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Dear Mr. Henshaw

Dear Mr. Henshaw

Scritto da Beverly Cleary

Narrato da Pedro Pascal


Dear Mr. Henshaw

Scritto da Beverly Cleary

Narrato da Pedro Pascal

valutazioni:
4/5 (78 valutazioni)
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1 ora
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Apr 28, 2009
ISBN:
9780061762666
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Descrizione

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I wish somebody would stop stealing the good stuff out of my lunchbag. I guess I wish a lot of other things, too. I wish someday Dad and Bandit would pull up in front in the rig ... Dad would yell out of the cab, "Come on, Leigh. Hop in and I'll give you a lift to school."

Leigh Botts has been author Boyd Henshaw's number one fan ever since he was in second grade. Now in sixth grade, Leigh lives with his mother and is the new kid at school. He's lonely, troubled by the absence of his father, a cross-country trucker, and angry because a mysterious thief steals from his lunchbag. Then Leigh's teacher assigns a letter-writing project. Naturally Leigh chooses to write to Mr. Henshaw, whose surprising answer changes Leigh's life.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Apr 28, 2009
ISBN:
9780061762666
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up. Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born! Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    At least twice during school, my reading textbook contained an excerpt from this. And both times it was the part where the boy gets to go to lunch with an author. Now I finally read it.That excerpt is nothing like the book.Well, maybe a little. It is about a young boy who writes letters to an author. They start as “fan mail/questions”. Then it becomes personal stuff about his life–way too personal–that transforms into essentially a diary, or shouting into the wind. And it’s in epistolary format, so it’s fun to see his writing style evolve over time. I was under the impression that Mr. Henshaw never responds to the boy, but in fact he does. You just don’t see those responses. But writing is not what the book is about.It’s about his coming to terms with his parents’ divorce and his deadbeat truck driver father. A bit cliche now, but not so much when this was written. I don’t know why, but something felt off about this book. Maybe it was my expectations that it would be about a boy becoming a writer and then being delivered a bildrungsoman. Maybe I couldn’t much relate to the boy. He’s living in a trailer and he’s constantly talking about his father–if he’s going to come visit, if he’s going to call, what he’s doing with their dog, who was that woman who answered the phone, and so on. Something’s lacking–either charm or wit or levity. It seems bleak. It seems like the moral is “adults are shits and there’s nothing you can do about it, kid”. It’s a solid idea, but lacks plot. So it comes off whiny. I imagine this is the kid who grew up to become J.D. Salinger.
  • (5/5)
    from building rainbows
    In his letters to his favorite author, ten-year-old Leigh reveals his problems in coping with his parents' divorce, being the new boy in school, and generally finding his own place in the world.
    In this story, a boy named Leigh Botts writes to a man named Mr.Henshaw. It doesn't tell his first name in the story. Leigh Botts has always written to Mr.Henshaw since he was in the third grade. It's funny how every time Leigh moves to a different grade he has to do the same work. He had to write to a writer in all his grades from third to sixth grade.

    Mr.Henshaw is a professional writer and Leigh Botts has read every one of his books. Leigh Botts wrote a letter to Mr.Henshaw about books that Mr. Henshaw had written called "Moose On Toast" and "Ways To Amuse a Dog." Mr. Henshaw did write back but with a typewriter. Leigh Botts sent Mr. Henshaw some questions and he never answered them until Leigh Botts wrote to him again.

    Finally Leigh gets answers to his questions.

