapes death—slipping in and out of a mysterious land called The Territories, where anything can and does happen. The joining of King and Straub is like combining whiskey and LSD. They take you to a place you never want to go—except through the pages of a book.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars 13-year old Jack's mother is dying. He finds himself on a quest from New Hampshire to California to find a “talisman” to cure his mom. This quest will take him back and forth between worlds, this one and the “Territories”. I waffled on this one between rating it ok (3 stars) and good (3.5 stars). I'm not even sure what genre to call it – it was a mix of horror, science fiction, and fantasy, maybe? I'm not always a fantasy fan, and what I did find in this book was that the parts that I lost interest in where mostly the parts in the Territories, the other world. My mind did wander at times, but there were other times where I was interested. In a way, some of the parts felt a little like short stories (which I'm also not a fan of), but more fleshed out short stories, where there would be some focus on the people Jack met and what he was doing for a time, then he'd move and on there would be new people and another “story” before he moved on again. Overall, I'll rate it “good”, but I don't think I'll read the sequel.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    When two masters of horror team up you get a masterpiece such as The Talisman. I've actually never read any of Peter Straub's work however am a big Stephen King fan. The Talisman is the story of 12 year old Jakc Sawyer's quest to save his mother and his journey across America and it's twin dimension The Territories. I found this book to be more dark fantasy than horror, however it had its horrific elements as you would expect from the the authors. Truly, the most horrific parts for me were the more human aspects, but this is typical for King at least.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    The Talisman by Stephen King- I haven’t read in quite a few years and when i saw it on my mother’s bookshelf i had to commandeer it. I forgot how much i enjoyed that book. The main story is about 12 year old Jack and his quest to save his mother…and his mother’s twinner, The Queen of the Territories. Oh Stephen King and your crazy worlds within worlds with in world theories..it’s why i love you. Any way there really isn’t much i can say about this book…i love it, any one in their right mind should at least enjoy it. ‘nuff said
  • (4/5)
    Jack Sawyer is on a quest to save his mother's life. The journey will take him through two worlds,many dangers, and test his heart and grit to survive.Jack will meet friends and enemies, old and new.Is he destined to complete the task, or will his Uncle Morgan Sloat/Morgan of Orris along with Sunlight Gardner/Osmond end Jack's and his mother's lives.Sometimes hard to follow, but worth every second.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Jack Sawyer was my first character crush. Ok, maybe not my first. But what an awesome adventure. It has everything. Horror, mystery, thriller, fantasy, love - mostly familial love, but still. After all this, it is just an amazing story of friendships and the journey.  

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (3/5)
    This has a companion book, The Regulators. Aside from being told they were companion books, I really wouldn't have guessed.
  • (2/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Officially the worst book I've read by King as I continue to reread his books in chronological order. First, while I do distinctly remember owning this book when it came out, I had absolutely no recollection of the story whatsoever and now I understand why as it is so forgettable. This book needs to loose 400 or so pages to make it a decent YA fantasy. The book is indeed very adolescent, coming mostly from a 12-year-old's perspective there is hardly anything in the majority of the book to offend anyone. I'm surprised at how cliched the story is. Jack finds out there is an alternate world. His mother is dying in this world and the Queen, who is his mother's twinner, is dying in the other. He has been chosen to be the one who must travel west across the country to find the talisman which will rescue the Queen and his mother. So off he goes on a journey with pages and pages of nothing happening. Even the big showdown at the end with good vs evil was more campy than anything else. I really had to force myself to finish this book, and then only for the sake of my chronological project.