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The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious--and Perplexing--city

The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious--and Perplexing--city

Scritto da David Lebovitz

Narrato da David Drummond


The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World's Most Glorious--and Perplexing--city

Scritto da David Lebovitz

Narrato da David Drummond

valutazioni:
4/5 (43 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jun 29, 2012
ISBN:
9781452678283
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Like so many others, David Lebovitz dreamed about living in Paris ever since he first visited the city in the 1980s. Finally, after a nearly two-decade career as a pastry chef and cookbook author, he moved to Paris to start a new life. Having crammed all his worldly belongings into three suitcases, he arrived, hopes high, at his new apartment in the lively Bastille neighborhood.

But he soon discovered it's a different world en France.

From learning the ironclad rules of social conduct to the mysteries of men's footwear, from shopkeepers who work so hard not to sell you anything to the etiquette of working the right way around the cheese plate, here is David's story of how he came to fall in love with-and even understand-this glorious, yet sometimes maddening, city.

When did he realize he had morphed into un vrai parisien? It might have been when he found himself considering a purchase of men's dress socks with cartoon characters on them. Or perhaps the time he went to a bank with 135 euros in hand to make a 134-euro payment, was told the bank had no change that day, and thought it was completely normal. Or when he found himself dressing up to take out the garbage because he had come to accept that in Paris appearances and image mean everything.

The more than fifty original recipes, for dishes both savory and sweet, such as Pork Loin with Brown Sugar-Bourbon Glaze, Braised Turkey in Beaujolais Nouveau with Prunes, Bacon and Bleu Cheese Cake, Chocolate-Coconut Marshmallows, Chocolate Spice Bread, Lemon-Glazed Madeleines, and Mocha-Crème Fraîche Cake, will have listeners running to the kitchen once they stop laughing.

The Sweet Life in Paris is a deliciously funny, offbeat, and irreverent look at the city of lights, cheese, chocolate, and other confections.
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jun 29, 2012
ISBN:
9781452678283
Formato:
Audiolibro