    This book was published in 1983 and I cannot believe it took me this many years to read this wonderful book. I read it in one sitting. It deals with tough topics but topics very real to our students today.
  • (4/5)
    This book is so realistic that I felt myself having twinges of emotions. This would have been a great book for me to have read when I was a child. I will have a more full review on my website, but for the most part I would highly recommend this book, if you have never read it.
  • (1/5)
    it was stupid.
  • (4/5)
    Perseverance pays off, what you want isn't always what you get. Sometimes what you get is better than you ever expected.
  • (1/5)
    bad rellay bad i hated it . so did my friends.
  • (3/5)
    Part of my goal of reading the Newberry Award winning books (at least the ones that came out before I turned, like, 14 or so). This is a great book for kids of divorced parents. It really gets into the head of this kid.
  • (4/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is a heart-warming story about a boy named Leigh Botts trying to navigate the aftermath of his parents' divorce. Written by Beverly Cleary in the form of letters and diary entries, the Newbery Medal winning book shows Leigh transform from a struggling second grader to a confident, self-assured sixth grader. At times laugh-out-loud silly, and at times poignantly sad, Leigh's pen-pal correspondences and diary entries leave you feeling satisfied about the way he sees his family, friends, and himself. This book could be used in a classroom as a mentor-text for letter writing. Students might be inspired to write to their favorite authors like Leigh writes to Mr. Henshaw. Also, it highlights how keeping a diary is a wonderful way to improve writing skills and release pent up emotions. This book would speak in particular to students whose parents are divorced, although it is definitely accessible to all.
  • (4/5)
    Perseverance pays off, what you want isn't always what you get. Sometimes what you get is better than you ever expected.
  • (4/5)
    The subject of letter writing may seem like history, but this book actually made me want to reach out to someone using paper and pencil, like it used to be in the old days. I don't know that I can explain why, maybe it was the fact that the child stuck to what he was doing, even though in the beginning adults were pushing him when he wasn't really feeling it. This alone is proof to young readers that though you might not like something at first, you may find you enjoy it in the end.The story of Leigh's life isn't an easy one. He is dealing with his parents being divorced, he is dealing with the struggles of the living situation that comes with divorce, but it isn't a heavy or weighted book. There are down times and there are moments of enjoyment, there are times when he becomes angry, but there are times when things seem to be going okay and there is nothing to be frustrated about. Through the letter writing we learn a lot about Leigh's situation, his feelings, and his desire to be a writer.An excellent book for young readers who want to be authors some day or for children in single parent households. The unique style of the writing (the book is basically a collection of letters and diary entries) helps to encourage the reader to envision themselves as a part of the story or to apply it to their lives. Easy to see why it won the Newbery Award.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: This book is composed of letters and diary entries written by a sixth grade boy named Leigh. He writes letters to Boyd Henshaw the author of his favorite book "Ways to Amuse a Dog". At first he writes the letters because his teachers want him to write letters to an author to learn more about them and their writing process. When Leigh asks Mr. Henshaw questions about his writing he responds with questions of his own. Leigh does not want to answer the questions but his mother makes him. Leigh continues to write to Mr. Henshaw about his own personal writing and how he can write his own stories. Mr. Henshaw encourages Leigh to start a diary so that he can write about his daily experiences. Through the diary entries we learn more about the divorce of Leigh's parents. We also learn that Leigh resents his dad for leaving and not calling or visiting very often. Leigh also reaches out to Mr. Henshaw because he is struggling to write something for the Young Writers' Yearbook. Mr. Henshaw helps him to realize that he needs to write from personal experiences rather than trying to copy the style of any other author. At school Leigh is struggling to make new friends and someone is always stealing food out of his lunchbox. He makes an alarm to put in his lunchbox. Through the alarm fiasco at lunch he makes a friend named Barry who he begins to spend time with. At the end of the story his father comes to visit him which makes Leigh happy.Review: I thought this book was very interesting. I had never actually read a chapter book by Beverly Cleary which is surprising because they are so popular. I liked how the whole book was written as either letters or diary entries. This seemed to help the reader follow along with the story and what was going on in relation to the time of year. I liked that the author did not include any letters written by Mr. Henshaw and we only heard bits and pieces of what he said from Leigh. This kept a sense of mystery about him especially because his letters were infrequent and they usually came in the form of a postcard. I like how the reader is able to watch Leigh grow and change throughout the story. I think Leigh is a character many students could relate to. I liked that there were a few illustrations that broke up the text but were closely related to what was going on in the story at the time.
