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Bridge to Terabithia

Bridge to Terabithia


Bridge to Terabithia

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (363 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
3 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780061126093
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Nota del redattore

Powers of imagination…

This Newbury Award-winning classic is worth revisiting, if for its healing powers of imagination in the face of unfathomable tragedy alone.

Descrizione

Jess Aarons' greatest ambition is to be the fastest runner in his grade. He's been practicing all summer and can't wait to see his classmates' faces when he beats them all. But on the first day of school, a new girl boldly crosses over to the boys' side and outruns everyone.

That's not a very promising beginning for a friendship, but Jess and Leslie Burke become inseparable. Together, they create Terabithia, a magical kingdom in the woods where the two of them reign as king and queen, and their imaginations set the only limits. Then one morning a terrible tragedy occurs.

Only when Jess is able to come to grips with this tragedy does he finally understand the strength and courage Leslie has given him.

A HarperAudio production.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Aug 18, 2009
ISBN:
9780061126093
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Katherine Paterson is one of the world’s most celebrated and beloved authors. Among her many awards are two Newberys and two National Book Awards, and she was recently named a "Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She has been published in more than 22 languages in a variety of formats, from picture books to historical novels.

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Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Bridge to Terabithia

4.3
363 valutazioni / 229 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    A sweet read for young and old alike.
  • (5/5)
    Jess Aaron's goal for fifth grade was to be the fastest runner in his fifth grade class, he thought this was his year till Leslie moved in. Leslie the new girl teaches Jess a lot about life, imagination, and true friendship. Together they create a world called Terabithia. They play in this world all the time, that is until the day Leslie dies. Jess struggles to find happiness after her death but does realize in the end that it was better to have loved and lost then to have never loved at all.
  • (4/5)
    Ridiculously sad
  • (5/5)
    I had heard about this book for many years, but never went to the library to check it out. This past week I saw it in my pastor's office, borrowed it (c. 1977 hardback) and read it. This book is in pristene condition with a beautiful dust cover and illustrations by Donna Diamond. I was captivated with Paterson's writing from the first word and couldn't put the book down. If you have not read this book, I don't want to spoil the ending, but the twists and turns and experiences of Jesse and Leslie are ones to warm and tug at your heart. The family dynamics displayed sibling rivalry and parental roles in all their uniqueness. Good read.
  • (3/5)
    This is a book about friendship, imagination and heartache. It's a great children's book.
  • (5/5)
    I originally reviewed this book on my blog - The Cosy Dragon. For more recent reviews by me, please hop over there.

    Jess and Leslie are making their own secret world, where no one else can find them. It's perfect for them, where they can escape from their problems. It is marred though as the outside world demands more of their attention. I feel like this doesn't capture the book's essence at all - if you're curious (and feel up to being immersed in a childish consciousness) read it yourself!

    Paterson captures the childish pleasure in playing with your friends beautfiully. She paints Jess sympathetically, and I feel like she really remembers what it was like to be a child. Jess's drawing is something that makes him unique, and you find yourself longing for him to be successful, and be able to break out of the rut of his life.

    The language used by Paterson paints a beautiful picture and it is possible to imagine everything in your head. The words used by Jess typify a poorer country setting, and give the reader instant insight into what he thinks in his head. Jess realizes his insufficient grasp of English, but is unable to improve it. It's something that you hope he will be able to improve in the future. He knows so little about everything, he isn't well read.

    I felt like the school was perhaps a little large for the area, but the very crowded classes typical of a school that brings a huge area together rang true. Also, it is distinctly American, and Australian children are unlikely to understand the importance of visiting Washington. It's not a perfect book, but younger readers aren't going to be able to analyse it in the same way I do either.

    When I read this book for the first time in primary school I cried at the ending, and was disturbed for days. I couldn't believe it had happened. I think it touched me so much because I come from a rural background, and so I could empathize with everything that was going on and relate it to my own childhood. Instead of being ripped away from the city, I was removed for the country, but reading this books brings back so many memories!

    I believe that this has now been made into a film, but I haven't seen it. I probably don't want to either, as I usually find I hate the movies of books. I would be so sad if they wreaked the perfect storyline and didn't keep the secret country as I expected it to be.

