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Over In the Meadow

Over In the Meadow

Scritto da John Langstaff

Narrato da John Langstaff


Over In the Meadow

Scritto da John Langstaff

Narrato da John Langstaff

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (108 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
14 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2004
ISBN:
9780545258548
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

John Langstaff's endearing version of an old counting song for children is filled with the beauty and wonder of meadow life.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2004
ISBN:
9780545258548
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

The late John Langstaff was known internationally for his ability to unlock any child’s innate musical ability. He was the founder of the original Christmas Revels in 1971 and devoted his life to promoting music education and enjoyment, especially for children. 


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4.4
108 valutazioni / 143 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    This entertaining tail Farmer Brown's cows who happen to find an old typewriter in the barn one day. They decided to type a list of demands they want met or they will go on strike. This humorous story teaches the art of negotiation and compromise. Caldecott Honor Book. Great read for all ages.
  • (5/5)
    This book is hilarious. The cows have an electric typewriter so they make demands on Farmer Brown by typing a note to him. Then the hens do the same thing! Along comes a neutral party--the duck, The outcome is not what you might suspect. I think it would be great fun to read this book to a preschooler because the ideas are silly, the illustrations are terrific, and the story introduces quite a few ideas to discuss. In addition, you can explain to a preschooler what a typewriter is before they all completely disappear! :D
  • (4/5)
    Cows that type?! Hens on strike?! Whoever heard of such things, wonders Farmer Brown, as he deals with the messages left for him by his herd of cows, informing him that they want electric blankets for the cold... and that the chickens do as well! Using the neutral Duck as a negotiator, farmer and animals negotiate, until a compromise is reached. Unfortunately for the farmer, the typewriter falls into the hands of the ducks next...Originally published in 2000, and chosen as a Caldecott Honor Book in 2001, Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type is a hilariously entertaining picture-book romp! I would imagine that young listeners will get quite a few giggles out of Farmer Brown's outraged incredulity (I know I did!), and will enjoy following along as the cows negotiate better living conditions. The artwork by Betsy Lewin builds on the madcap humor of the text perfectly, and is very appealing. Recommended to young children who enjoy stories with a silly sense of humor.
  • (4/5)
    This one I really enjoyed. The cows and the farmer having a stalemate and the ducks brokering a peace agreement. Cute, funny and quick this is an enjoyable tale.
  • (5/5)
    HILARIOUS! FURTHER DISCUSSED IN VISUAL LITERACY ASSIGNMENT
  • (5/5)
    Click, Clack, Moo, cows that type is such a great fun book. I love the imagination that it teaches the children that anything can happen. Cows don't really type but it would be interesting if they did.
  • (5/5)
    Growing up, this was my FAVORITE book to read with my grandpa. This book is great for children grades K-3 as a read-aloud or independent read. I would use this book for a lesson on onomatopoeia because the words "click" and "clack" actually sound like what a typewriter sounds like. I could also use this book for a lesson on writing letters because the ducks and cows write the farmer letters.i think the kids would like this book because it is funny and is short enough to where students will not get bored when reading it.
  • (4/5)
    This book is full of wit and fun animal characters. As the animals write letters to get what they desire from Farmer Brown, this book could be used to discuss persuasive writing.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this book because of the humor! First, the story was told from the point of view of the cows made it different than the usual human perspective in lots of children's books. The plot was the second thing that I liked about the book, there was conflict between the cows and the farmer, which kept a feeling of humorous tension throughout the story. There was no real moral or big idea, but I would have to say if anything that animals shouldn't be taken advantage of and they have needs and wants too!
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This children's story is about these cows and hens that do not like how they are living. They are all cold at night and they decide to type up a letter which they tell the farmer that they want electric blankets or they will not give any milk or eggs. The farmer gets so mad and refuses to give them what they want. In the end, the farmer asks to trade the typewriter for the blankets which works until the duck gets ahold of the typewriter...Review:This is a very popular children's book because it is consistently funny, very imaginative, and clever. This book is aimed directly for kids, but a great thing about it is, adults appreciate and love the story too. The whole letter writing can definitely be linked into a writing lesson for elementary school students.
  • (5/5)
    I would use this story to model the rhyming going on in the story and how we can use it in our own writing.
  • (4/5)
    I would use this book to teach how authors give context clues to decode the meanings of words. This book is also great to teach character traits setting point of view and conflict and solution comprehension skills. This book also shows how inportant and meaningful a letter can be. writers write to be heard by others .
  • (4/5)
    Filled with wit and humor, this is a cute story about compromising that will engage the children.
  • (4/5)
    Hilarious! I enjoyed this silly tale of literate cows and their typing frenzy. Kids will enjoy the sound-words and adults will enjoy the farm yard antics. Highly recommend.
  • (5/5)
    I like this book because of how silly and funny it is. I think the personification that they gave the animals was the funniest part. The cows were typing and demanding blankets and at the end of the story the ducks started typing and demanding a diving board. The irony was also funny. Farmer Brown went through all of that trouble to get his cows and chickens to work again. When he finally gives in, the ducks then start to go on strike as well. This story will attract younger students because of the catchy rhymes. For example, "click clack moo, click clack moo, clickety clack moo".
  • (5/5)
    Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin and illustrated by Betsy Lewis is a cute parody of Animal Farm aimed at the 4 to 8 set.Farmer Brown's dairy cattle go on strike after their typewritten demands aren't met. Soon the chickens follow suit and the farmer is told via a note: "Closed. No milk. No eggs." (p. 13)Cronin's funny story with a rhyming scheme that mimics the sound of an old manual typewriter is paired perfectly with Betsy Lewis's illustrations and the wobbly Courieresque lettering completes the illusion of novices typing on antique equipment.Unlike Orwell's Animal Farm, the animals don't actually take over the farm to set up their own co-op. The cows, as far as I can tell, don't become the party leaders over a farm animal proletariat duped into over throwing one master for another. Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type is less about revolution and more about labor negotiations.The ducks, though, they might be planning something.
  • (5/5)
    Review: This is one of my favorite books growing up. I really enjoy the large pictures and the use of repetitive words. It's an easier read for children and is also funny. Summary:This story is about Farmer Brown's cows. They found an old typewriter in their barn. The repetitive phrase in the the story is Click, Clack, Moo. Click, Clack, Moo. Clickety, Clack, Moo. Farmer Brown does not believe that the cows could actually be typing! He realizes that it truly is the cows and is amazed. They send him a letter telling him that the barn is cold and they could like some electric blankets. Farmer Brown does not think that they need electric blankets so he tells them no and the cows decide to go on strike. They do so by claiming that they will not provide milk for the day. The hens join in on the strike when the cows are still refused blankets. They exclaim "No milk or eggs today". Farmer Brown writes a letter back saying that he demands eggs and milk. This letter is delivered by a duck who acts as the mediator. Eventually, the farmer and the cows reach an agreement- the farmer will give the cows electric blankets if they give him the typewriter. The hens and the cows fall asleep with their warm blankets but the typewriter has disappeared; his only clue is when he hears "Click, Clack, Quack!" the next morning!
  • (4/5)
    Hilarious and creative, this was a fun read. Farmer Brown's problems begin when his cows find a manual typewriter and discover how to use the keyboard.Posting various notes throughout the farm for Farmer Brown, they at first demand warm blankets when it is cold.Then, the chickens get in out the demands. All too soon Farmer Brown has a farm with no milk or eggs.The ducks, previously neural arbitrate so that the farm can run smoothly.The cow's will give up the typewriter in return for warm blankets. Then, the ducks, bored with their little pond, find power and demand a diving board.The illustrations are humorous, the text brings a smile to the reader, and this silly book is a bright, sunny tale of empowerment gone amok.
  • (5/5)
    I love the illustrations in this book! Farmer Brown's problem begin when his cows learn to type and start leaving him notes around the farm.
  • (5/5)
    Love these books. My 4-year-old was reading through all the moos!
  • (4/5)
    Cows that type, particularly in protest, are just fun.
  • (4/5)
    I thought "Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type" by Doreen Cronin was really fun book. I thought Betsy Lewin's illustrations of the cows and their love for note writing made the text even funnier. I enjoyed the back and forth arguments to the farmer's frustration and the fact that the author made the ducks a "neutral party", especially when it leads to them getting. I thought the author's theme of standing up for you rights was delivered in a hilarious way.
  • (5/5)
    Another favorite read-aloud for preschoolers and young readers. This quirky book is laugh out loud funny. Animal sounds and the title phrase will be repeated by listeners. Emotions are clearly illustrated. The funny ending is well illustrated in the final page. Allusion, onomatopoeia, and irony are used in the story. The illustrations definitely add to and improve the story.One could discuss compromise by using this book. I find it simply highly entertaining and a popular pick for young readers and storytime use. Recommended for school and public library collections.
  • (5/5)
    This book teaches children the concept of problem and solution. The farmer has a problem because the cows keep typing and won't give him any milk. He solves the problem by giving them a heating blanket to keep them warm. Although this is fantasy is shows children ways you can solve problems as well as that you need to make your animals happy. The book shows children that you need to take the feelings of your animals into consideration. You must treat them well and meet their needs. The book also shows onomatopoeia to students.
  • (5/5)
    In this book the author leads us on a journey of the animals battling the farmer through letters they are typing on a typewriter. This book makes every reader laugh as the pictures give you a real glimpse into the cows and ducks world. The author even goes as far to say on one page "The ducks waited outside by the barn all night, but not one could understand moo". The main idea that a reader could take from this is to be happy and comfortable you need to help those around you to be happy and comfortable.
  • (5/5)
    Joy! Oh this was so hysterically absurd, but in a great way. I loved the illustrations with their variations on colors. The cows were just so funny. Farmer Brown was a good sport, and the duck was neutral to the whole thing. I say good work!
    Cheers and Happy Reading Kids!
  • (5/5)
    This book really draws on imagination and humor. The cows in this story take on "human-like" characteristics where they use a typewriter and send their farmer different messages about what they want. Like, an electric blanket for instance. The cows decide that since they are giving the farmer their milk that they should be compensated. Kids of several ages would find the unrealistic attributes of this book very funny. Also, a lot of repetition and modeling in this book. I really liked this book because of it's humor.
  • (4/5)
    Funny book for children to read. Click Clack, Moo Cows That Type is about some cows that live in a farm and demand stuff from the farmer by typing up letter and sending them to him, all in order for them to live a better farm life.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about mischievous farm animals that are causing Farmer Brown trouble. The animals have demands like blankets and pizza and let Farmer Brown know via typed letters. This is a humorous book that will have students laughing. I like this story because it can allow for fun conversations in the classroom like if animals really can talk or communicate.
  • (4/5)
    Click Clack Moo Cows That Type is written by Doreen Cronin and illustrated by Betsy Lewin. It tells a story of Farmer Brown and his cows. His cows find a typewriter in their barn, and begin sending demands to Farmer Brown. Farmer Brown eventually catches on and sends them a letter back, telling them that they are cows and they should not be demanding anything. I like this book because the cows are funny as they try and command things that cows do not normally. This text might function as a mentor text in discussing with young children characters as well as character traits.