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The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making


The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

valutazioni:
4/5 (146 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Pubblicato:
May 10, 2011
ISBN:
9781441877642
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

"This is a kind of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by way of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland-it's the sort of book one doesn't want to end." -Publisher's Weekly, starred review

September is a girl who longs for adventure. When she is invited to Fairyland by a Green Wind and a Leopard, well, of course she accepts. (Mightn't you?) But Fairyland is in turmoil, and it will take one twelve-year-old girl, a book-loving dragon, and a strange and almost human boy named Saturday to vanquish an evil Marquess and restore order.

Pubblicato:
May 10, 2011
ISBN:
9781441877642
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Catherynne M. Valente is the acclaimed author of The Glass Town Game, and a New York Times bestselling author of fantasy and science fiction novels, short stories, and poetry. She has been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards, and has won the Locus and Andre Norton award. She lives on a small island off the coast of Maine with her partner, two dogs, one enormous cat, a less enormous cat, six chickens, a red accordion, an uncompleted master’s degree, a roomful of yarn, a spinning wheel with ulterior motives, a cupboard of jam and pickles, a bookshelf full of folktales, an industrial torch, and an Oxford English Dictionary. Visit her at CatherynneMValente.com.

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

4.2
146 valutazioni / 141 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    This book is creatively written however most things that occur have no rhyme or reason. Interesting but not captivating.
  • (3/5)
    I should have liked this book. I wanted to like this book. But the tone seemed overblown to me, the narrator irritatingly uninformative. I liked the main character's bouts of doubt and hardship (things are awful, and she cries like a normal person), and the decorative details of gender parity (her mother's an engineer, the bicycle cowboy is a woman). But the story didn't pick me up and lift me into fairyland.
  • (1/5)
    Did not finish. I could not get into it, and it kind of felt like the author was just attempting to write a book with a high lexile level.
  • (4/5)
    Showed a great deal of promise but I didn't feel like it delivered. Similar in tone to the Flora Segunda books but less adventurous.
  • (4/5)
    The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente, illustrated by Ana Juan There was so much to love here!

    The narrative style is just perfect. It was done similar to the way the Great Gatsby is narrated except that the tone was much more upbeat and playful. The tone was more like Flynn Ryder telling his kids the story about how he met Rapunzel in Tangled.
    The beginning is set during WWII and that's central to September's outlook on life, and some other aspects of her character.
    The story felt like the first time I saw Alice in Wonderland. Everything was strange and wonderful and made sense in it's own way. It was also full of little bits of wisdom the way that Alice in Wonderland is. I have to read the original one day...
    Heartlessness and growing a heart is dealt with in an interesting way here.
    She says yes to adventure, she doesn't just happen upon it.