  • (4/5)
    I think this is a fantastic book to read in the classroom when teaching students about letter-writing. In this novel Leigh is writing to his favorite author Mr. Henshaw for a school assignment. Mr. Henshaw writes back to Leigh and asks him questions to get to know Leigh better. During this process Leigh starts to keep a journal and writes about his everyday experiences at school and home. Leigh's parents are divorced and his dad is a truck driver and his mother works at a catering business and supports Leigh on her own. Children with divorced parents could relate to this novel. This novel is also very gender neutral. It is not a book that only girls will identify with or only boys.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book when I was in 5th grade and, now having picked it up again I really did not remember it being so deep. Divorce, a strained relationships with parents and just having to move on as things change. To me, this is to boys what Esperanza Rising is to girls. My only complaint about the story is that the in oder to convey Voice to the narrator, the text and tone are dumbed-down (somewhat). That said, there was a lot of potential for a sad story, however, it comes off as a sweet testament to the trials of life. The big idea here is that life doesn't always give us the answers we are looking for in a clear path. Sometimes it takes a while and sometimes we may not really know. Great Book!
  • (4/5)
    In this endearing book, written entirely in letters and journal entries, we meet Leigh Botts, a sixth grader who is going through some big changes in his life. These upheavals are revealed in his letters to Mr. Henshaw, his favorite author. Leigh writes to Mr. Henshaw a couple of times when he is younger, but then in sixth grade he is given the assignment of writing to an author with a series of questions. Of course Leigh chooses Henshaw, but he is surprised with the response. Henshaw does reply, not quite meeting the school's deadline, but his answers are funny and mischievous, and he requires Leigh to answer the same questions that he sent to Henshaw. At first Leigh is irritated - why couldn't his author just answer his questions normally, like the other authors? - but he starts writing, because his mom insists. And as he answers the questions and sends more and more letters to Mr. Henshaw, we learn more about Leigh's life. Such as the fact that his parents have recently separated and are getting a divorce, he and his mom have moved to a new town and he is the new kid at school, and someone is stealing food out of his lunch bag.As Leigh continues his correspondence, and then switches over to a journal (at the prompting of Mr. Henshaw, who we can infer from Leigh's letters is irritable with Leigh for always pestering him with letters, which made me annoyed with his character because Leigh is so clearly looking for a father figure and he is an amazing boy, and why the author doesn't appreciate that more I just can't understand), we see a young boy navigating the rough waters of heart break and loneliness, and proving that he is a smart and ingenious kid who can handle the challenges life throws at him. Leigh comes to accept his parent's divorce even though it continues to make him sad, he buys a new lunch box and devises an alarm to scare off his pesky lunch thief, and he makes a new friend. Leigh is an amazing kid, and I began to root for him from the first letter he wrote. The novel draws the reader in right away, considering the intimacy of the letter format, and it handles its delicate topics with a deft touch that makes them accessible to the intended young readers of the book. I read through this book quickly, enjoyed it a great deal, and only cried a little. It is heartfelt and fantastic, and well deserving of the Newbery award it won.
  • (4/5)
    This was quite an enjoyable re-read. I remember liking this book as a kid, but being a little wary because I thought it was supposed to be a book for boys. I was pleasantly surprised by how much emotional depth Cleary was able to convey in the simple writing and authentic voice of a sixth-grade boy. Leigh is a likeable character and I had a lot of empathy for the struggles he was facing dealing with the divorce of his parents and his struggles making friends in a new school. The characters of his mom and dad were also very realistically portrayed. 1984 Newbery winner.
  • (5/5)
    Woooooooooooooooooo
  • (4/5)
    A profoundly simple and real story about a lonely and isolated boy who starts to write to his favorite author, Boyd Henshaw - he writes back and an unusual friendship by letters is established. Leigh Botts faces several problems - the big one is understanding his parents divorce and coping with an absent dad who seems more interested driving around the country in his truck than in him - another one is how to become a writer - an author - and yet another one is to understand how his lunch is stolen every day. Some funny episodes here. I loved this little gem. With the limited vocabulary and understated style it’s easy to imagine this being the writings of a young boy.