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43 valutazioni / 30 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Funny anecdotes about living in Paris - I was happy to learn you can now get decas (decaf coffees) in the cafes.
  • (3/5)
    I read this as part of my renewed obsession with everything Paris, and because I love Lebovitz's blog. It was a quick and enjoyable read with lots of humorous anecdotes about life in the City of Light that sometimes had me laughing out loud. Less of a love letter and more of a therapeutic assessment of your love's good and bad qualities. The included recipes are mouth-watering, of course.
  • (3/5)
    This was charming, but maybe a little too try-hard.
    I like his blog better...and his ice cream cookbook even better than that!
  • (3/5)
    A fun, vicarious jaunt through life in Paris with David Lebovitz, who is just enough of curmudgeon to be completely charming.
  • (4/5)
    This autobiographical account of a famous chef's life in Paris was both informative and entertaining. Though David had moved from San Francisco to Paris seven years before, his culture shock is humorously retold through short stories filled with advice about how to fit in with Parisians and recipes that capture Parisian flavors. I enjoyed this insightful collection, as it helped explain the mindset of native Parisians and their expectations for appropriate behavior in their city. As I have never visited Paris, however, I'm not sure I'm more inclined to do so after reading these stories as it describes a challenging way of life that exceeds what I would have expected. I probably would still travel to Paris, but I would probably re-read this book before I go, so as to avoid unfortunate cultural gaffes during my stay. I will definately be trying the recipes... in fact, I think I'm going to make the chocolate cake tonight!
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful, funny, quirky and insightful tale of an American pastry chef relocating to Paris. His attempts at adjustment and fitting in are humorous and touching. A great read - especially for those of us who love to travel!
  • (4/5)
    I'm thinking that the 'new' version I have is the paperback edition which is just out or about to come out. What a perfectly delightful person he is---talking right to the reader about everything he is thinking on different subjects having to do with living in, of all places, Paris----and what a description comes forth---the good, the bad and the ugly---plus some yummy looking recipes. His humor made me laugh out loud as I read.
  • (4/5)
    Since visiting France, and spending a few days in Paris, I've been a bit of a "sucker" for books about the French. [The Sweet Life in Paris] was a quick, fun read with the author combining an irony filled memoir of living in Paris, with a collection of his recipes for desserts, and French inspired foods. He does try to use ingredients available to Americans, but does definitely impress me with his fancy foods. Recipes are ust accessible enough that I might try some of the simpler ones.I originally picked up the book because I needed something easy to read while soaking in my bathtub (a favorite reading place for me) but I soon found that I was bringing the book with me in my purse because I was hooked. I recommend it to readers who are interested in France, the french, and in cooking.
  • (5/5)
    A very clear-eyed (and funny) look at the realities of living in Paris, with all its positives and negatives. It is a wonderful city but it also presents many challenges to the newcomer. A great read. (Also full of recipes which as someone who doesn't cook, I'm not qualified to comment upon.)
  • (3/5)
    This book made me hungry!! I probably gained a few pounds just dreaming about the food he talks about - the pastries, the cheese, crepes, chocolates. I loved the the everyday anecdotes of the author's life in Paris, becoming assimilated into the culture and nuances of life there. I also learned how to properly slice different kinds of cheeses, which is always good to know.I loved his chapters on chocolate and coffee- two of my favorite things. It seems that while Paris has amazing chocolate, and I would love to have some delivered to my door in a turquoise bag from Patrick Rogers (I would like to try Arrogance please), it appears that I would hate the coffee. Immensely. I think that was my favorite part in the book- where he discusses French coffee, and the many ways it can be ordered, and how you should order it if even in Paris. Since I practically have a coffee drip attached to me, this is information I can use. I plan on passing this book on to my husband, who actually enjoys cooking and baking, and his favorite is French cooking and baking. Hopefully he will try his hand at some of the recipes provided, such as the financiers, the cinnamon meringue with espresso, and the fromage blanc souffle. And of course the nutella crepes.
  • (5/5)
    I love the idea of cooking. I also love reading. And travel. A book that combines all three with humour and self-depreciation is all right by me!Mr. Lebovitz's writing reminds me of David Sedaris, high praise as I love his short stories.He is self-depreciating and admits that the story of his life in Paris is not the typical armchair travel - he never seems to grasp the language, he didn't buy a house to renovate. In fact, all he did was try and live.I say all he did not to decrease the value of his story - in fact, I think it adds a certain appeal. We have all dreamed of moving to Paris, and he lends hints on how to adapt to this crazy culture without entirely losing your mind.The recipes which he also includes in the book are entrancing. All of them are easy enough that even I could try making them, but the flavour combinations are the true masterpieces. He pairs food and spices together in a remarkable manner. I have one of his cookbooks, the ice cream one, and I have had remarkable results with it.So, I wholeheartedly recommend that you read this book, especially if you're planning a trip to Paris soon like me and wish to try some excellent food. However, even if you are not going to Paris soon, I still want you to read this book. It is funny and endearing and clever. Be sure to check out his cookbooks as well. Though I have only seen the ice cream one, his other books have gotten rave reviews!
  • (5/5)
    The Chez Panisse pastry chef, accustomed to Bay Area life, transplants himself to Paris, with recipes and reflections. Zut!
  • (4/5)
    Oh, David Lebovitz.... I am a fan of Lebovitz's blog, and this book presents snippets of Parisian life and recipes in a similar way. It was enjoyable to read and I have passed it on to friends who are also enjoying it. One thing I must say: I don't think I could ever live in Paris after reading this book, so if anyone you know is planning to move there they might need this book as a heads-up!
  • (3/5)
    Goofy, cheeky, entertaining, and incredibly American. Not a bad way to kill some time.
  • (5/5)
    Eloquently read and written. I enjoyed this book with its vivid depiction of this mans experience. Absolutely must read/listen!!
  • (4/5)
    Laugh out loud funny with great recipes.
  • (4/5)
    I'm planning a trip to Paris this year and wanted to read a memoir from an American living there now. Mr. Lebovitz certainly finds the humor in day-to-day events. Apparently the coffee in Paris is like liquified mud, and Parisians are pushy, refuse to wait in line, and routinely walk into people. I haven't figured out yet why Mr. Lebovitz continues to live there. Wish he would spend more time on the beauty and romance of the city. After reading this book, I can't say I'm looking forward to my trip.
  • (4/5)
    Just finished [The Sweet Life in Paris] and I really enjoyed it! [[David Lebovitz]] was 12 years as the pastry chef in Alice Water's Chez Panisse in San Franscisco (oh man, would I ever love to go there!!) and knows a thing or two about sweets and desserts. He has now lived in Paris for years and wrote this book with some hot tips for American travellers (especially what NOT to do!!) and some great personal stories about his exploring there. Of course his food stories are very appetite making and to top it all off he gives amazing and drool worthy recipes. What a fun book! His chapter on strikes in Paris gives the recipe for mixed nuts!
  • (4/5)
    Definitely one of my favorite expat-in-Paris books! The observations were so good, and so EDUCATIONAL. If you are going to Paris you should read this book so you know how to behave properly in the shops and such. I always consider myself fairly in tune to these things, as I speak French and lived there (okay, not in Paris, but still - France) for 6 months, but boy did I learn a lot from this book!

    Also: I am seriously craving some brownies right now.
  • (4/5)
    Amusing and yet personal portrayal of Paris from an American chef who lives there. Each chapter has a topic and some related (or not) recipes that sound delicious, plus good advice for anyone going to Paris to visit or live. The style of the chapters becomes somewhat repetitive - each creates a motif and then has a punch line related to the motif at the end - but otherwise definitely worth reading. Reminded me of Peter Mayle, only with better food.
  • (4/5)
    David Lebowitz is a pastry chef (trained at Chez Panisse in California) who cooks, writes and blogs in Paris. He's one of my husband's favorite food bloggers and has been reading his web postings for about ten years. This book about his life in Paris is a delight. is essays on the bureaucratic nightmare of the French national and Paris municipal governments made me laugh out loud and his descriptions of the wonderful food markets, boulangeries and fromageries mAde me want to hope onto a plane and make the flight over the pond to my favorite city.He also includes his own pastry recipes that sound wonderful, if a bit involved. Plus there are a couple of useful appendices listing shops, restaurants and web sites. These are perfect for planning a trip or finding ingredients and cooking equipment for adventures in your own kitchen. If a trip to Paris isn't in your immediate future, this book is a good armchair substitute.
  • (4/5)
    A memoir made for Francophiles and foodies, David Lebovitz marries his love of croissants and pain au chocolat with a long-term jaunt in the City of Lights. Recipes included.
  • (3/5)