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (3/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Summary: Jack Sawyer's mother, an aging B-movie actress, picked him up and moved him from California to a moldering hotel in an abandoned-for-the-winter East Coast tourist town. Jack knows there's something wrong, that she's very sick, even though she is doing her best to pretend that everything is fine, and to make things worse, Jack's late father's business partner, Morgan Sloat, is harrassing their family, trying to get Jack's mother to sign over their half of the company. Jack must do something, but he doesn't know what, until a custodian at a local carnival tells him about the Territories - a magical parallel world, a world that Jack's father knew how to visit, and which Jack himself can learn to enter. The Queen of the Territories is also dying, and Jack must go there and retrieve the Talisman, a magical object that will heal both his mother and the Queen. But the Talisman is in California - or the Territories equivalent of California. And how can a twelve-year-old boy make it across the country and back, while being chased by Morgan's evil forces, before time runs out... in both worlds?Review: There are books that have a time limit for me, or an age limit. I've read plenty of books and thought "That was okay, but I bet I would have loved it if I'd read it when I was eight/twelve/fifteen." Mostly these are mid-grade books that don't quite make the leap to adult readership, but in the case of The Talisman, it's more a function of my reading tastes changing over time. Because if someone had handed it to me when I was thirteen or fourteen, when I was in the throes of my horror-reading phase, and was devouring Dean Koontz and Stephen King like they were going out of style, I suspect I would have, if not loved it, at least had an easier time with it than I did as an adult.Because damn, this book was a tough slog for me this time through. It was slow reading, the pacing seemed really terribly off, it rarely drew me in enough to want to go back to it, I didn't get along with the prose style, I didn't really care about most of the characters, I was put off by both the horror/gore and some of the implicit social attitudes in the book, and I knew the quest was going to work out - since that's how these books go - so I wasn't particularly curious about the ending. In fact, I almost DNFed the book despite having committed several weeks to it, and already being 80% of the way through. Instead, I buckled down to some serious skimming to get through the last section (which, unsurprisingly, played out very much like I was expecting.) I think the pacing was the biggest problem. The Talisman is structurally similar to The Odyssey, with the protagonist on a quest, but he keeps getting sidetracked/stuck along his journey. Conceptually, I have no problem with these kinds of road-trip novels, but in the case of The Talisman, the time spent in the various side adventures seemed uneven relative to their overall importance to the story, and just out of balance in general. Fully two-thirds of the book is spent getting Jack from the East Coast to Springfield, Illinois, and then he covers the distance between Illinois and California in only a few chapters, and without any major adventure. I also didn't really care for Jack as a character. I got tired of hearing about how the Territories were changing him to this serene, wise, beautiful boy, especially when I found his companions, Wolf and Richard, much more likeable and interesting, respectively. The rest of the characters didn't fare much better than Jack; particularly distasteful was the character of Speedy Parker, who sets Jack on his way to the Territories with a bottle of magic juice, and could be the model for the "magical negro" character that King's so fond of, complete with dialect. (Also, the shorthand of "casual use of cocaine = villain" got me thinking - that's a trope I remember from my teens, when I read a lot of books like this, but not something that I've seen at all recently. Is that still a thing in more current fiction?) The book shows its age in other ways, too, not only in outdated cultural references but also in some of the attitudes about race, women, and homosexuals that are implicit in the writing. (To wit: "These [sexual advances from grown men] were annoyances a good-looking twelve-year-old boy in Los Angeles simply learned to put up with, the way a pretty woman learns to put up with being groped occasionally on the subway. You eventually find a way to cope without letting it spoil your day." What the hell do King and Straub know about how a woman should react to being groped by a stranger?) Basically, the whole book felt self-indulgent, both in terms of the prose and the plot, without a correspondingly interesting story or compelling characters to merit it. The story definitely has potential: I like the ideas of the Territories, and Twinners, and how actions in one world affect the other; I loved Wolf as a character, and Richard's contrast to Jack; and some of the individual scenes were very tense and compelling... but the bloat of the book quickly swamped out the good parts. I probably would have put up with it (or even eaten it up) as a teen, but I've gotten less patient in my old age. 2.5 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: It seems like there are plenty of people out there who liked this book a whole lot better than I did, so if you like supernatural horror and/or fantasy quest novels, particularly ones set in the real world, it might be worth a try. But for me, I think I've grown out of, or at least away from, this type of book, and King's style of prose.

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