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Moving Day

Moving Day

Scritto da Meg Cabot

Narrato da Tara Sands


Moving Day

Scritto da Meg Cabot

Narrato da Tara Sands

valutazioni:
4/5 (29 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
4 ore
Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545122313
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

When nine-year-old Allie Finkle’s parents announce that they are moving her and her brothers from their suburban split-level into an ancient Victorian town, Allie’s sure her life is over.
Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545122313
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Meg Cabot’s many books for both adults and tweens/teens have included multiple global and #1 New York Times bestsellers, selling over twenty-five million copies worldwide. Her Princess Diaries series has been published in more than 38 countries and was made into several hit films by Disney. Meg is still waiting for her real parents, the king and queen, to restore her to her rightful throne. She currently lives in Key West, FL, with her husband and various cats.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Moving Day

3.8
29 valutazioni / 14 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Allie Finkle is a 4th grader, she loves rules , math and science. She makes rules to you can go though her life. One day when Allie got home her mom and her dad told her that they had to move and that she had to go to different school.Allie is not happy when she sees the house that they are going to move into. But Allie loves the school that she was going to go to. Is Allie going to chose to live in the house and go to the new school or stay in the school that is in and stay in the house she lives in. Read all about it in Allie FInkle's rules for girls Moving Day. I give this book 4 stars beacuse it show kids how to deal with freind relashionship and moving . The thing that I did not like about the book is that it shows kids that it is ok to try to get you family to keep your house and not move and get in toulble for doing and i gives kids ideas to get in trouble.But the parts I are when she saves the turtle form the resturent. I love this serise because I shows young girls it is ok to be your self.It also is very humors.It alos like the serise because when you start reading it you can not put it down. That is why Ilove this series and why i give this book 4 stars.
  • (4/5)
    What a great series for tween girls. Allie's humor and feistiness will engage girls who are beyond Junie B and Judy Moody. Meg Cabot has got a fourth grade girl's traumas and triumphs down pat.
  • (3/5)
    Like Meg Cabot? Wish she wrote a book your 8 year old could read? Here you go!
  • (5/5)
    Very good book! Especially if your a girl.
  • (2/5)
    9-year-old Allie doesn't want to move from her suburban home to a old Victorian in the city. It's not because she doesn't want to leave her best friend (frankly, Mary Kate is a bit of a crybaby) and it's not that her old school is so fabulous - it's that her new house is actually an OLD house, and very probably haunted by a Zombie Hand. Therefore, Allie tries to sabotage the move any way she can. As plots go, this one is a bit predictable, but luckily Allie is a thoroughly believable 9-year-old. In fact, most of the characters are just like real life, only funnier, and Cabot's trademark breezy, occasionally deadpan humor works as well for this middle-grade novel as it does in her YA books. A good start to a new series.
  • (4/5)
    cute, meg cabot, super cute. she's got a knack for writing the cutest characters ever. definitely a middle reader, but a good one for kids who like "the princess diaries," but aren't really ready to read "the princess diaries."
  • (3/5)
    Really not as good as Cabot's other work. In fact, comparatively it's pretty poor. I don't give half stars, but this one almost tempted me to a 2.5 it's readable, but quite a snoozer. And I usually enjoy children's books (and Cabot's work).
  • (3/5)
    Meg Cabot has entered into the children's department with the first in her new series, Allie Finkle's Rules for Girls, called Book 1: Moving Day.The protagonist is 4th grader, Allie Finkle, who is somewhat reminiscent of Junie B. Jones."It wasn't the hugest surprise that Mom and Dad said we were moving. ... Dad has been teaching computers for a while now and recently got a chair. When you're a professor, getting a chair doesn't mean that you finally get to sit down at work. It means that you get more money."With chapters named after "the rules," ranging from "Don't stick a spatula down your best friend's throat," to "When you do something wrong, always apologize (even if it's not entirely your fault)," Moving Day follows the trials and tribulations of this feisty 4th grader as she gradually adapts to the fact that she must leave her old friends, school and home.The book started out slow for me, and I had trouble relating to Allie as someone other than an older version of Junie B., however, as the story progresses, the reader learns that Allie is insightful (but not beyond her age level), kind to her younger brothers, and deeply concerned about the welfare of animals - (see rule #12 - When you are setting a turtle free and people are chasing you, the best thing to do is hide).This was not my favorite book for young readers, but I think that it will appeal to many young girls. Meg Cabot and Allie Finkle will likely have a devoted following for future installments.
  • (2/5)
    not very good but readable
  • (4/5)
    I picked up Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls: Moving Day, by Meg Cabot, for a little girl who loves reading and decided to read it myself before giving it to her. I was surprised at how much fun I had reading this.