  • (5/5)
    It's no wonder "Dear Mr. Henshaw" won the Newbery Award in 1984. Although an entire book devoted to fan letters and diary entries might not excite some younger readers, Mrs. Cleary somehow makes this book very appealing and relative to children. There are also several illustrations done by Paul O. Zelinksy for those who enjoy drawings and not just writing. I remember reading "Dear Mr. Henshaw" when I was a kid and would highly recommend it to other children and I will defiantly read this book to my students.
  • (4/5)
    A grade 2 assignment leads Leigh Boots to write to his favorite author, Mr. Henshaw. Leigh wants to become a writer like Mr. Henshaw, and so this marks the beginning of a letter-writing relationship that extends into junior high school. During the course of this relationship, Mr. Henshaw encourages Leigh to keep a diary. Through a series of letters and diary entries, Beverly Cleary shares the poignant story of Leigh's struggles growing up: coming to terms with his parent's divorce, a lunch thief, moving to a new school, and not having any friends. Although I missed the tactile experience of holding the book in my hands, George Guidall's soothing narration provided thought-provoking road-trip entertainment. Although the story may seem somewhat dated to modern readers, the themes are universal.
  • (5/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is definitely one of my favorite Newbery titles. I really, really enjoyed it. I listened to it on audio with my 15 year old son, and though he is much older than the target audience, he very much enjoyed it as well.Leigh is a boy whose teacher gives him the assignment of writing to a favorite author. Leigh does and asks Mr. Henshaw some questions required of the assignment. When he gets a letter in response, Mr. Henshaw asks him a set of questions as well. Leigh continues to write Mr. Henshaw and they develop a correspondence over the years. Leigh wants to become a writer, and he asks Mr. Henshaw for writing advice but also tells him of some deeply personal events occurring at home, such as his parents’ divorce.This is an excellent book that can definitely be appreciated by both children and adults, especially if they are struggling with a major life event.Highly recommended.1983, 144 pp.
  • (5/5)
    I believe this is a classic story that many children in today's society can really relate to with the rising divorce rate. The main character is a little boy named Leigh who shares his thoughts and feelings through letters. Leigh speaks on their level, simply looking for someone to reach out to.
  • (4/5)
    This Newbery Award winner of 1984 can still be used to inspire young student writers, children whose parents have difficulty getting along or are divorced, and children who are picked on. The book is structured around what starts out as a correspondence between 6th grader Leigh Botts and a writer that he admires, Mr. Henshaw. When Mr. Henshaw suggests that he can’t keep up a correspondence with the boy, he suggests Leigh keep a journal in which to write his thoughts and ideas. This transition from writing fan letters to keeping a journal where the author becomes less important occurs effectively and believably. Leigh’s observations and expressions of his feelings regarding his parents and ongoing frustrations with his lunch thief sound authentically 6th grade, even though the book is close to being 30 years old. Leigh’s growth and maturation make this story a good choice especially for boys who might have frustrations of their own. It is positive without being sappy. Target audience grades 4-6. Cleary, B., Zelinsky, P. O., & Juvenile Collection (Library of Congress). (1983). Dear Mr. Henshaw. New York: Morrow.
  • (3/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is a story about the pains of growing up- dealing with parents divorcing, new school, making friends and feeling all alone. Beverly Cleary writes this story through the voice of 6th grader, Leigh Botts. The story is composed of letters, written by Leigh to his favorite author, Mr. Henshaw, and his diary entries. We learn that his parents are recently divorced, he lives with his mother, his father is an absentee traveling truck driver, he wants to be a famous author and he misses his dad and dog named Bandit. The time span within the novel is cleverly shown through dates of entries and letters, which make Leigh's experiences realistic. Readers will be able to identify with Leigh's reactions to his circumstances as he sorts out his emotions through writing. The struggles that Leigh encounters are universal and common, whether it be dealing with divorce parents or feeling lonely. Through writing, Leigh vents and processes his experiences- providing possible comfort and outlets for readers experiencing similar issues. The outcome of Leigh's situations are viable; not every story has a fairy tale outcome. Yet, at the end, Leigh does get some type of reconciliation assuring the readers that he will be okay. There is not much humor and little to no suspense or fast action. This book is a bit somber, but worth to have in a collection to help readers find comfort in similar situations.Age Appropriate: 3rd to 6th grade
