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In The Night Kitchen

In The Night Kitchen

Scritto da Maurice Sendak

Narrato da Peter Schickele


In The Night Kitchen

Scritto da Maurice Sendak

Narrato da Peter Schickele

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (39 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1987
ISBN:
9780545667500
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Sendaks classic comic fantasy of Mickeys adventures in the night kitchen tells us how we get our morning cake.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1987
ISBN:
9780545667500
Formato:
Audiolibro


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3.7
39 valutazioni / 49 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    The illustrations are the only thing going for this book. The dream sequence is difficult to follow. The little boy penis is nothing to be upset about, little toddler boys often run around naked. I don’t understand why the author included it in his illustrations, however.
  • (2/5)
    Mickey falls asleep and floats off into a dream, landing in "the night kitchen" where the bakers make him into a cake until he builds a plane of dough and flies off.This is such an odd book. It is considered a classic and clearly many people love it. For me, it really didn't do much. While I often like works with a dream-like quality, this one was more absurd than dreamy or even surreal. The three bakers who all look like Oliver Hardy was a particularly strange touch. It's perhaps worth noting that this book has been a source of controversy. The much maligned appearance of a naked Mickey was not something I really cared about, and I can't see why that was ever such a big fuss.
  • (1/5)
    When Oliver Hardy cloned himself, he set up an underground bakery to employ his carbon-based copies. Notoriously, clones can be horribly defective and the rumness of Mr Hardy's reproductions was evidenced by a slipshod attitude towards stock control and a cavalier attitude towards cannibalism. Luckily, the boy they intended to oven-bake could fashion flying escape mechanisms out of fat. Unluckily, nothing in this dysfunctional dream appealed to either of my children.
  • (5/5)
    In The Night Kitchen is all about a boy who dreams that he falls through his floor and into the Night Kitchen where some bakers mistake him with milk and try to bake him into the next day's cake. He gets away and learns all about how baked goods are prepared by bakers all night long so that we have cake every morning. The drawings are done in typical Sendak style with scratched in lines and cartoonish features. Like in Sendak's other books, the Night Kitchen is all about how kids can get into sometimes scary trouble while on their own and in their own imaginations, but they have to talk to the figures who are trying to eat them and work their way out on their own. I appreciate how whimsical this classic is, and how it teaches a lesson about a job that kids often don't think about. The preschool I teach at is connected to a bakery and the kids often come in with treats their parents just purchased for them, so this book is a revelation to them.
  • (2/5)
    Will the bakers bake little Mickey in the cake? He lets them know he's there and even goes to the Milky Way to get ingredients. A very odd little story.
  • (4/5)
    i liked the story, "In the Night Kitchen," by Maurice Sendak. I liked the overall idea of the story. The main idea of the story is to use and have an imagination because it can make life more interesting. An example of the main idea in the story is at the beginning when Mickey hears a loud thumb downstairs in the middle of the night. Mickey's imagination says its a team of bakers who are all working to make a cake by morning, and he decides to help them. Secondly, I liked the illustrations in the story. I liked the illustrations because they made the story more vivid and explainable. For example, when Mickey is being baked into the cake, I wouldn't have understood what Sendak was trying to say without the picture. Furthermore, I wouldn't have comprehended that Mickey was literally being baked into the cake. Lastly, I liked the format of the sentences in the story. I liked how some of the sentences were extended over a series of pages because it made the story feel like it was occurring over a long period of time. In addition, there are some pages without words. I liked these pages as well because it allowed the reader to interpret those pages however he or she wants.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This story is a fantasy that encourages children to use their imagination by reading about a boy who is asleep at night and gets up because he hears a noise. He ends up in the kitchen where the bakers are baking and he lands in the batter where they think he is milk. Personal Reaction:I liked this book because it is so far-fetched that it encourages the use of the imagination, however, some of the content seemed inappropriate....such as baking a boy.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Because this story involves a cake, the class could bake a cake with the help of the teacher. When the cake is ready, the children could add toppings to the frosting.2. The children bring their favorite bedtime story to show and tell.
  • (5/5)
    A favorite and one of the first books I bought for my son even before he was born. I love the dreamlike drawings and the idea that anyone gets to eat cake for breakfast every day.
  • (5/5)