    I'm probably going to read this to (or with) my son one day when he's into chapter books. I personally believe in saying yes to adventure and wanting to find obstacles to overcome, rather than waiting for things to happen to you.
  • (5/5)
    A great book, very much in the spirit of much of the classic fantasy that has come before it. The plot is intentionally reminiscent of many different traditional and modern fantasy stories, a classic take on the hero's quest that does a good job of knowing when and how to twist the elements and with more than enough cleverness to amuse and entice.The personal themes brought up in the book deal with the importance of friendship but also the necessity of dealing with some things on your own. Societally the book deals with the question of order vs freedom and what should the balance within society be when some people want more freedom and some people want more order.
  • (5/5)
    A delightful and whimsical tale!
  • (5/5)
    Oh my goodness. I love this book so much I'm going to have to do a youtube review about it too. I think what I loved most about the book was that the writing style and theme of the book read like a cross between two of my favorite books, The Chronicles of Narnia and Alice in Wonderland. In fact, the author (who writes directly to the reader at times -- just like C.S Lewis did!) references both books, in an off-hand sort of manner. It's easy to miss the reference, if you don't pay close attention. Many times, I caught myself reading quickly (cause it's a good book), and a character would say something, and I'd have to stop myself, go back and read it again, to be sure that I just read a reference to one of my favorite books! The characters are whimsical, and seem to make no sense at all, but they represent very clear and real ideas that we face each day of our lives. I like books that can present seemingly nonsensical characters and dialog, so that, the average reader might roll their eyes, but a reader who thrives on symbolism and metaphors will jump for joy when they discover the meaning behind the characters, dialog, setting and plot-line.
  • (5/5)
    Superbly enjoyable and wonderfully whimsical fairy tales for adults. Written in a adult prose of long winded sentences it carefully captures the childlike delight of fairyland whilst making several important points in the process. The plot - well it's much the same as it ever is in a Fairytale. Child (a girl named September) gains access to Fairyland, has to decide who to trust, goes on a Quest to retrieve an item, and finds out what is important to them. There's an evil Queen who's disposed Fairy;ands prior wonderful one. She's embarked on making Fairyland Nice for Human Children, and so most of the traditional fairies have had their powers hampered in some way. Only leopards are allowed to fly, all dragons, wyverns and fairies have their wings chained shut. This is just one example of the darker themes that run through the story. I wouldn't really class this as a book for children. It's also full of more nuanced words like Circumnavigate, that are probably a challenge for younger readers. There is however a lot here to delight adults so thats OK. Some of the traditional concepts of Fairyland have been twisted, such as the Various Means a child may enter, and some, such as not eating the food, and the glamour of their magic, have been kept intact. It all works very well, and is sufficiently explained (at least by the end). Perhaps my highest praise goes to the continuity which is meticulously maintained throughout - no easy feat in such a story.The style is pseudo Victorian, with subtitled chapters and an active narrator. I dislike both really, but they work well enough here. The Narrator's voice is kept to a minimum, not even appearing once in every chapter, just enough to add a little bit of information that our heroine September is unaware of. Her name is probably the most annoying thing about the whole book. There is no particular reason why an ordinary american girl should be called September. Initially there is some indication that it might not be her 'True' name - a prized concept in Fairy - but his never turns out to be case, so she is stuck with September. Meanwhile short asides declaim upon the freedom of choice (ala Thomas Covenant but in far shorter and happier manner); the importance of shoes; the wisdom of baths; the innocence and commensurate insensibility of children; and many other themes. All of which carry that light hearted whimsical tone that you'd expect from Alice in Wonderland, but when you stop and think about it are more profound than Alice's drug dreams. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and indeed laughed aloud at several points, which is good for a fairy Tale. I recommend it to any adult who is still in touch with their inner child.There is apparently a sequel - space was just about left for one. And I shall track it down without fear of failure.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this book. I was a nice easy read 
  • (2/5)
    I decided to read this since I had heard lots of great things about it. It was serialized on the web and it shows by the story structure. I thought it was ok but the interior illustrations were really a high point to the book for me. I don't think I will bother with the next book when it does come out though.
  • (4/5)
    I actually had kind of a hard time reading this book. Not because it wasn't totally wonderful -- it was -- but my expectations were ridiculously sky high. First of all, Valente's The Orphan's Tales in the Night Garden is one of my favorite books. Secondly, I'd heard many lovely things about this novel. Finally, I was excited about the idea of Valente writing fairy tales for children/teens. All of which is wonderful, but then when I finally started reading, I couldn't manage to stay in the stream of the story, I kept surfacing to take measurements -- "Is this as awesome as I was expecting it to be?" "Could Jefferson appreciate and ove this when he read it?"

    That was problematic. Because otherwise this book was charming. There were a number of absolutely lovely turns of phrase -- quotes I had to write down immediately, conversations I had to read aloud to my husband, and amazingly delightful inventions -- like the wyverary, which is what is born when a wyvern and a library love each other very much...

    Had I read this book without such expectations, I feel sure I would have been blown away. Valente is bold and fierce, but can also be almost unbearably tender. The number of times she managed to upend my expectations was impressive, but what was more so was that all these surprise turns worked -- they were cohesive and felt true.