    I have never been to Paris but when I get there I want to have this book with me. In telling us about his adventures living in Paris Lebovitz has written the perfect insider’s guide. He covers all the things you need to know to live in (or visit) Paris like a pro. I loved the short funny informative chapters each imparting a little bit of hard won wisdom - how to wait in line, how to dress like a Parisian, the most important words to use when shopping...Each chapter ends with recipes that will satisfy both French and American sensibilities.
  • (5/5)
    If you've ever visited Lebovitz's website, you know that he's an American who has made Paris his home and goes around the city eating the most incredible stuff. Oh, and he's also baker who spent over a decade in the kitchen of Chez Panisse, and has authored a couple ofl cookbooks.In this one, he gives plenty of recipes, usually his own, but some that were given to him by friends, but the recipes are given at the end of the chapters. The bulk of the writing is about aspects of living in Paris, being an American in Paris and the characteristics of the typical Parisian. Nearly as funny as David Sedaris, Lebovitz describes dealing with the French health care system, attending a language school where he was screamed at for bad pronunciation, how to walk down a Paris street without being knocked down, and the impossiblilty of finding both water and a bathroom in the city.This book contains recipes for chocolate chip cream puffs, a dense almost-flourless chocolate cake, a low-fat carmel apple tart and TWO versions of chocolate mousse. I want to try everything.
  • (4/5)
    This book really makes you feel like a Paris insider, plus it has some terrific recipes. I found it comforting that the French living outside of Paris feel the same way about City of Light residents as I did during my two brief visits there. A definite recommend for foodies, travel lovers, anyone considering a trip to see the Eiffel Tower, and Francophiles or anti-Francophiles.
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly funny! I like surprises.
  • (4/5)
    Six-word review:Semisweet valentine to Paris, with recipes.
  • (4/5)
    The Sweet Life in Paris is the moving-and-starting-over story of Lebovitz’s venture into Parisian life. It’s a story we have heard many times before, of the trials of dealing with French bureaucracy, of figuring out how to get service in French stores, and of trying to fit into a world that secretly scorns everything that is not French. Yes, we have heard this story many times before, but it is a story we will never tire of, a story we want to read again and again, until maybe, one day, we tell the story of our own move to this magical place.I loved how Lebovitz tells how he realized he was finally un vrai parisien. It was not a big day, but a simple day, the day he dressed up to take out his garbage. How we all want to live in a world where everyone dresses up to take out the garbage!The best part, of course, is David’s take on Paris treats. David is, of course, an expert on pastries, so who better to take us around Paris and share pastry gossip? An absolutely delicious book, filled with stories about those amazing sweets of Paris. With recipes.
  • (4/5)
    The Sweet Life in Paris is the moving-and-starting-over story of Lebovitz’s venture into Parisian life. It’s a story we have heard many times before, of the trials of dealing with French bureaucracy, of figuring out how to get service in French stores, and of trying to fit into a world that secretly scorns everything that is not French. Yes, we have heard this story many times before, but it is a story we will never tire of, a story we want to read again and again, until maybe, one day, we tell the story of our own move to this magical place.I loved how Lebovitz tells how he realized he was finally un vrai parisien. It was not a big day, but a simple day, the day he dressed up to take out his garbage. How we all want to live in a world where everyone dresses up to take out the garbage!The best part, of course, is David’s take on Paris treats. David is, of course, an expert on pastries, so who better to take us around Paris and share pastry gossip? An absolutely delicious book, filled with stories about those amazing sweets of Paris. With recipes.
  • (5/5)
    Pastry chef and cookbook author David Lebovitz has amassed a large following for his Paris/food blog, and these pleasant essays and first rate recipes explain why. Lebovitz‘s ‘The Sweet Life in Paris’ is indeed sweet for the reader.His subtitle says it all: Delicious Adventures in the World’s Most Glorious - and Perplexing - City. Lebovitz’s take on the Parisian scene is laugh aloud funny and spot on. His willingness to laugh at his own mistakes and his awe at the brassiness of the Parisian character make this book a charmer. His topics are varied - setting up a new apartment, the Parisian attitude toward nudity, what not to say at dinner parties, how to traverse Paris streets and survive, the awesome power of Dulce de Leche Brownies….The reader comes to share his joy at having survived his semi-assimilation into Parisian life and culture. (Remember those fifth grade book reports when you had to come up with a theme for your book? This one would be easy - it wasn’t easy but the author made a place for himself in Paris [of all places!] by being nice and learning when to push back.) Each essay is followed by a Lebovitz recipe or two. As I read I marked eleven to try right away. Highly recommended for those who love Paris, those who love food, and those who are willing to laugh aloud.