    Every word in this is pretty much perfect. Where the Wild Things Are is great, but it's also a bit more an adult's precious idea of how a kid is sometimes--the everydayness of this one, the way the kitchen and the Oliver Hardy chefs are totally mundane but also totally freaky, and all the things that happen make no sense but all in the service of breakfast ("and that's why we have cake every morning," Sendak says, straightfaced, and I wonder if they did or what?), and Mickey the kid chortles through it all and comes out of the batter looking like a dough octopus--there are worlds hidden behind the ones we know and nothing has any cause or effect but it's still all AWESOME--that's how I remember toddlerhood, as the midpoint between "Little Nemo" and Spirited Away.
  • (3/5)
    I had mixed feelings about this book. The plot was interesting, for the goal was for Mickey to help the baker's make their cake. The feelings of fantasy are strong. Especially, when Mickey does unrealistic things such as jump into a huge bottle of milk. The character of Mickey can be desirable to children because he has an active imagination and gets to experience an adventure. However, the big idea did not seem clear except for maybe children should enjoy their imaginations or adventures.
  • (3/5)
    I honestly don't know what to think about this one...
  • (3/5)
    Maurice Sendak's story about a young boy outsmarting a few creepy bakers that are trying to bake him inside a cake. The illustrations are incredible as to be expected from Sendak and the story is a bit weird and slightly off-beat which is also classic Sendak. It is a story of how children are smart, resilient, and more than capable of taking care of themselves.
  • (5/5)
    Controversial for it's inclusion of child nudity. Contains allusions to the Holocaust. Illustrations are similar to a comic book.
  • (3/5)
    Mickey travels to the night kitchen in his dreams and finds himself mixed into cake batter when the bakers confuse him with milk so he seeks to set the bakers straight and goes looking for the proper ingredient. As usual, Sendak's illustrations are stunningly detailed and inviting, creating a whimsical, imaginative backdrop for Mickey's midnight adventures. While In the Night Kitchen has been challenged for its depiction of Mickey's genitalia, I didn't find the illustrations offensive - indeed, I don't think Mickey's adventures would have made as much sense if he hadn't been nude since he spends a lot of time covered in cake batter and later immersed in a giant jug of milk. Had he been wearing clothing, the illustrations would not have flowed as smoothly and Mickey would be lacking the freedom that makes his actions in the night kitchen possible. The story is fun and silly, reminescent of the kind of fantasy a young child might invent as he drifts off to sleep.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a fun trip through the mind of a child who desires (like all kids) cake in the mornings. The illustrations by Mr. Sendak are stupendous. There are even variations on old lullabies woven into the text which makes it a treat for young and old.My only complaint about the book is the controversy surrounding the "nudity." It is completely overblown and ridiculous.I have to admit a soft spot in my heart for this book as Mickey and his desire for cake reminds me of my nearly 2 year old son. This really is a great read. Perhaps my new favorite in the Sendak library.
  • (1/5)
    To be honest, I did not like this book for a few reasons. I like the concept of a boy dreaming and the dream being told, but I don't like the way it was told. The little boy falls out of his bed and into cake batter. The story continues onto him making an airplane to get milk to the bakers. I feel like it is inappropriate for young students to read. The illustrations were a little too revealing. In not one, or two, but quite a few pictures, Mickey was naked. I feel like because of this students would not focus on the story, but rather the pictures of the naked boy. The writing was confusing even for me to keep up with. While Mickey was saying something, then the chefs started chanting some things. This was confusing to me as a reader. Mickey is a believable character because it is just about a boy showing his dreams. I do not really understand the big idea to this story except explaining a dream that the boy had. The message might have been about thoughts that children his age have and dream about. Again, I did not like this story.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely, 'retro' illustrations, including the infamous penis.Why don't we see more genitalia in children's books? I'm all for that.
  • (3/5)
    Mickey heard a racket downstairs and demanded quiet whereupon he fell through the dark and lost his clothes.In a dream like trace, Mickey is transported into the light of the night kitchen were he meets three bakers. The bakers drawn by Sendak very much resemble Laurel and Hardy, with Nazi like mustaches.Mixing Mickey in the batter, with little concern that he will be harmed, they attempt to bake him in the oven. Mickey escapes in a pile of dough shaped like a plane, stealing the measuring cup, he finds a large bottle of milk and measures enough for the three bakers to make their morning cake, without him inside! Mickey slides down the side of the giant milk bottle and is transported back into his bed.This was, and continues to be a controversial book. Many object to the fact that Mickey is fully nude with exposed genitals. The large question is: Is child nudity "morally acceptable?" Interestingly, this book is on the American Library Association list of books banned. It holds the place of 25th of the 100 most frequently challenged books.Oh, gesh, I say to all those uptight librarians, dust off your pearls!