    Allie is just your normal nine year old who’s parents have just announced that they are moving - not only will she no longer see her best friend but she is also moving to a spooky house where monsters lurk in the attic - and she cannot understand why she’s the only one who sees that this move will be a mistake.

    With humour and style unique to Meg Cabot, this book sees Allie getting into quite a bit of trouble and her nine year old logic behind the reasons why she does the things she does. Meg was able to make Allie’s voice that of a child and her fears and troubles were all from the point of view of a young girl.

    You’ll be chuckling at the way Allie handles her situation and why she sees things the way she does; definitely a middle grade book worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    I have to say that this seemed like a mean girls for the tweens set when this all started, and I also have to say that it seemed to stay that way for many of the characters, especially Brittany and Mary Kay. I was very impressed by the character growth that Allie demonstrated over the course of the story. By the time that the book had ended, I genuinely liked her. I didn't feel that way to start. I found her shallow and catty when it started. She really grew more likable with every decision she made. This would be a fun book for elementary level girls. Boys would most likely not enjoy it, but it was still a good book. My favorite part was the moment when Allie stood up for the cat. That, or the cupcake fight.
  • (5/5)
     Allie Finkle's problem is that she doesn't want to move to spooky, dark, scary new house but she has to. But starting new was not a just bad idea. I suggest this book to people who likes to read about friendship, rules and girls.
  • (4/5)
    My first book of Ms. Cabot’s was The Boy Next Door (which I loved and still recommend quite often) and from there I was introduced to the Heather Wells mystery series. I’ve enjoyed her books so much, that I spent most of my time last year reading her young adult collection. So when I heard she was working on a new children’s series, I was curious to know more about it.Meet Allie Finkle. She’s nine years old, currently in the fourth grade, big sister to Mark and Kevin and best friends with Mary Kay. Okay, may be Allie would like to have a new best friend. Someone who doesn’t cry all the time. Or someone who will allow Allie to decide what game to play next. Other than that, Allie’s life is pretty good. Until her parents say these two small words: “we’re moving”.Why would her parents leave their gorgeous home only to move into a falling-down Victorian? (Let’s not even talk about that fact the house is probably haunted!) On top of that, her new school isn’t so “new”. The building is rundown and the gym is also the lunchroom! (Eww…need I say more??)Allie has to think of something quick before her parents ruin her life. She’s promised to be on her best behavior and not complain about the move. If she keeps her promise, her parents will allow her to have her very own pet: a kitten (the family also has a dog). The question is, can she stop the move, but still get the kitten?I love Allie Finkle! Allie is a cute girl, with a big heart, who is trying to do the right thing all the time. To make sure she stays on the right path, she created rules for herself. Here are some of her rules: * When you finally figure out what the right thing to do is, you have to do it, even if you don’t want to. * Don’t be a braggart. * Sometimes (but not always) it’s better just to keep things to yourself. * You can’t let your family move into a haunted house. * If you get a new best friend, it’s rude to show off about it.If I were nine again, I would want Allie to be my friend. She’s creative, energetic, spunky and just fun! I loved reading Moving Day and cannot wait to read more from this series.Random tidbit: Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls series would be a wonderful selection for a mother/daughter book club.
  • (5/5)
    Nine year old Allie Finkle is happy with her life in a nice predictable suburb and steady, yet slightly boring, friends. Thus, when her parents inform her that they plan to move to another part of town into an old fixer-upper, Allie is not pleased. First, she’ll have to change schools. Second, she won’t get to hang out with her best friend, Mary Kay Shiner, very much anymore. Finally, and most importantly, the Finkle’s new home is haunted! All of these reasons plus more make Allie certain that “moving day” should never happen.Moving Day, the first book in Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls series by Meg Cabot, is truly an interesting and funny book. Allie will stop at nothing to prevent her family from moving into the run-down home that her parents so desperately love. After seeing a scary movie with her “fun” Uncle Jay, Allie is convinced that a “zombie hand” lives in the Finkle’s new attic. In her eyes, she has to protect her family from a terrible fate. In the meantime, Allie gets into a bad fight with her best friend Mary Kay and soon faces the wrath of Mary Kay and Mary Kay’s new best friend Brittany Hauser. Hmmm . . . maybe moving won’t be so bad after all? Read by Tara Sands, the audio book version of this novel is truly delightful! Tara has a wonderful way of making Allie and all of her pluckiness come to life. This is a winning series because it is relatable and very humorous. The other books in the series are: The New Girl and Best Friends and Drama Queens.