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The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness: The Path to True Christian Joy

The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness: The Path to True Christian Joy

Scritto da Timothy J. Keller

Narrato da Grover Gardner


The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness: The Path to True Christian Joy

Scritto da Timothy J. Keller

Narrato da Grover Gardner

valutazioni:
5/5 (208 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
43 minuti
Pubblicato:
Apr 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781610457248
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

What are the marks of a supernaturally changed heart? This is one of the questions the Apostle Paul addresses as he writes to the church in Corinth. He s not after some superficial outward tinkering, but instead a deep rooted, life altering change that takes place on the inside. In an age where pleasing people, puffing up your ego and building your résumé are seen as the methods to make it , the Apostle Paul calls us to find true rest in blessed self forgetfulness. In this short and punchy book, best selling author Timothy Keller, shows that gospel humility means we can stop connecting every experience, every conversation with ourselves and can thus be free from self condemnation. A truly gospel humble person is not a self hating person or a self loving person, but a self forgetful person. This freedom can be yours...
Pubblicato:
Apr 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781610457248
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Timothy J. Keller is the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York. He is the best-selling author of The Prodigal God and The Reason for God. 

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di The Freedom of Self-Forgetfulness

4.8
208 valutazioni / 18 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    This is a short work that is almost sermon-like in form. The author talks about things such as a shift from belief from believing that overly esteeming oneself was a big problem to believing that low self-esteem was a problem. He argues that self forgetfulness is neither. It's a deliberate attempt to make the self irrelevant. There are several nice sound bites that I suspect people will hear pastors quote in sermons. His main points are presented in such a manner that many pastors will also use the outline and some of the content in sermons.
  • (5/5)
    This is a simple and completely life changing book!!! A must read!!! Get your kids readying it too
  • (5/5)
    This is a great short listen! So manty wise word packed into 45min. If you want to understand your ego and pride, take a listen.
  • (5/5)
    Life Changing!

    Thanks God ???❤️, through this blessed audiobook The Holy Spirit revealed to me a trap that I used to fall every day.Our identity is not affected by others criticism, our self criticism nor even by the good ,bad things we do daily. Everyday we need to be aware of the fact that unconsciously we can be led to daily trials in our own minds : Did I worked enough? Did I study enough? No ,I could be much more productive ,
    (this reflects a sick ego, joy the one designed by our Father in Mark 1:11~ We are His beloved Sons in whom He is well pleased, and that is final! It is not affected by others opinion and the opinion of our deceitful heart~Jeremiah 17:9 Amem, I declare ,in Jesus name , this joyful mind transformation upon your life in such a way you overflow this truth and share it with others wherever you go ??????❤️
  • (5/5)
    Masterful book. One of the books I’ll be reading and listening to over and over again. The narrator did a good job as well. Well produced audiobook. Highly recommend
  • (5/5)
    Short, sweet, and to the point. Very good and insightful book. A lesson on true humility.
  • (4/5)
    Short and well written. It is forty-something minutes very well spent.
  • (1/5)
    Science washed groundless soap boxing. Go to source texts instead
  • (5/5)
    Great perspective on judgment and trials! Gave me a different light on my life
  • (5/5)
    I love this book. I have listened this several times. It explains exactly how to follow Jesus truly. It does not matter how I look and you look at me but only how Jesus does. I can be out of my life-long prison of self-aggrandization by learning self-forgetfulness. Thank you, Tim.
  • (2/5)

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

    Not sure what to make of this effort from the widely acclaimed Tim Keller. It is the first book I have read by the author due to being warned away from him by someone who shall remain nameless.

    I agree with him in principle that self-forgetfulness is a worthy goal for a Christian and that we could all do with a greater focus on others rather than ourselves. However, suggesting that we should not care at all what people think of us could lead to a lack of accountability or the encouragement of an independent spirit that goes where it pleases having apparently received special revelation from God. Iron sharpens iron and we need our Christian brothers and sisters to keep us on track. I think the author is trying to make the point that we should primarily pay attention to what God wants rather than what others say, but surely God uses others to guide and direct us.....

