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Strega Nona

Strega Nona

Scritto da Tomie dePaola

Narrato da Peter Hawkins


Strega Nona

Scritto da Tomie dePaola

Narrato da Peter Hawkins

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (70 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
26 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1978
ISBN:
9780545416948
Formato:
Audiolibro

Nota del redattore

In memoriam…

Beloved author and illustrator Tomie dePaola bewitched generations of children (and their parents) with more than 270 books, including stories of a kindly witch (and an overflowing pot of pasta) in his Strega Nona series. DePaola died March 30 at the age of 85.

Descrizione

Strega Nona's meddling assistant Big Anthony is determined to prove to the townspeople his knowledge of the magic secrets contained in the pasta pot of Strega Nona. In so doing, he unleashes a torrent of pasta which threatens to engulf their little Italian town.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1978
ISBN:
9780545416948
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Tomie dePaola is the author and/or illustrator of more than 250 books for children. He receive a Caldecott Honor for Strega Nona and a Newbery Honor for 26 Fairmont Avenue. He is also the recipient of the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for his substantial and lasting contributions to children's literature. He lives in New London, New Hampshire. Visit his website at www.tomie.com.


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4.4
70 valutazioni / 73 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    Strega Nona has a wonderful pasta pot that will make all the pasta she wants, but when she hires Big Anthony to help her, he starts making pasta and can’t stop. She comes back and saves the day, and Big Anthony has to eat the leftovers as punishment.
  • (4/5)
    How great this is depends on if the story of the overfilling pot is new to you or not (like, I probably first heard it 30 years or more before I encountered the book, so it's less exciting to me, whereas my kid's ma first encountered it through this book, so it's quite exciting to her!), but it's pretty great.
  • (4/5)
    A classic folktale about listening to those who are in control and know more. While I understand that viewpoint, I also believe in proper education and engendering trust. Obviously, the entirety of this story could have been avoided by properly apprenticing Big Antony instead of shutting him out. While it should teach lessons about not eavesdropping or overstepping boundaries or abusing power, I feel like if she'd simply taught Big Antony from the beginning of their relationship, so much destruction and hardship could have been avoided.
  • (4/5)
    We aren't as huge Tomie dePaola fans as many people we know seem to be, but we did enjoy this book enough that it received multiple readings before we returned it to the library. My kids also enjoyed the Scholastic video that includes this story.
  • (4/5)
    Here's a good example of making the punishment fit the crime! :)
  • (4/5)
    Strega Nona means "grandma which" and is the story of a small village that is almost over run with pasta when Strega Nona's helper ignores her warnings and decides to show off her magic pot to the villiagers.
  • (5/5)
    Strega Nona can do amazing things with her magic pasta pot! The villagers come to Strega Nona for advice and her pot holds all the answers! A funny story that will keep the littles entertained. Would love to make a classroom magic pasta pot to use when someone needs advice!
  • (5/5)
    Manners are important!
  • (4/5)
    Strega Nona uses magic and potions to heal the local villagers. She hires Anthony to help her take care of everything, and he sees Strega Nona using her magic pasta pot. When Strega Nona leaves town, her only rule is to not touch the pasta pot. But when the towns people don't believe Anthony that Strega Nona has a magic pot, he tries to use it, and trouble results.I thought this was a cute book and teaches kids in a fun way what happens when you dont listen to the directions an adult tells you.Teaching Extension: (from WeREAD at U of M)Have kids create their own spells that rhyme like Strega Nona's magic pasta pot spell.
  • (5/5)
    Strega Nona is a witch doctor who needs help taking care of her house. She hires Big Anthony to help. One day Big Anthony sees Strega Nona using her magic pasta pot. Strega Nona has warned him to NEVER touch the pot, but he wants to be a hero and feed the townspeople so when she goes out one day he uses the pot. He cannot shut it off and ends up flooding the town with pasta. The book is hilarious with Big Anthony needing to eat an enormous amount of spaghetti at the end of the book. The illustration at the end is incredibly expressive. He is clearly painfully full, and though he has a pained expression it still manages to be drawn in a way that also makes the reader laugh. Strega Nona was one of my favorite books as a child and it did not disappoint me reading it as an adult. I always loved looking at the illustrations with the peacock and bunny that show up randomly throughout the book. The book has a simple message to teach, and it is a good resource to teach it: it is important to listen and follow direction as bad things can happen when you don't.
  • (3/5)
    Strega Nona has amazing powers but needs help around her house. She then hires Anthony to do chorus that she is not able to do. One day Anthony sees Strega Nona make pasta out of magic, and goes to town to brag about it. The towns people do not believe him, so Anthony sets out to prove he's telling the truth. But, Anthony is not to touch the pasta pot, because it is Strega Nona special tool. Instead of listening Anthony makes the pasta for the town, but does not have the most important ingredient.
  • (5/5)
    Strega Nona is one of my favorite children's books ever. It's a vivid and interesting story, Strega Nona is about a helpful old woman who shows generosity to a man named Big Anthony. The story is about what happens when Big Anthony takes advantage of her. There are lessons about trust, honesty and the importance of paying attention.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the magic pot of pasta!!!! The kids also love this book