    When Jefferson comes home from Grandma's, we will have to have a conversation about this book. Also, there's a sequel. That's going to have to be mine.
  • (4/5)
    This isn't the kind of book that I'd normally pick--fantasy is definitely not a genre that I like, but some friends were reading this book and recommended it highly. Despite my misgivings, this turned out to be really good. Comparisons to The Phantom Tollbooth and Alice in Wonderland are not far off, though there's something I still like better about the Phantom Tollbooth. I had to push myself through the first few chapters, which veered towards just plain silly at times. I'm glad to report that this book got better the more I read--some real conflicts develop, a mission evolves, and the glue that holds the story together starts becoming more obvious. The end, though, really is quite spectacular and contains a genuine plot twist. This all said, its obvious that the author loves to write--she plays with words and phrases in a really lovely an delightful way. Fans of drier and more factual prose might find this style annoying, but I think it added to the book's overall flavor. September is a nice enough heroine who became more likable as the book went on, but I didn't feel any incredibly strong emotional attachment to her. The other characters are enjoyable, but don't seem to have quite enough character flaws to make them more interesting. The Marquess is one of the most complex villains I've run across lately and the book holds together largely because of her personal story. Overall, I thought this was a lovely book and I'd encourage even non-fans of fantasy novels to give it an honest chance.
  • (1/5)
    Tried on two different occasions to read this book and can't do it.
    I'm sure it was a blast to write (you could tell she was having fun) and I'm sure for some people this is right up their alley but it's just not for me.
    If this is what I liked I would give it 5 stars but I tried to finish twice and couldn't so I'm giving it 1 star.
  • (4/5)
    This book was exactly what I was hoping for: a Neil Gaiman-style children's book for adults, without all the yucky Neil Gaiman bits. Really, really lovely.
  • (4/5)
    An enchanting adventure that will appeal to the young at heart no matter the age! A new classic!
  • (2/5)
    I wanted very much to enjoy this book, as it was recommended by someone who knows me well. I struggled through 2/3 of it and when I realized I wasn't reading very much because I was avoiding it, I decided to put it down. This is what I would suggest my students do, after all. September is exactly the heroine we want in our children's books, but the book felt disjointed and disconnected. I just could not get into it.
  • (5/5)
    This book was magical in the best sense of the world. It is technically a children's book, but it reads so well on so many different levels. There was a sense of menace in the author's fairyland, sort of like you find in Roald Dahl's books or in Lewis Carroll's original Alice in Wonderland. I loved the little girl who is the main character. She's not always the most pleasant of children, but sometimes that serves her well.
  • (4/5)
    I wouldn't necessarily class this one as a children's book - it has more in common with books like Terry Pratchett's Tiffany Aching books; it's *suitable* for children, certainly, but it works perfectly fine for adults too.It took a while to get going for me, and felt derivative rather than homage-y at times.It's a book which takes you with it where it chooses to go, rather than one to be read because you want to know how things turn out. The concrete test is whether I'm going to read the next in the series, and I am, but I probably wouldn't if it wasn't cheap.
  • (4/5)
    After a slightly slow start, I found that like September I was less heartless than I thought. Absolutely charming, light-hearted and dark-shadowed all at once.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: September is in the middle of washing the dishes when the Green Wind comes in through the kitchen window and offers to take September away to Fairyland. Her father is away fighting a war, and her mother is always at work at the factory, so September bids farewell to her home in Nebraska without a second thought. The Green Wind is not allowed into Fairyland proper, however, so after he gives September some advice on travelling - and warns her to steer clear of the Marquess, who rules Fairyland - September finds herself deposited in the Perilous and Perverse sea, with a single shoe, a desperately helpful jacket, and enough magic to be able to see some of Fairyland's secrets. She soon meets some witches, whose stolen spoon she promises to reclaim from the Marquess, and A-through-L, a half-wyvern, half-library who is willing to accompany on her travels to Pandemonium, the capital. But, as is always the case in Fairyland, September's quest is more difficult than it seemed at first, and she must face dangers and unravel the mysteries if she is to have any chance of surviving, let alone completing her task.Review: This book was amazingly good. Or, more accurately, 80% of this book was good, and 20% of it was amazing, but that 20% came at the end, and turned what was an enjoyable but