    I also wasn't impressed with his admiration of Madonna due to her work ethic....

    This is a small booklet and it's difficult to make a proper assessment after such a short read. I'm reading another of Keller's books now so watch this space!

    2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    Such a great little booklet. Dr. Keller shows what Paul taught about the issue of self-esteem and how to finally find peace with yourself.
  • (4/5)
    I finished this book more than a week ago and I'm STILL thinking about it.

    SO. GOOD.

    I can't even imagine what it would be like to never even consider MYSELF. To just always be thinking about other people, and of course, Jesus. Totally freeing, but of course, totally difficult! We are (I am) so self-absorbed!
  • (5/5)
    This book is short and profoundly challenging. The simplicity of the message will rattle around in the tombs of our soiled memories.

    Tim Keller looks at our condition in this inflated/deflated world. The world is flat and black and white; while we perform in our shadowed reality. There is only one way to the truth and the light. We find ourselves off the beaten track and lost. Until, we are picked up for hitch-hiking.
    We are then brought to a trial room with only the smiling mob and the Court Jester. Every day we wake to a trial, much like the trial of the main character in Franz Kafka's The Trial.
    We find that all the jurors are pointing at us and laughing at our hopeless condition, because we still think we can save ourselves. We think that there is a away for us to justify our actions. We cower at our reflected image and our ballooned ego lets out a gasp and we find ourselves thinner than Jack Sprat.
    Where is your heart (insert your name here)? is the first question the Supreme Court Jester asks.
    We say in response, "I played the game! I played by the rules! How can you accuse me of being a loser on my own?"
    The Jester replies, "Who do you want to be son, than be that person."
    We wake up and the trial resumes.
    Keller shows us how to break out of this fun house mirror and self delusion through the reliance of Christ. This book must be read by anyone who struggles with depression or anxiety in the modern world.
  • (4/5)
    good, this is along the lines also of Luther on Freedom of a Christian. It's the gospel.
  • (5/5)
    This is an excellent little book that gets to the heart of the Gospel. It is freeing and an excellent reminder of what it means to live out of the life that we have in Christ rather than the life we are trying to make for ourselves in our own skin. We do not have to build up a positive self-image, or degrade ourselves into a negative view of who we are, rather we ought to take the perspective that we are in God and nothing else matters. It doesn't matter what other think about us and it doesn't matter what we think of ourselves, all that matters is what God says and he calls us beautiful beloved children, because when he looks at us all he sees is Jesus.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    A very quick read. The basic premise being that our society sees sin as being rooted in low self-esteem, while other cultures generally see too high an opinion of oneself as the problem. In actual fact, both of these are wrong. We should instead be self-forgetful. Focussing on God and others over ourselves. He offers a thorough argument from 1 Corinthians as well as suggestions how to work towards such an attitude. An excellent book.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    You only have two eyes and two ears, and they only point in one direction. If you are focused on the sin in your life, then you can’t be looking at God, can you? This has always been one of the foundational aspects of my thinking about the spiritual life, or life as a Christian. There is a time to repent of sin, there is a time to mourn over the things we’ve done, but if our focus takes God out of view, then we are looking in the wrong direction. Timothy Keller, in this short volume, applies this same concept to the idea of self-worth. If we are looking at ourselves, either for good or for evil, then we are looking in the wrong direction. He begins with a short introduction on the concept of self-esteem, and our modern culture’s strong attachment to self. He examines the nature of this attachment, showing how almost every problem, every issue, is always somehow tied back to low self-esteem in modern thinking. From this point he moves into a Biblical view of self-esteem, keying off Paul’s statements about pride in 1 Corinthians 3:21-4:7. He uses Paul’s words to diagnose the state of the human ego, empty and bloated, painful and empty, fragile. What is the solution? This is where Keller truly shines: the answer is to forget yourself. Focus on others (or rather, focus on God), but stop thinking about yourself at all. Stop caring about what other people think about you, and focus on what God thinks about you. Don’t try to set your own standards (as the author says, this is a trap!), but focus on God’s standards.For anyone struggling with the spiritual life, this is one of those books you should read. You should read it even if you aren’t struggling with spiritual life.