  • (5/5)
    This book from Beverly Cleary won the Newberry medal in 1984 and talks about a boy named Leigh Botts.Leigh wrote to his favorite author Mr. Henshaw as part of a school assignment and was sent a reply.Leigh was disappointed at Mr. Henshaw's answers and decided to vent out his frustrations and disgust to the author in his letters to him.Mr. Henshaw writes back with some questions for Leigh which he answers because his mother asked him to.Leigh answered all of Mr. Henshaw's questions and gradually liked Mr. Henshaw again.Leigh took the advise of Mr. Henshaw on how to become an author and wrote in his journal to a pretend Mr. Henshaw.When the time came for the students to submit their literary pieces for their school,Leigh ended up writing about a ride with his father.Leigh was also struggling with his parents' divorce and the loneliness he felt when his father did not keep his promise of calling him.Leigh's story caught the attention of the famous author which the students met and she called Leigh an author to his amazement.This is my first book from Beverly Cleary and I really enjoyed reading it and cannot help but cry towards the end of the story.
  • (5/5)
    Endearing story; true to life.good for all children, not just those of divorce, but those who worry about divorce, as so many do. Good for encouraging student journaling.
  • (4/5)
    In this Newberry award winning book by Beverly Cleary, a young boy begins writing back and forth with his favorite author after being assigned to do so by his teacher. At first, the letters are one sided with no response from the author, Mr. Henshaw. The boy, Leigh Botts, is diligent about writing Mr. Henshaw and ulitmately begins to get some response in the form of postcards and a few letters. Leigh relates to Mrs. Henshaw that he wants to become a famous author like him. When asked what he should do to become an author, Mr. Henshaw simply replies, "write!" Mr. Henshaw gives Leigh a set of questions to answer. At first, Leigh is mad because it feels to him like another school assignment. When the family's television breaks, Leigh begrudingly decides to use his time to answer Mr. Henshaw's questions. As Leigh writes letters and answers the questions, it is revealed among other things that he is a young boy dealing with the divorce of his parents. For the remainder of the book, Leigh goes back and forth from writing real lettes to Mr. Henshaw to keeping a diary in which he begins each entry to a pretend Mr. Henshaw. The book concludes with an opportunity for Leigh to meet a real author who in turn calls him an author, and an opportunity to gain some understanding of his relationship with his often unengaged father.I enjoyed reading this book to my daughter who just finished 2nd grade. The format of the book as a series of letters and diary entries was very interesting. My daughter and I could hardly put down the book each night. In fact, we only stopped reading when my daughter fell asleep. We have enjoyed reading many of Beverly Cleary's books. We also feel somewhat of a special connection to her as she has (now grown) twin children (a boy and girl) and my daughter has a twin brother. Cleary does a good job of capturing the thoughts and emotions of a child dealing with real life issues. From dealing with a bully to navigating the relationships in a struggling family, the characters and their interactions seem quite genuine.
  • (3/5)
    In this 1984 Newbery Medal winner, second grade student Lee Botts is given the assignment of writing to his favorite author. He asks questions to Boyd Henshaw and in turn Mr. Henshaw asks questions to Lee.Over the course of four years, as Lee and Mr. Henshaw communicate, Lee learns the power of writing and expressing feelings via words.The sad, lonely, new kid on the block shares his feelings with Mr. Henshaw, and over the course of years, also writes in diary form. As he grapples with his parents divorce, acclimation to a new school and abandonment by his father, Cleary wisely allows us into the thoughts and feelings of a vulnerable young man.While this isn't one of my favorite Newbery winners, it was a pleasant read.
  • (3/5)
    Leigh Botts is given a class assignment to write to his favorite author. Instead of answering all of his questions the author, Mr. Henshaw, asks him to answer some questions about himself. In turn a correspondence between the two ensues and continues over the years. Although it is mostly one sided and Leigh does most of the correspondence, by writing he is able to better cope with life's frustrations and begins to discover who he is.
  • (3/5)
    a story told in letters about a boy trying to deal with his parent's divorce.This is a perfect example of realistic fiction, it could be the same today as when it was written.
  • (5/5)
    This as a great childhood favourite, I was surprised to find that I remembered entire passages. As a boy is forced to write letters to his favourite author, we learn about his life, especially his relationship with his haphazard father.I think that this would still appeal to younger boys, I didn't find it dated at all.