  • (5/5)
    My students love the story of Strega Nona, an old magic witch who is the medicine woman of her little Italian village, and her hapless assistant, Big Anthony. In this story, the original in the series, Strega Nona has a magic pasta pot, which when she sings to it, makes its own pasta. One day she leaves Big Anthony with instructions not to bother the pasta pot, but his curiosity gets the better of him, and an avalanche of pasta is the funny result. Classroom connection could include following directions, and consequences.
  • (5/5)
    In this retelling of an old tale, Strega Nona has magical powers and a magical pot. Strega Nona, which means Grandma Witch, can cure headaches, help girls get husbands, and even get rid of warts. Now that Stega Nona is getting older she requires some help around her house and hires a young boy named Big Anthony. One evening while doing his chores, Big Anthongy overhears Strega Nona singing to a pot and sees it magically make pasta. Big Anthony, having thought that he saw and heard the magical spell, tries to give it a shot for himself. However, he had missed the part where Strega Nona blew the pot a kiss and now the pot won't stop making pasta. At first the townspeople are thrilled to see all of the pasta but when it takes over, the entire village begins to worry. Fortunately, Strega Nona is able to save the day by blowing the pot a kiss and stopping it from making any more pasta. The townspeople call to have Big Anthony strung up, but Strega Nona suggests that the punishment fit the crime and tells Big Anthony to eat up all the pasta. A picture of a very full Big Anthony is pictured at the end of the story. There is no mention or citation of the original source for the folktale. The plot is simple and direct and is sure to be enjoyed by students in grades K-3. The illustrations are warm and there is plenty of humor to attract children and adults alike.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a Caldecott Honor Book that is appropriate for the grades pre-k through third. The book is filled with pictures and is not too long. The story is about Strega Nona, a witch who takes care of her town with magic. Strega Nona is getting old and so she decides to hire Big Anthony to take care of her house work. Her only rule is that he must not touch the pasta pot. One day Big Anthony sees Strega Nona use the pasta pot to make dinner. He brags to the town and shows off the pasta pot when she is out of town but he does not know how to stop the pot from making pasta. At the end, as a punishment Strega Nona makes him eat all the pasta out of the town. Uses in the classroom:-Discuss the moral of the story which is that we shouldn't touch things that we are told not to.- Have children make a text to world connection. Have them discuss a time when they touched something they were not supposed to and got in trouble.-As a fun activity I would give children a picture of a pot and have them draw a food that the pot will make. Something that they would never get sick of.
  • (4/5)
    1970 Book, Other 1970 Title Frog and Toad are Friends Strega Nona is an Italian retold tale about the universal theme that young people should obey direct orders; in this case, Anthony was not supposed to play with a magical pot in the kitchen. The main character gets in trouble in town because he played with a magical pot in the kitchen he had been warned not to touch. The book received a Caldecott Medal for the art illustrations. I enjoyed the ancient looking pictures of ancient building and old costumes used in a different era. The story includes illustrations of Catholic priests and nuns. On some pages, the artist uses several illustrations per page to explain the rising action in the story. The art captures the simplicity in which children view the world around them. The main character learns his lesson as he finds he must pay negative consequences for his misbehavior. He created a massive amount of pasta with a magical pot, and in the end he must eat all of the pasta so that things may return to how they were. Ages: 4-8
  • (5/5)
    Strega nona has a magic pot that makes pasta. Her helper Anthony uses her magical song to make pasta, but does not do the final step:blow three kisses. The town is overflowed with pasta, and Anthony must eat it all as punishment for using the pasta. This is cute tale that can remind children to always listen. I could use this book for story time, or I could use it when teaching about different folklore tales from around the world.
  • (4/5)
    Tomie dePaola is pillar of the picture book world. His stories are well written and his illustrations are superb. Strega Nona is one of his earlier books, and Strega Nona herself becomes a recurring character in his work. This story introduces that benevolent woman, who is part medicine woman, part grandma, part village elder, and part witch. Really. the villagers don't know how to categorize her, but they do know that she can cure headaches or remove warts or make love potions, and they love her and her special gifts. Strega Nona
  • (5/5)
    This story is one of Tomie dePaola's greatest hits. The story kicks off my Author unit to introduce his family. The story lends students an idea of what happens wihen they don't listen or don't follow the rules. I use it to teach the rules.
  • (4/5)
    Big Anthony almost covers his village with pasta when he uses a spell on Strega Nona's magic pasta pot that he doesn't understand. Good, witchy Italian fun.
  • (4/5)