    I'd recommend this book for children, and advise parental supervision and comforting if required. The ending is so sad!
  • (4/5)
    I tried so hard not to cry but I did. I didn’t like it at first but it redeemed it’s self. It’s been a long time since I read a sad book but that was real sad. But I hated that hippie child molester teacher! I didn't like the style because it's just not what I like. I feel like I may have liked it better if I had read it when I was younger. But altogether it was a very well written book and I enjoyed it.
  • (4/5)
    I accidentally left my current read at work when I took off at the end of the week, and not wanting to make a special trip back to the office just to retrieve it, I scanned my shelves at home for a short book that I could read quickly in the interim to get me through the weekend. This is the one that caught my eye. I was starting to think maybe I was the only person who hadn't read this book or seen the movie. I honestly didn't know too much detail about it, although I was thinking that somewhere I'd heard it had a sad part in it. I don't remember this title as a kid myself, although I remember there being a movie a few years back, and that both of my own kids have seen it.I wish I'd read this when I was younger, because it's got all the elements of a kids' classic. 10-year-old Jess comes from a fairly poor family, and just like any kid his age, he wants to be liked and accepted. He also wants to be "the fastest kid in the 5th grade". Unfortunately, things don't always turn out the way you want, and sometimes you need a friend to help you create an imaginary world where you can get away. This book captures those feelings quite well, and I imagine reading it as a child would be slightly more enchanting than reading it as an adult, but it's still a great book nonetheless. I admit to immediately turning on the TV after finishing the book so that I could stream the movie, which was good as well.
  • (4/5)
    Owned this for nine years before finally reading it. My daughter warned me about it so I'll warn you, it'll hurt.
  • (5/5)
    A charming, quick read that does not sell short the emotional and intellectual depth that children are more than capable of.
  • (3/5)
    I'm sure had I read this as a kid I would've found it much more magical than as an adult - I completely acknowledge that. I remember a lot of my friends reading this when we were in elementary school and I also remember hearing little rumbles of it being incredible controversial (moms talking to other moms and so forth). Reading it as an adult, I don't get what all the fuss was about! I asked my mom after reading it if she remembered what the big deal was and she just kind of rolled her eyes and said it was because one of the characters had drowned in the end and many adults thought that younger kids shouldn't be reading about that sort of thing.Imagine my shock! That was it!? I'd had The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe read TO ME when I was younger, and the characters sacrifice the most hopeful main character in the book (and in enough detail to a little kid that I was so devastated over Aslan - my heart was shattered). If the Chronicles of Narnia books are completely acceptable to be read to a much younger child, shouldn't it be okay for a kid to read, on their own, a book with a bit of tragedy but so many wonderful lessons to be learned?But I digress.This book, reading it as an adult, was just fine - a quick read with a main character that I think many kids could relate to. I would recommend this to younger readers for sure - it would be a great book to do a 'read along' with and to have conversations as they work through the book. While it didn't alter the way I view my life in any way, and it wasn't so amazing that I'll ever pick it up to reread it, it was still a good book.
  • (4/5)
    That was NOT at all what thought it would be. Damn book made me cry!
  • (3/5)
    I lost count of how many fat jokes were in there. The characters are so mean!! But I guess the story line made up for it all. Everything fixed itself in the end. I also felt that Jesse's family rushed Jesse to get over Leslie's death too fast. Therefore, it made her death a little unsatisfying.
  • (3/5)
    Young adult book. Jessie befriends a new classmate in his rural school. They become good friends and build their own castle in the nearby woods.
  • (4/5)
    After reading this book, all I thought was I wish I had a childhood friendship like Leslie and Jesse's. They both changed a lot and made each other so happy. :)

    Yup. I cried in the end. It was a great pleasure to have known you, Leslie Burke, Queen of Terabithia.
  • (4/5)
    it's a good book
  • (4/5)
    Jess has determination He wants to be the fast's kid in fifth grade. but when Leslie comes she is the fast's in the beginning they really aren't friends but then the start to become best friends. They make this secret world together were they are the rulers they call it Terabithia. I liked this book because It really had emotion and description. this book can be a little confusing at times. I recommend this book if you like a little bit of sadness in books.
  • (5/5)
    Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine PatersonThe story of young Jess and his new friend Leslie. She is different and doesn't have any friends accept Jess. Together the find their "special place" in the woods and create their own magical world. This becomes their place to escape the real world, and form a special bond.I truly love Bridge to Terabithia, to me it is a Classic. The story is heart felt, where young minds create magic. The story is about friendship, love, (some) spirituality, along with the hardship of life. I highly recommend to readers of many ages, from middle school to Adult. A definite five-star read.
  • (3/5)
    A good book.
  • (4/5)
    A good book about the struggle of loss.
  • (5/5)
    Jess becomes best friends with the new girl, Leslie, who has moved into an old house nearby. She's smart, him, not so much. Her family has money, his doesn't. But they latch onto each other like destiny meant for them to be together. They create their own secret place in the woods nearby and name it the kingdom of Terabithia. Nobody knows about it but them.A constant theme in the book is courage. Jess wants to be brave and courageous, but feels he isn't really, while Leslie seems to have courage to spare.It is difficult to say much more without dropping major spoilers. It is a brilliant, though very sad, book.
  • (5/5)
    One of the greats. Timeless & heartbreaking. A must read for all.
  • (5/5)
    When we are young, we think we can save others. Some of us learn younger than others that we can't. I can't think of a single other book that confronts the gaping chasm between childhood fantasy and harsh reality so perfectly. My fifth grade teacher must have had a heart of steel to be able to read this to us out loud without crying. 25 years later, I'm still bawling my eyes out.
  • (3/5)
    It has been a while since I last read Bridge to Terabithia, but it’s one of the stories that has stayed with me. It was probably the first book that had an emotional impact on me (and most of my class). Excellent for younger readers.
  • (3/5)
    Read this for Children's Lit. Surprising book with nice closure.
  • (5/5)
    Lovely, touching story with so many life lessons in it. Written in a style like kids this age talk (although I’m an adult). The story needed to get to me at first, which took about 1/3 of the book, but it was so worth it!
  • (3/5)
    It doesn’t read me the sencond chapter of the book
  • (5/5)
    This book always make me cry.
    One of the best children book i've ever read
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful book. A few swear words and heavy topic of death. Wouldn't recommend for young children but Middle school age instead.
  • (5/5)
    uygfjsdgfjsfabsdkfhgbvskhdfyukbgj
    WHYYYY
    I NEVER GOT OVER IT
    ITS SO SAD