not particularly mind-blowing book into something that I am raving over.So, for most of the book, I was thinking "okay, it's a modern twist on Victorian children's fairy tales," with a fourth-wall-breaking narrator and some self-awarely-old-fashioned language and a more modern sardonic perspective of some of the moralizing done in classic stories of this type, but still hewing true to the original formula: disaffected child is taken away to Faerie, where things are strange and magical and where she has adventures and faces dangers and learns lessons about courage or friendship or home or whatever. And, as I said, I was fine with all of that. I like fairy tales in all their forms, I like modern retellings that wink at but don't talk down to their audiences, and I was getting along well with Valente's sense of humor. If that had been all there was to the book, I would have finished it a happy camper.But that's not all there was to the story. In the last few chapters, as September finally figures out what's really going on, the whole perspective of the story shifts, and it's brilliant. Valente manages to take a completely fresh look at one of the more troubling and dissatisfying aspects of the fairy stories she's emulating, while still managing to make it fit into the tone and conventions of those very stories. I don't want to give too many details away, for fear of spoiling that moment of revelation, but it was a twist that bowled me over, stole my heart, and threw everything that Valente had done with the first part of the book into a completely new light, both plot-wise and literary-wise. I probably would have read the sequels regardless, but the last few chapters rocketed them up to the top of my list. 4 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: This book relies on a lot of the conventions of the "stolen child" fairy story - books like the Narnia series or Alice in Wonderland or The Phantom Tollbooth - so if you grew up with those books, and/or if you like more modern twists on the form (Neil Gaiman's Stardust comes to mind), then The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making is a light read that will be right up your alley.
  • (3/5)
    The voice started off a bit twee for me but I found it better as it went on - whether it actually improved or I just got used to it I don't know. Valente's Fairyland felt more composed of lots of neat ideas than something of an organic whole but there definitely were lots of neat ideas in there, and the climax and conclusion were worth it.
  • (4/5)
    Charming, and delightful!
  • (5/5)
    What a delightful story! Review on the way.
  • (4/5)
    Valente is extraordinarily good at tales. She can play with them like a cats-cradle, so that a girl may be Peter Pan and an engineer and a tree all at once, and her adversary may be a princess and a wicked witch and several ages all at the same time. This is mostly the story of September, a little girl who travels to Fairyland and has extraordinary adventures there. Valente's language is beautifully baroque, with lots of word play, yet never loses its clarity. I loved this story, and can't wait to return to it.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this so much!!
  • (5/5)
    This book left me speechless. Granted, my world is held up by the supports of narratives like Fairyland, and so September became very dear to me. It is stellar. It is stunning. It wrests the Fairy Tale from the maw of Walt Disney and places back firmly in the darkened forest of teeth. This is not just a "tale", it says something about tales, it has a point of view about their weight and their influence. She presents us with a strong able heroine, without resorting to the (altogether bloody *boring*) idea of Gender-Role-Reversal, and without the obligatory (often annoying) "sassiness".

    I liked this book so much I don't even want to recommend it to everyone. Because I don't want to have a conversation about how you didn't like it, if you don't.

    But still. Buy it. Read it. Give it to friends. There's a reason this book is on the bestseller list.
  • (3/5)
    A book that I might have enjoyed more at a younger age. Very reminiscent of any number of fairy tales from the 19th century and early 20th century that I read as child.
    A young girl gets taken into fairyland and finds herself in a land governed by an evil girl.
    Read as an audiobook.
  • (4/5)
    Imaginative and resplendent with Valente's particular flourish for language. I even teared up a little, there at the end. However, I was also a little bored throughout the middle. BUT I have children, 4 & 7, and I cannot wait for them to read it!
  • (5/5)
    I am at a loss on how to rate this book but feel as another reviewer stated "in my heart I want to give it 5 stars". I do believe you need to be in just the right mood to read this one and if you are - then you are in for quite an adventure and a treat. It is sometimes like other books you may have read (think Alice in Wonderland, Oz etc) but at the same time it is NOTHING like anything you have read. The writing style is what really caught my attention. The characters are wonderful and so is the narration. It reads very personal/intimate between you and the narrator at times. A really unique read.