    A delightful story about an elderly woman who likes to help out her fellow villagers. When Strega Nona leaves, Big Anthony mischievously uses her magic pasta pot, but does not know how to turn it off. He ends up flooding the town with pasta, and must eat it all as a punishment.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:Strega Nona, is an old witch that can cure all the people in her village. Strega Nona needs help around the house, so she advertises for a helper. Big Anthony gets the job and finds her magic pot. He runs to tell the townspeople that he has found a pot that will make sure no one goes hungry, but they turn him away. To prove his point, he says the magic words and the pot start producing pasta. Unfortunately, he forgets to blow the 3 kisses afterwards and the pot continues to make the pasta. After it makes it into town, Strega Nona commands the pot to stop making pasta, and tells Big Anthony, his punishment is to eat all the pasta.Personal:I liked this book because of the meaning behind the story. If you do something wrong, you must face the consequences and learn from your mistakes.Classroom:I would have the students write about a time when they didn't listen to their parents and paid the consequence for it.I would also make it a pasta day. We would have pasta for lunch and talk about pasta, while on an Italian themed lesson plan.
  • (5/5)
    "Strega Nona" is a classic story by Tomie dePaola. Strega Nona (which means "Grandma Witch") has a magical touch that can cure things and make things happen. When Strega Nona puts up an advertisement for help with maintaining her house and garden, Big Anthony responds to the job offer. While working one afternoon, Big Anthony witnesses something magical - Strega Nona made an empty pot fill with pasta. Big Anthony goes to town to brag to people about the pasta pot and tells them that he is going to show them it one day. Big Anthony has the perfect opportunity to live up to his words when Strega Nona goes to visit her friend. He makes the pot fill with pasta and he feeds everyone in the town. His newfound hero status does not last as the pasta pot boils over and pasta begins to take over the city. Strega Nona returns home just in time to stop the pasta by giving the pot three kisses (something Big Anthony had not witnessed her do before). While the town called for Big Anthony to be strung up, Strega Nona proposed a different punishment - he had to eat all the pasta himself."Strega Nona" is a great story for teaching children about the importance of trust and responsibility. It shows that there are consequences to betraying someone's trust and not doing what you are supposed to do. The illustrations are wonderful and the story is unique.
  • (5/5)
    This is an amazing story, written by the much-loved author, Tomie De Paola, about an old woman, a naughty boy, a magic pasta pot, and a lesson about what happens when you use things that you've been warned not to. It will have you reaching for some pasta of your own by the end!
  • (5/5)
    Tomie dePaola's Strega Nona is soon to be a family favorite. An original folk-tale inspired by classical Italian folk-tales, Strega Nona follows a Big Anthony as he comes to work for the beloved town witch, Strega Nona. Strega Nona is renowned in her town for being able to cure headache, help single women find husbands and ridding people of warts but no one knows of her secret pasta pot. It is Big Anthony's job to keep house for the aging Strega Nona. One day while going about his chores, Big Anthony finds the old witch singing to a large pot. When finished with her song, the most delicious smelling pasta begins to flow from it. Big Anthony was so excited to share the news. Soon the opportunity came and when Strega Nona left the town to visit her friend, Strega Amelia, Big Anthony invited everyone to witness the magic of the pot and enjoy the wonderful pasta. Pasta flowed and the people of the town enjoyed a wonderful feast. Big Anthony was sure he knew how to stop the pasta from flowing but unfortunately had not stuck around to see the final step: blowing three Italian kisses. Thus, the pasta continued to flow and soon took over the city. Just then Strega Nona returned, turned the magic pasta pot off but refused to take care of the mess of pasta herself. Instead, she left it to Big Anthony who had so wanted to enjoy the pasta himself. You can only imagine the stomach ache he must have by the end of this comical tale!
  • (4/5)
    This book has great descriptive pictures, and it was written very well. It is about a boy and how he does not listen to Strega nona. By not listening something really bad happens and he has to deal with the consequences by himself. I recommend this book to any teacher, it is just a funny book to read to children.
  • (3/5)
    This is about a lady named Stega Nona who has a magic pot. A boy name Anothony comes to live with her. He helps her to do the house work ans in return he gets a house to stay in. But, she said he must never touch the pot. One day he saw her say a few words over the pot and pasta started coming out of it. He thought he could do it but did not see all she did to the pot. So he took it into town and said the words and it worked but it did not stop. It was covering the town. Finally Stega Nona came and got it to stop. This was a very funy book that you could use when you are talking about doing that right thing even when no one is looking.
  • (4/5)
    Strega Nona is a wonderful folk-tale about a magic pasta pot. Big Anthony thinks he has discovered Strega Nona's secret when he sees the pasta pot making pasta on its own, but as he soon finds out, there is more to the magical pasta pot than he realizes! This is a darling book filled with Italian words and culture and of course PASTA!
  • (4/5)
    Strega Nona is an old tale that is about an elderly lady who lives in a village. All of the villagers refer to her as a witch because of all the different ailments she can treat. When she gets too old to take care of her place, she hires Big Anthony to help. She gives him his list of things to do around the house and instructs him never to touch the pasta pot. But after seeing what the pasta pot can do, he cannot help himself. As soon as Strega Nona leaves, he gets himself into a predicament that only Strega Nona can help solve.I thought this was a nice story that taught a good lesson. I enjoyed to pastels that were used in the pictures as well.I would use this in my classroom to emphasize leaving other people's things alone, and always following instructions.