  • (3/5)
    Considering that Chicken Soup with Rice was one of my favorite books as a child, I think it's only fair to try read all of Sendak's books - so away we go. The fact that people get all upset over this book because the little boy main character spends some of his time being naked is so over-reactive. It's so not a big deal. Let's all get over ourselves.
  • (2/5)
    I typically LOVE Maurice Sendak books, and Where the Wild Things Are is one of my all-time favorites. While the illustrations in this one were pretty neat, the story was just so-so to me. I expect Sendak books to charm the socks off of me, but it just didn't happen this time. Oh well.
  • (5/5)
    Surreal dreamtime book by the creator of Where the Wild Things Are. At bedtime, Mickey falls into the Night Kitchen where the bakers (who look a lot like Oliver Hardy, IMO) are baking the morning cake. This may sound scary, but it's not; Mickey escapes the bakers in a plane made of dough, swipes their measuring cup and flies to the Milky Way to gather some milk. Full of fun fantasy, this story will make little sense to adult minds, but I bet your children will love it! Challenged/banned for: depicting nudity and offensive language (I guess they mean the naked boy crowing "Cock-a-doodle-doo" at the end?! I can't find any offensive language in the book!).
  • (3/5)
    In the Night Kitchen is about a boy named Mickey, who falls up (while laying in bed) into the Night Kitchen. I found this book to be a little odd. Mickey is naked throughout most of the book, except when he is covered in batter. He falls "up" is strange alone. When reading this, be sure to point out the illustrations and mention that people fall down, not up. A younger kid would walk around saying that he fell up after reading this. The whole story doesn't much much sense, but after all Mickey is dreaming and anything is possible when we dream. After reading this, you could also have your class tell, or illustrate one of their dreams.
  • (4/5)
    "In the Night Kitchen" is about a young boy name Mickey that falls asleep one night and ends up mysteriously falling into the night kitchen where he finds three bakers making a cake. Mickey creates an airplane out of the dough and flies to retrieve some milk. The next day when Mickey wakes up there is cake for breakfast and everyday thereafter. The book bridges reality and fantasy into an interesting and fun story for young children.
  • (5/5)
    It is hard to believe that this book has been banned! Only because the little boy shows little nudity. But if you realize the book is just the imagination of child's dream, you realize that it really is not that bad. Yes, maybe this is not a good book for lower levels of reading because the fact they are not mature enough yet. But, that should not make it banned from everyone! I totally disagree with banned books. "Freedom of Speech"
  • (3/5)
    The illustrations were very entertaining. I like that they looked somewhat like a comic book with the text boxes and speech bubbles. I must admit it was a little strange that Mickey lost his clothing in this dream and that he ended up in a milk jar.
  • (4/5)
    A silly tale of how Mickey gets milk for the bakers so there will be bread and cake for breakfast
  • (5/5)
    Personal Response: I love this book. I really appreciate the small details, like the airplane above the bed that appears in the dream.Curricular Connection: This book could be read aloud to preschool children who could then talk about different dreams they've had.
  • (5/5)
    The illustrations in the book might be the only book I would say is better than Where the Wild Things Are. Sendak is only to be outdone by himself:) I was saddened and disturbed to read and hear about a campaign to have this magical story removed from elementary school libraries because of the naked main character Mickey. It is a wonderful fantasy picture book and besides, who if not elementary age children have seen naked little kids?!?
  • (5/5)
    Delightful illustration takes the reader through an adventurous night with Mickey, who flies across a Parisian looking city made of cooking utensils & skyscrapers, only to end up in tomorrow mornings cake batter that is about to be cooked! He tells the chefs, "I'm not MILK, I'm MICKEY!" and flies his plane of dough to get real milk for the cake. Absolutely wonderful.
  • (5/5)
    This book is Maurice Sendak's fanciful version of how we get cake every morning. Mickey, the young boy who falls into the Night Kitchen during a dream, helps get milk for the bakers who mix, beat, and bake the cake batter for our benefit. The entire story is dream-like, as are the wonderful muted watercolor and ink illustrations that mix reality and fantasy. The swirling strokes of Sendak's brush add to this dream-like quality as well. These illustrations helped this book win a Caldecott Honor, an award that I think was aptly awarded to Sendak. Although this book depicts a naked young boy (one reason why it has been challenged by parents and administrators), the simple and lyrical writing style is appropriate for children and the adults that read to them. I'd highly recommend it to readers who enjoyed Sendak's most famous book, Where the Wild Things Are, as both books explore what happens to children in their dreams. And besides, In the Night Kitchen is also an interesting way to explain how baked goods are readily available in the morning!