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Mongoliad, The: Book One

Mongoliad, The: Book One


Mongoliad, The: Book One

valutazioni:
4/5 (46 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
13 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 24, 2012
ISBN:
9781455868186
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Fusing historical events with a gripping fictional narrative, this first book in the Mongoliad trilogy reveals a secret history of Europe in the thirteenth century.

As the Mongols swept across Asia and were poised to invade Europe in 1241, a small band of warriors, inheritors of an ancient secret tradition, conceived a desperate plan to stop the attack. They must kill the Khan of Khans; if they fail, all of Christendom will be destroyed.

In the late nineteenth century a mysterious group of English martial arts aficionados provided Sir Richard F. Burton, well-known expert on exotic languages and historical swordsmanship, a collection of long-lost manuscripts to translate-the lost chronicles of this desperate fight to save Europe. Burton's translations were lost, until a team of amateur archaeologists discovered them in the ruins of a mansion in Trieste. From the translations and from the original source material, the epic tale of The Mongoliad was recreated.

Pubblicato:
Apr 24, 2012
ISBN:
9781455868186
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Neal Stephenson is the bestselling author of the novels Reamde, Anathem, The System of the World, The Confusion, Quicksilver, Cryptonomicon, The Diamond Age, Snow Crash, and Zodiac, and the groundbreaking nonfiction work In the Beginning . . . Was the Command Line. He lives in Seattle, Washington.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I picked this book up solely on the basis of Stephenson's name on the cover; without it, I'm sure I would've walked on by a sword epic with too many writers on the cover. That would have been a mistake, and I would've missed out on an engaging history lesson on something glossed over in my schooling; the Mongol takeover of Asia and Europe.

    The Mongol Empire, by land area, was the largest empire in human history. Since we tend now to think of the time between Rome and the Renaissance as an unchanging Dark Age, we forget that once all of Europe was either under the thumb of, or in fear of, the Great Khan. This story drops the reader right in the middle of that period, as Eastern Europe begins to suffer terribly under the attacks of the Horde.

    A group of Christian (but secretly pagan) knights is looking for a way to save the people of Europe from more suffering. A rumor of a fine point of Mongol law gives the knight's leader an idea...

    At the same time, a young fighter in Mongolia is torn from the steppes and installed in the court of the Great Khan, and must learn diplomacy quickly if he's to live.

    I've been reading experimental novels and comics all year. It's nice to sit down with a novel with a familiar structure, with a good story and solid history behind it. This was a quick, fun read.
  • (2/5)
    Decent. Nothing particularly amazing, but the writing was tight and the characters relatively interesting. Not sure I'm hooked enough to continue.
  • (3/5)
    Impression 30% through the book? Editing makes a HUGE difference. I subscribed to the Foreworld project for a year, but I got bogged down in chapter four and couldn't get restarted. I started it over using the iPad app to read the web version, but again I got bogged down in too many plot lines. I couldn't keep track of the characters and thus couldn't really care what happened to them.

    Then I bought the Kindle version (not while it was .99, sadly) and this time the story-lines are curated in a way that keeps my attention. The Mongoliad is a project about authoring and writing as much as it is a finished project and one thing I think it demonstrates clearly is that stories may move from the beginning to the end, but they aren't written that way and a good editor can make the difference between something that never quite gets off the ground and a rewarding tale. Even when the books are essentially the same content.

    *********************************

    Impression upon reaching the end: the book isn't finished, but neither am I finished with these characters. I'm invested in them and their story lines. So much so that I'm annoyed that there wasn't any resolution or climax. Back to editing, I think everything worked except the packaging as a novel. This is a serial work in progress. The last page contained no satisfying conclusion or cliff hanger, the story just stopped. That was a bit abrupt and jarring, but only when I think of it as a novel. When I think of how it is being written, that makes perfect sense.

    Now, I think I'm going to resubscribe to the Foreworld project so I can read the new chapters as they come out.

  • (3/5)
    This is a really tough one to review. Mongoliad is a serial novel which was produced interactively as part of a transmedia franchise. According to the website, it's "sort of the thing that Charles Dickens wrote, but with a decidedly 21st century twist", emphasizing the role of social media and community resources in the project's idea and creation.I have to say the serialized format and the multiple authors both facilitated and hindered my enjoyment. Not surprisingly, the novel did not always feel cohesive. There are sections of the novel that are beautifully written, paid attention to character development, etc. and those were the sections I found I really liked.On the other hand, there were also those sections in which style changes are more obvious, quality of the storytelling was not as high, and chapters where more attention (like pages and pages) was paid to fighting styles and weapons than the actual protagonists utilizing and wielding them. Apparently, Mongoliad and the Foreworld universe came about from a group of friends' shared interest in the study of Western Martial Arts, so that's understandable.If that's your thing, you'll find plenty to like in this novel. If not, you'll probably go through ups and downs like me. I generally prefer a good story with ample character building. There are so many characters, and it always seemed like just when I wanted to know more, the book changes to another scene or switches perspective, leaving me hanging. There was just enough in book one to keep me intrigued and interested in picking up book two.
  • (2/5)
    At the start I was eagerly reading this because the premise of the story was a selling point. But halfway through I just lost interest in the characters and by the end of the story the storyline was boring.
  • (4/5)
    This is a good light read, if a little grim and gory in places. The writing is remarkably cohesive for the number of authors involved. Good beach reading. The ending is a total cliffhanger though. Some of the battle scenes were a little annoying because they went on for so long and it's hard to describe swordfighting action in prose.
  • (4/5)
    Overall pretty good! Very well written, likable characters, especially Feronantus and his knights. I took off a star and a half for being a tad slow in places, mostly during the Mongolian chapters. I am looking forward to reading the sequel!
  • (5/5)
    Great book - not that I was surprised taking into account its authors. The only downside is that when you reach the last page and turn it, you really expect the rest of the story to be there... And, instead, you're left simply with the need to pre-order Book Two.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this. Lot's of historical detail, fighting and blood. None of the mushy stuff to ruin it either. Totally recommend.
  • (4/5)
    A secret order of knights battles the Mongol empire in thirteenth century Europe.