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The Ruling Sea

The Ruling Sea

Scritto da Robert V. S. Redick

Narrato da Michael Page


The Ruling Sea

Scritto da Robert V. S. Redick

Narrato da Michael Page

valutazioni:
4/5 (8 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
27 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 8, 2010
ISBN:
9781400182954
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The Ruling Sea begins where Robert V. S. Redick's acclaimed The Red Wolf Conspiracy ended: Thasha's wedding is hours away. It is a wedding that will both fulfill the promise of a mad god's return and see her murdered. Pazel has thwarted the sorcerer who would bring back the god but both sides now face deadlock. Can Thasha be saved? Can the war between two Empires be stopped?



The Ruling Sea is, once again, focused on the giant ancient ship Chathrand, but now she must brave the terrors of the uncharted seas-the massive storms and the ship-swallowing whirlpools-and explore lands forgotten by the Northern world, all the time maintaining a vicious running battle with a ship half her size but nearly her match.



A masterpiece of plotting and adventure, Redick's new novel takes the listener further into the labyrinthine plots and betrayals that have underscored the trilogy from the beginning. We learn more about the Ixchel as they fight for survival against the Chathrand's rats, discover more about the true motives of conspirators, live with Thasha and Pazel as they face death and deceit, and watch as the Chathrand sails into the infamous Ruling Sea.
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 8, 2010
ISBN:
9781400182954
Formato:
Audiolibro


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    In the second book of "The Chathrand Voyage Quartet" we get more high seas adventure from Pazel Pathkendle and friends as the continue to battle the evil sorcerer Arunis in their effort to save Alifros.An excellent sequel to "The Red Wolf Conspiracy" that seems to show that R.S.V.R. is just hitting his stride as he fleshes out the story of a conspiracy to bring 2 countries to war, a boy that lost his family who is trying to stop it while dealing with the knowledge that he must help the very people that conquered his homeland, and not to mention they must all battle the rats to avoid the sinking of the ship and dooming all of Alifros. Great addition to the series and definitely worth checking out.
  • (2/5)
    Well... This book took me two months to finish. I'd start reading it again and then put it down in frustration and start a different book. When I'd finish that book I'd come back to this one, read a chapter or two and then put it down again. The story seems too ambiguous. There's too many characters that Redrick is trying to keep track of and thus I don't care for the majority of them. Really I'm reading the series for Pazel. Anyone other perspective and I struggle not to just skip pages upon pages. But at the same time I wanted to know where the story was going, so I kept it on my shelf in the hopes that I'd eventually finish it. Now that I am done with it, all I can say is thank god. I'll probably pick up the third book when it comes out this year but I can't bring myself to really care about the outcome anymore.
  • (4/5)
    This book is 644 pages long. It is the second book in a very complex series. The first book, the Red Wolf Conspiracy was tremendous. One that I thought had great potential for rereads. Of course a first book in a series, if you are going to reread it, means that the rest of the series is going to have to be as good. Here is where I find that Robert Redick should be spending more time thinking of where he is taking us then just writing. I mentioned the length of the book because this one took some getting into, where the other did not. This book suffers because there is time between the two books being published and my reading of them so I need a list of dramatis personae. I can't keep track with other books being read in between. But that is only a little part of the disservice and unrefinement that Redick shows. After about page 400 we learn of one and the other reasons behind much of what is happening. We learn one motivation behind one of the bad guys, and then sometime later, the motivation behind a second of the bad guys. I hope you were all following for this is 2/3rds of the way through book 2 that we get this.Doesn't that mean that we have been tossed around as a reader all this time along with our heroes reacting to the destiny they encounter in the book. Why then are they our heroes?That rude awakening makes me feel like I was taken advantage of financially and time wise. What is worse are that the two villains, both should be able to be gotten rid of, but they keep turning up, on a ship at sea. (Without radar, sonar, GPS, this should be hard to do, but you know magic...)With an end of the world theme behind it all, I am very much hoping book three shows our heroes to have some chutzpah, but I am already set up for a disappointment I fear, since the end of the series has moved from three books to four.
  • (4/5)
    Good adventure great characters a bit like "the Lion the witch and the wardrobe"
  • (4/5)
    If you are following my reviews, you have probably read how much I liked The Red Wolf Conspiracy, first part of Chathrand Voyages. Not even a rough start with too much jumping between characters could dampen my enthusiasm.But, as often happens to me when I like the first part in series so much, I delayed reading The Ruling Sea. Will it be as awesome? Maybe it was a fluke? Will Robert V.S. Redick disappoint me or earn a place in a hall of my all-time-favorites? Finally I have gathered enough courage to sail on further into the adventure.From the beginning it's perfectly clear that Robert V.S. Redick listened to the readers input. The Ruling Sea has a much more concise start and jumps between characters are not so often. Also, the fact that most of the characters are familiar to us from The Red Wolf Conspiracy helps. Although my reading went much smoother, I could not but sadly notice that excitement and tension, because of this, were also tampered down in The Ruling Sea. I know, you can never please some people. o:)I liked that The Ruling Sea gives us a better understanding of Mzithrini culture and that we get the better look at the so-called 'enemy' but I hoped that the plot will progress more. The Ruling Sea seemed more to deepen and clarify the characterisation and world building.Maybe if The Red Wolf Conspiracy was not so full of adventure you would not hear me complaining me so much, it's not like nothing happens. Chathrand sails The Ruling Sea and some new strands in the web of the conspiracy are revealed. And with huge shock and discovery at the end, I am definitely left intrigued and ready to find out more.In The End...The Ruling Sea continues adding more intriguing depths to the characters and the world, that The Red Wolf Conspiracy introduced us to. Although maybe a little bit calmer in pacing, it's a solid sequel to the series. Chathrand Voyages still has my recommendation as a good fantasy adventure if you like ships, conspiracies and magic.Disclaimer: I was given a free eBook by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.
  • (5/5)
    The second book in Reddicks Chathrand Voyage builds on everything established in the first with a consummate ease that left me salivating for more. I'm amazed that a bigger deal wasn't made of these books. The novel itself picks up shortly after the first one finishes. The passengers and crew of the Chathrand continue to struggle against an array of powerful interests, natural and supernatural both.I really enjoyed this book on every level. The plotting was exciting and unpredictable, yet satisfying. The characters continued to evolve in depth, motivation and histories, and the prose and settings were lovely. The climax was excellent, and something I particularly enjoy with Reddick's writing is that he is not afraid of change or tragedy - something too many fantasy writers shy away from in any meaningful sense. The Ruling Sea meets the promise of the first book in this series, and builds on it. Great stuff.